BLOG POSTS

2021

Posted 3 days ago
Cardiac Effects of Phosphodiesterase‑5 Inhibitors: Efficacy and Safety
Post Date: October 19, 2021   Author: Roy, Kloner, Salloum, Jovin   Category: Cardiovascular

The coexistence of cardiovascular disease and erectile dysfunction is widespread, possibly owing to underlying endothelial dysfunction in both diseases. Millions of patients with cardiovascular disease are prescribed phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors for the management of erectile dysfunction. Although the role of PDE5 inhibitors in erectile dysfunction therapy is well established, their efects on the cardiovascular system are unclear. Preclinical studies investigating the efect of PDE5 inhibitors on ischemia–reperfusion injury, pressure overload-induced hypertrophy, and chemotoxicity suggested a possible clinical role for each of these medications; however, attempts to translate these fndings to the bedside have resulted in mixed outcomes. In this review, we explore the biologic preclinical efects of PDE5 inhibitors in mediating cardioprotection. We then examine clinical trials investigating PDE5 inhibition in patients with heart failure, coronary artery disease, and ventricular arrhythmias and discuss why the studies likely have yet to show positive results and efcacy with PDE5 inhibition despite no safety concerns.

Download PDF (987 kb)

Posted 9 days ago
Dr. Fonteh's Editorial Published in Frontiers in Physiology
Post Date: October 13, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Neuroscience

Dr. Alfred Fonteh, along with Kimberley D. Bruce and Hussein N. Yassine, wrote an editorial published in in Frontiers in Physiology, section Lipid and Fatty Acid Research. In the editorial, Dr. Fonteh and team highlight the current understanding of the role of lipids in CNS healh and disease, future research studies, and the benefits of lipid analyses in mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Alzheimer’s disease.

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphys.2021.768417/full

TITLE: Editorial: Lipid Metabolism and Transport in CNS Health and Disease

Date: October 13, 2021

Citation: Bruce KD, Yassine HN and Fonteh AN (2021) Editorial: Lipid Metabolism and Transport in CNS Health and Disease. Front. Physiol. 12:768417. doi: 10.3389/fphys.2021.768417

Posted 32 days ago
COVID-19 Impacts to Cardiovascular System Outlined in Review Published by Dr. Kloner and Colleague in Journal "Cardiology Research"
Post Date: September 20, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Cardiovascular

HMRI’s Dr. Robert Kloner and colleague Dr. Shereif H. Rezkall published an article which details post-COVID symptoms with an emphasis on the cardiovascular system. The review published in the Cardiology Research journal highlights potential new challenges post-COVID to our healthcare systems.

 

Title: Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-COVID-2 Syndrome: Just the Beginning

Date:  September 21, 2021
 
Authors: Rezkalla, Shereif H., & Robert A. Kloner. "Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-COVID-2 Syndrome: Just the Beginning." Cardiology Research [Online], 0 (2021): n. pag. Web. 21 Sep. 2021
Posted 38 days ago
Pasadena NOW & Pasadena Journal Highlight Impact of STEM on How Girls See Their Futures
Post Date: September 14, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: STEM Education

HMRI's High School STEM Program is once again making headlines. Pasadena NOW and the Pasadena Journal shared the empowering story of local Pasadena high school girls who see a different future for themselves, thanks to the opportunities they received this summer in HMRI's STEM classes. Read more here:

Pasadena NOW Article

Pasadena Journal Article

 

Posted 49 days ago
HMRI Neuroscience Research Team and Stanford University Migraine Research Published in "Frontiers in Molecular Neurosciences."
Post Date: September 3, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Neuroscience

HMRI Neurosciences research team led by Senior Scientist Alfred N. Fonteh and their collaborators from Stanford University found that the plasma of participants with chronic migraine have higher lipid products. The process responsible for forming these lipid products may provide mechanistic insights and can be targeted for treating migraine. This work was published in Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience - Pain Mechanism and Modulators.

DATE: August 31, 2021

PUBLICATION: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience - Pain Mechanism and Modulators

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fnmol.2021.691733

TITLE: 

Plasma Lipolysis and Changes in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid Signaling Lipids Reveal Abnormal Lipid Metabolism in Chronic Migraine

COLLABORATORS:Katherine Castor1Jessica Dawlaty1Xianghong Arakaki1,2Noah Gross1Yohannes W. Woldeamanuel3Michael G. Harrington1,2,4Robert P. Cowan3* and Alfred N. Fonteh1,2*

Posted 56 days ago
HMRI Cardiovascular Scientist Dr. Nicole Purcell was Guest Editor for Cellular Signalling's Special Issue About Cardiac Phosphatases
Post Date: August 27, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Cardiovascular

While COVID-19 has dramatically changed our world, HMRI Cardiovascular Scientist Dr. Nikki Purcell and her undergraduate team continued to make incredible progress on targeted therapies for life-altering diseases. Purcell led a review recently published in a special issue in Cellular Signalling in Cardiac Phosphatases that paired her lab data with a comprehensive assessment of current studies on PHLPP in cardiovascular diseases. The assessment further proved the importance of the proteins role in several aliments from diabetes to cancer to cardiovascular disease.

DATE: July 25, 2021

PUBLICATION: Cellular Signalling

PMID: 34320369

DOI: 10.1016/j.cellsig.2021.110097

TITLE: 

On the PHLPPside: Emerging roles of PHLPP phosphatases in the heart

COLLABORATORS: Kellie A Lemoine 1Julianna M Fassas 1Shirag H Ohannesian 1Nicole H Purcell 2

Posted 59 days ago
Collaborative Paper Published in the Journal Radiology Highlights Use of Cardiac MRI in Predicting Patient Success Post Heart Attack
Post Date: August 24, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Cardiovascular

HMRI's Cardiovascular Research Scientific Director Robert Kloner, MD, collaborated on a paper published in the journal Radiology which reviews the importance of noninvasive cardiac imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the structure and the function of the heart post heart attack. MRI uses magnets to create the images which provide important information to the clinician, such as the size of the heart attack, is there a hemorrhage into the heart attack, or is there a condition known as microvascular obstruction (MVO). When a patient has MVO they have suffered damage and blockages to the small blood vessels and capillaries in the wall of the heart; this damage remains even after the major large coronary artery that was blocked during the heart attack is now unblocked. Cardiac MRI can also be used to image how the heart heals, whether the it becomes dilated, and/or how the heart functions (contracts) post heart attack, details which help predict the patient's treatment success, their likelihood of developing heart failure and/or their recovering heart function.

 

DATE: August 24, 2021

PUBLICATION: Radiology

PMID: 34427461

TITLE: 

Cardiac MRI to Visualize Myocardial Damage after ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Review of Its Histologic Validation

COLLABORATORS: Casper W H Beijnink 1Nina W van der Hoeven 1Lara S F Konijnenberg 1Raymond J Kim 1Sebastiaan C A M Bekkers 1Robert A Kloner 1Henk Everaars 1Saloua El Messaoudi 1Albert C van Rossum 1Niels van Royen 1Robin Nijveldt 1

 

 

Posted 71 days ago
Pasadena Outlook Highlights HMRI STEM Program Final Ceremony & Celebration
Post Date: August 12, 2021   Author: Sandra Loden   Category: STEM Education

The HMRI High School Student STEM Program celebration and closing ceremony was higlighted in the August 12, 2021 edition of Pasadena Outlook Magazine! 

» Click here for more details.

Huntington Medical Research Institutes STEM Program Benefits PUSD Students

Posted 81 days ago
Pasadena NOW Article Showcases HMRI's Successful STEM Program Closing Ceremony
Post Date: August 2, 2021   Author: Sandra Loden   Category: STEM Education

Pasadena NOW featured HMRI's High School STEM Program closing ceremony in it's August 12 edition. Check out the article online at:  

Eight PUSD Students Complete Huntington Medical Research Institutes Six-Week Biomedical Research Program

 

Posted 84 days ago
HMRI's Dr. Kloner Published in Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Post Date: July 30, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Cardiovascular

HMRI's Chief Science Officer and Scientific Director Cardiovascular Research Robert A. Kloner, M.D., was published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics on July 30, 2021. In his letter to the editor, Dr. Kloner discusses the importance of reducing inflamation during heartattacks to reduce the size of cardiovascular event. "Even a 5% reduction in mycardial infract size may be clinically meaningful," says Dr. Kloner in the published letter. See attached PDF for the full letter. 

» Attachment (PDF 94kb)

Posted 85 days ago
Pasadena Outlook Highlights HMRI STEM Program Launch
Post Date: July 29, 2021   Author: Sandra Loden   Category: STEM Education

The HMRI High School Student STEM Program was higlighted in the July 29, 2021 edition of Pasadena Outlook Magazine!

» Click here to download the PDF (729 kb). 

Posted 3 months ago
Huntington Medical Research Institutes Launches Inaugural Biomedical Research STEM Program for Pasadena Unified School District Students
Post Date: July 20, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Student Programs

PASADENA, CA, July 20, 2021 – Eight 11th- and 12th-grade students from two Pasadena Unified School District high schools are having a blast while gaining potentially life-changing educational opportunities this summer in Huntington Medical Research Institutes’ (HMRI) inaugural Biomedical Research High School STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) program. Launched in June, the six-week program is providing invaluable opportunities for these students to learn from and collaborate with HMRI research scientists and staff, a STEM instructor and undergraduate teaching assistant (TA) mentors from three colleges and universities.

According to HMRI Associate Professor Dr. Nicole Purcell and director of HMRI’s inaugural high school STEM program, their mission is to educate and encourage the next generation of outstanding physicians, scientists and researchers to follow their interests and continue to grow and develop toward science-related careers. “HMRI’s STEM program, which is geared toward students who may not otherwise have access to top-tier interactive educational programs in these fields, is providing participants hands-on opportunities to explore new and uncharted solutions to some of healthcare’s biggest challenges, like heart disease, Alzheimer’s and mental illness – and have fun in the process,” Dr. Purcell said. 

Program instructor Jacqueline Fonseca, who is passionate about education, equal access and making real change happen in the field of science education in low-income communities, noted that classes convene virtually and “live” (as COVID-19 protocols allow), Mondays through Fridays, from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., through July 30.  “While we prefer meeting in person whenever possible, there are amazing virtual lab activities available now because of the need to be socially distant,” she said. “With so many different lab types available, students get experiences they might not otherwise be able to have in a lab setting.”

Fonseca elaborated that different subject matter is explored each week and includes: Research, Methods and Instrumentation; Anatomy (Brain, Heart, Lungs); Pathology and Imaging; Genetics; and Mental Health. The program will culminate with research projects and a July 30 symposium event.

Students also are benefitting from the oversight of HMRI Education Program Manager Dr. Carlos Aguirre and undergraduate TAs Ciannah Correa, Pomona College, B.S., Molecular Biology; Hunter McKenzie, Whitworth University, B.S., Health Science; and Sidhant Umbrajkar, University of California, Los Angeles, B.S., Biology.

Current student enrollees, who were selected for the program through an application process that included teacher recommendations, include: from CIS Academy – Skylar Adams (12th grade for Fall 2021) and Anthony Romero (11th grade for Fall 2021); and from Marshall Fundamental Secondary School – Haydee Angeles and Emily Martinez (12th grade for Fall 2021); and Elizabeth Alvarez, Arleth Angeles, Isaiah Gilmore and Amina Malone (11th grade for Fall 2021). 

Having already conducted dissections, explored the human anatomy using endoscopes with a laboratory “squishy human body” to simulate an endoscopy and toured HMRI’s labs, the students are giving the program rave reviews so far.

“We’re delighted that this program is being so well received by the students,” said HMRI President and CEO Julia E. Bradsher, Ph.D., M.B.A., M.S. “We can’t wait to see how this experience will impact the students – and long term how, through the seeds planted here, they will impact the world for good in the future.”

Dr. Bradsher added that start-up funds from Pasadena residents Drs. Sonia and Neil Singla, along with a three-year grant from The Confidence Foundation, have made HMRI’s STEM program for these Pasadena high school students possible.

Dr. Sonia Singla, HMRI board member and chief administrative officer for Pasadena-based Lotus Clinical Research, expressed her support for HMRI’s high school STEM program saying: “STEM has always been the future and it’s vital that all students have access to these types of programs. There is a generalized myth out there that science and technology is only for a certain type of student, and I want to debunk that and make STEM integral to all learners and curricula.

“I want kids to be exposed to STEM and demystify and normalize science and research,” she continued. “I want kids to know there is not just a prescribed path if they choose a career in science or medicine, there are many creative and innovative career choices in STEM! I’m thrilled HMRI chose to start a STEM program for local Pasadena kids ensuring ALL of our kids in our community have access and opportunities for a brighter future.”

Dr. Bradsher explained that over the past 40 years, HMRI has offered a Summer Research Program to some 515 undergraduate college students, many of whom have gone on to become physicians, scientists, engineers and researchers – some now holding prestigious faculty appointments at academic institutions around the world. “Thanks to the generosity of Drs. Singla and The Confidence Foundation grant, HMRI now is realizing its goal of making a greater impact in the community by expanding our summer programming to include underserved high school students. We couldn’t be more grateful to these generous donors.”

About HMRI

The scientists and staff of HMRI are powered by passion and determination, working tirelessly to uncover new and uncharted solutions to some of humankind’s most daunting cardiovascular and neurological challenges, like heart disease, Alzheimer’s, migraine and mental illness. Established in 1952, HMRI’s history is steeped in game-changing research and developments, from the cerebrospinal fluid shunt system for hydrocephalus, to the MRI spectroscopy for use with brain tumors, dementia, stroke, MS, and cancers. Today, our campus in Pasadena, CA, includes biomedical laboratories focused on the connections between the brain and heart, an MRI for clinical studies, and a Liver Center. Our mission is improving lives through biomedical research, and we invite those who share our passion to join us. Big‐impact, life‐changing solutions are happening today at HMRI. For more information, visit HMRI.org.

**

The eight Pasadena Unified School District high school students enrolled in HMRI's inaugural Biomedical Research High School STEM program, along with their STEM instructor, teaching assistants and HMRI's Education Program Manager are suited up for dissection day. Front row, left to right: Haydee Angeles, Elizabeth Alvarez, Isaiah Gilmore, Jacqueline Fonseca (STEM Instructor) Ciannah Correa (Teaching Assistant) and Dr. Carlos Aguirre (HMRI Education Program Manager). Back row, left to right: Anthony Romero, Emily Martinez, Arleth Angeles, Amina Malone and Skylar Adams.
The eight Pasadena Unified School District high school students enrolled in HMRI's inaugural Biomedical Research High School STEM program, along with their STEM instructor, teaching assistants and HMRI's Education Program Manager are suited up for dissection day. Front row, left to right: Haydee Angeles, Elizabeth Alvarez, Isaiah Gilmore, Jacqueline Fonseca (STEM Instructor) Ciannah Correa (Teaching Assistant) and Dr. Carlos Aguirre (HMRI Education Program Manager). Back row, left to right: Anthony Romero, Emily Martinez, Arleth Angeles, Amina Malone and Skylar Adams.
 
Skylar Adams uses a microscope to observe astrocytes, a type of brain cell important for axon guidance, synaptic support and control of the blood brain barrier and blood flow.   Isaiah Gilmore uses a microscope to observe astrocytes, a type of brain cell important for axon guidance, synaptic support, and control of the blood brain barrier and blood flow.
Skylar Adams uses a microscope to observe astrocytes, a type of brain cell important for axon guidance, synaptic support and control of the blood brain barrier and blood flow.
 
Isaiah Gilmore uses a microscope to observe astrocytes, a type of brain cell important for axon guidance, synaptic support, and control of the blood brain barrier and blood flow.
     
Emily Martinez marvels at the sight of the strawberry DNA extracted.
Emily Martinez marvels at the sight of the strawberry DNA extracted.
Posted 3 months ago
Pasadena NOW Article Features HMRI's STEM Program Launch
Post Date: July 20, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category:
Pasadena NOW featured the HMRI Stem program launch in it's July 20 edition. 
Posted 4 months ago
Study Reveals Impacts of COVID-19 on Emergency Care for Cardiac Events
Post Date: June 1, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Cardiovascular

As we begin to recover from the pandemic some of the impacts from COVID-19 are beginning to surface. HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner and colleagues conducted a study using data from the LA County emergency medical services registry to assess how the pandemic may have delayed emergent care and treatment for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and suspected damage from myocardial infarction. The results highlight the need for ongoing messaging and promotion for the public to not delay care during emergencies. Read more about the study and conclusions were published in June in the Journal of American Heart Association.  An accompanying editorial was also published - Death by COVID-19: An Open Investigation.

Date:  June 1, 2021

Title: Emergency Medical Services Responses to Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Suspected ST‐Segment–Elevation Myocardial Infarction During the COVID‐19 Pandemic in Los Angeles County

Authors: Jeffrey Eric Rollman MPH, NRP Robert A. Kloner MD, PhD , Nichole Bosson MD, MPH , James T. Niemann MD , Marianne Gausche‐Hill MD , Michelle Williams RN, MICN , Christine Clare RN , Weiyi Tan MD, MPH , Xiaoyan Wang PhD , David M. Shavelle MD , and Asim M. Rafique MD arafique@mednet.ucla.edu
Posted 5 months ago
Huntington Medical Research Institutes Welcomes New Board Members
Post Date: May 3, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: General News

Huntington Medical Research Institutes Welcomes New Board Members

Three New Members Bring Experience in Research, Educational Leadership, Community Service

PASADENA, CA, May 3, 2021 Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) welcomed three new members to its Board of Directors: Sandra B. Sharp, PhD, Barbara Hunt, EdD, and Uma Shrivistava. Each brings unique work and volunteer experience that will complement the melting pot of talents on HMRI’s Board of Directors – and shares a common passion for HMRI’s mission of improving lives through biomedical research.

“We’re thrilled to welcome Barbra, Sandy and Uma to our Board of Directors,” says Julia Bradsher, President and CEO of HMRI. “Each of these women brings leadership and experience that are integral to our strategy: seeking opportunities to engage with our community, and funding the important work that’s happening here. Their time and talents will be invaluable as we continue to shape this world-class research institute.”

Barbara Hunt, EdD

Education has been a lifelong passion for Barbara Hunt. She spent three decades as an educator herself, first teaching toddlers in West LA and eventually serving as Human Biology instructor at Woodbury University, her 10-year tenure sprinkled with lengthy trips across the globe to teach biology at colleges and universities in Malawi and Ghana. She earned her EdD in 2015 and completed a bioinformatics class in 2019, where she learned to use genetic databases to research diseases like measles, HIV and various cancers. “I find HMRI’s research areas extremely important for a healthy society,” says Dr. Hunt. “I look forward to promoting HMRI in the local Pasadena area, and I hope my involvement and enthusiasm might inspire others to support medical science and research.”  

Sandra B. Sharp, PhD

With a background rich in science and research, Sandy Sharp spent 27 years teaching biological sciences to students at Cal State LA. Today she is Professor Emerita, but even in retirement, her work continues, as she advances her molecular myogenesis research. Her career is peppered with impressive awards and achievements, including the NSF Career Advancement Award for Women in Science and Engineering and the Distinguished Women Award at Cal State LA. “I feel privileged and honored to be associated as a board member with HMRI,” says Dr. Sharp. “For me, it's a no-brainer. HMRI’s ground-breaking research impacts the lives of patients, and its contribution to the professional pipeline affords opportunities for biomedical scientists from diverse backgrounds and at all career stages. I look forward to using the experience I’ve accumulated in research and education to help keep HMRI strong and to solidify its role in the greater Pasadena community.”

 Uma Shrivistava

Uma Shrivistava has an entrepreneurial spirit coupled with extensive nonprofit board experience. Her 26 years as a small-business owner of an educational toys and books store overlapped with 20 years of executive roles in banking and finance for Bank of America. Somehow she found time to serve on several boards as well, most recently as president and board member for Women at Work in Pasadena. “I am excited about joining HMRI’s Board of Directors,” says Ms. Shrivistava. “Their scientists are world renowned, and the research they are driving is game-changing. I hope my experience will be helpful in guiding HMRI on their path to greater community engagement and nonprofit fundraising goals.” 

Dr. Hunt, Dr. Sharp and Ms. Shrivistava will join 22 other members on HMRI’s Board of Directors. All give generously of their time, talents and finances, and each brings a unique skillset that is integral to the institutes’ growth and success. Board members chair and serve on nine different committees, host events and spearhead fundraising efforts. “We are grateful to have the steadfast, hands-on support of our Board of Directors,” says Bradsher. “These volunteers share our passion and commitment to exploring new and uncharted means of diagnosing and treating disease. Each is a true champion of the cause: improving lives through scientific research.”

About HMRI

 The scientists and staff of HMRI are powered by passion and determination, working tirelessly to uncover new and uncharted solutions to some of humankind’s most daunting cardiovascular and neurological challenges, like heart disease, Alzheimer’s, migraine and mental illness. Established in 1952, HMRI’s history is steeped in game-changing research and developments, from the cerebrospinal fluid shunt system for hydrocephalus, to the MRI spectroscopy for use with brain tumors, dementia, stroke, MS, and cancers. Today, our campus in Pasadena, CA, includes biomedical laboratories focused on the connections between the brain and heart, an MRI for clinical studies, and a Liver Center. Our mission is improving lives through biomedical research, and we invite those who share our passion to join us. Big‐impact, life‐changing solutions are happening today at HMRI. For more information, visit Hmri.org.

Posted 5 months ago
HMRI Neuroscience Research Team and USC Alzheimer's Disease Collaboration published in "Molecular Neurodegeneration"
Post Date: May 3, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Neuroscience

The prestigous journal Molecular Neurodegeneration published a HMRI & USC manuscript showcasing that people who carry the high-risk gene Apoe4 for Alzheimer's disease have higher inflammation due to increased levels of an enzyme known as phospholipase A2. This enzyme is considered a biomarker and is a target for treating Alzheimer's disease. The article published in April and titled, "Calcium-dependent cytosolic phospholipase A2 activation is implicated in neuroinflammation and oxidative stress associated with ApoE4," includes work from our very own Alfred Fonteh, PHD, Neurosciences, Senior Research Biochemist.

  • Article Citiation: Wang, S., Li, B., Solomon, V. et al. Calcium-dependent cytosolic phospholipase A2 activation is implicated in neuroinflammation and oxidative stress associated with ApoE4. Mol Neurodegeneration 16, 26 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13024-021-00438-3 
  • Authors: Shaowei Wang1, Boyang Li1, Victoria Solomon1, Alfred Fonteh2, Stanley I. Rapoport3, David A. Bennett4, Zoe Arvanitakis4, Helena C. Chui1, Carol Miller1, Patrick M. Sullivan5, Hoau-Yan Wang6,7 and Hussein N. Yassine1*
Posted 5 months ago
New research suggests possible treatment for common issues in myopia and aging - eye "floaters."
Post Date: April 27, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Neuroscience

"Floaters" are a challenging but common issue in myopia and aging. In the clinical world they are referred to as vitreous opacities and develop as a result of collagen fibers that have massed together and create a shadow on the retina. In this study, a team of researchers including Dr. Michael Harrington, scientific director for the HMRI neuroscience program, seek treatments that directly address the collagen build up. Read the paper published April 27, 2021 in the journal Nanoscale Horizons titled - "Carbon quantum dots as a dual platform for the inhibition and light-based destruction of collagen fibers: implications for the treatment of eye floaters."

https://doi.org/10.1039/d1nh00157d

 

 

Posted 6 months ago
HMRI Neuroscience Researcher Leads International Experts in Summary of State-of-art Detection of Early Dementia.
Post Date: April 15, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Neuroscience

HMRI neuroscience researcher Xianghong Arakaki contributes to international experts' teamwork in two new papers that summarize the state-of-the-art detection of early dementia. These analyses illuminate changes that are captured by simply observing brain waves when individuals are resting, using equipment (EEG) that is not expensive. The EEG measures brain activity as distinct from brain structural changes, which is important because the function may change before structural changes are visible. Both papers may be used to guide clinical trials of new therapies for Alzheimer's and other dementias and are team efforts with the Alzheimer's Association's Electrophysiology Professional Interest Areas (PIA) group. 

  • Paper 1: EEG measures for clinical research in major vascular cognitive impairment: recommendations by an expert panel; Neurobiol. Aging. 2021 Mar 10;103:78-97. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2021.03.003.  In this paper, a multidisciplinary expert panel reviewed the literature and reached consensus (endorsed by the Electrophysiology Professional Interest Area (EPIA) of Alzheimer’s Association and Global Brain Consortium) about resting EEG measures associated with clinical phenotypes and neuroimaging biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) clinical trials. 

 

Posted 6 months ago
HMRI Brain Aging Study Sheds Light on How Our Eyes May Signal Early AD Markers
Post Date: March 29, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Neuroscience

It is important to detect damage from Alzheimer's disease (AD) before memories are lost, and HMRI's Neurosciences research team are testing approaches to pick up early AD. Doheny Eye Center colleagues demonstrate, for the first time, that altered electrical signals from the eye can predict those individuals in our Brain Aging study whose abnormal amyloid biomarkers in spinal fluid identify them at greater risk for AD. Retinal nerve signals may offer a simpler screen than spinal fluid to identify individuals for testing treatments to prevent further brain damage. Read the full paper published March 18, 2021 in the "Scientific Reports" section of Nature.com. 

 

Posted 7 months ago
HMRI Cardiovascular Team and NIH Investigators Publish Paper on E-cigarettes and Cardiopulmonary Health
Post Date: March 22, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Cardiovascular

In conjunction with NIH investigators, HMRI's Cardiovascular team led by Dr. Robert Kloner, is pleased to share their published paper and latest research and remaining questions on the impacts of E-cigarettes on the heart and lungs. With the popularty of E-cigarettes growing, especially in teens and young adults, it's clear that regular research is critical as we aim to better understand the short- and long-term impacts. Read the full article here. 

 

Posted 7 months ago
Weighing the pros and cons of cannabis; Dr. Kloner says more studies needed.
Post Date: March 19, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Cardiovascular

HMRI’s Dr. Robert Kloner addresses study results on the use of cannabis to lower blood pressure, stating there is a need for more studies on the health benefits of cannabis while also learning how to counteract any of the negative impacts from THC.  Read more in the Green Entrepreneur article.

Posted 7 months ago
HMRI Neuroscience Team Closer to Understanding Migraines
Post Date: March 18, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Neuroscience

Why migraine happens is not understood. However, HMRI’s neuroscience team’s most recent study reveals that there are specific changes in molecules within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during migraine. One of them, sVCAM-1, changes more in those who have more frequent migraine. These results identify part of the major brain phenomenon of migraine and stimulate more efforts to understand what is going on and what needs to be corrected for better treatment. Read the full article in the journal Headache, entitled Evidence that blood–CSF barrier transport, but not inflammatory biomarkers, change in migraine, while CSF sVCAM1 associates with migraine frequency and CSF fibrinogen.

Posted 7 months ago
Dr. Kloner Weighs in on Red Wine and Your Heart
Post Date: March 17, 2021   Author: Katie Robbins   Category: Cardiovascular

HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner shares that the scientific evidence is still unclear as to whether or not red wine is good for your heart in a March 17 article in Yahool Lifestyle News - The Worst Reason to Drink Wine, says Science. While some studies have suggested that drinking red wine can lower your blood pressure and reduce your risk of heart attacks and stroke, the concern is that the findings may have been overblown. Dr. Kloner says more research is needed to determine specifically which factors are responsible for the decreased blood pressure. In the meantime, stick to the current recommendations when drinking any alcohol, even red wine - one glass for women, two glasses for men. 

 

Posted 8 months ago
HMRI Research Team's Study Shows Impact of Liver Cirrhosis on the Brain
Post Date: January 26, 2021   Author: brivas   Category: brain

Liver Cirrhosis can cause widespread damage for patients, including deposits of manganese, a trace mineral, which can affect the brain. Manganese is a key mineral used by our bodies for a variety of chemical processes, including the metabolism of cholesterol and carbohydrates, but people only need it in small amounts. The HMRI research team, including Neurosciences Scientific Director Michael Harrington, MD, showed that damage from liver cirrhosis gives an altered signal intensity consistent with increased manganese deposition on MRI, which was not found in healthy controls. This method may help quantify and track treatment in patients with cirrhosis.
Title: MRI Automated T1 Signal Intensity Detection of Diffuse Brain Manganese Accumulation in Cirrhosis
By: Journal of NeuroImaging

Author: Ke Wei , Thao T. Tran, Patrick W. Chang, Annie Malekie, Karen Chu, Lea Alhilali, Matthew T. Borzage, Edward Mena, Michael G. Harrington, and Kevin S. King

Date: Jan/Feb 2021 

Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jon.12781

Posted 9 months ago
HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner weighs in on air pollution as an acute trigger for heart attacks.
Post Date: January 18, 2021   Author: brivas   Category: attack
Research from China published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology adds additional color to scientific data that suggests air pollution can be an acute risk factor for heart attacks. The study was picked up by TCTMD, where HMRI's Chief Science Officer and Scientific Director of Cardiovascular Research, Robert Kloner, MD, was asked to weigh in on the topic. One area of Dr. Kloner's work has been to investigate how reducing heart attack triggers can reduce the size of heart attacks and ultimately decrease deaths. He agrees that the research further points to the concept that acute triggers like air pollution can increase heart attack risks and death.

Title: Acute Exposure to Air Pollution Can Trigger MI-Related Death

By: TCTMD by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation

Author: Caitlin E. Cox

Date: January 18, 2021

Link: https://www.tctmd.com/news/acute-exposure-air-pollution-can-trigger-mi-related-death

Posted 9 months ago
Heart inflammation resulting from COVID-19 reviewed by Dr. Robert Kloner in Science Direct article.
Post Date: January 8, 2021   Author: brivas   Category: cardiovascular
36% Of patients with COVID-19 end up battling myocarditis, a viral infection causing inflammation in the heart. In a recently published article in Science Direct's Trends In Cardiovascular Medicine, HMRI's Chief Science Officer and Scientific Director of Cardiovascular Research, Robert Kloner, MD, and Marshfield Clinic Health System's cardiovascular physician and researcher Shereif Rezkalla, MD, explain how to diagnosis and treat viral myocarditis.

Title: Viral myocarditis: 1917–2020: From the influenza A to the COVID-19 pandemics

By: Science Direct's Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine

Author: Robert Kloner, MD and Shereif Rezkalla, MD

Date: December 29, 2020

Link: https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/936214

Posted 9 months ago
HMRI's Dr. Anju Vasudevan explains two vascular treatments for mental illness in recent article.
Post Date: January 8, 2021   Author: brivas   Category: anju
What do mental illness & the vascular system have to do with one another? HMRI's Senior Research Scientist and Scientific Director of Angiogenesis and Brain Development Research Dr. Anju Vasudevan shares how we can fight mental illness in prenatal, postnatal and adult brains using two vascular therapies in this recent article.

Title: Vascular Therapies for Mental Health Disorders

By: Open Access Government

Author: Anju Vasudevan, MD

Date: December 16, 2020

Link: https://www.openaccessgovernment.org/adult-brain/100309/

2020

Posted 10 months ago
HMRI Neurosciences Researchers Original Research on the Role of Membrane Lipids in Alzheimer's Disease Published in Frontiers in Neuroscience
Post Date: December 16, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: ad

Huntington Medical Research Institutes' (HMRI) neurosciences research team led by senior researcher Alfred N. Fonteh had their original research on the impact of deteriorating  membrane lipids in Alzheimer's disease (AD) published in Frontiers in Neuroscience. Incomplete knowledge of brain lipid composition limits mechanistic insight into late-onset AD pathophysiology. Since age is the most significant risk factor of AD, the HMRI team propose that older neuronal cells render the amyloid precursor protein more vulnerable to abnormal processing because of deteriorating membrane lipids. We compared the lipid composition of cognitively healthy (CH) participants with normal Aß42/Tau (CH-NAT), CH with pathological Aß42/Tau (CH-PAT), and AD. We found differential metabolism of lipids in the supernatant fluid and nanoparticulate membrane fractions of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Whereas phosphatidylcholine accumulates in the supernatant fluid fraction, sphingomyelin accumulates in the CH-PAT group’s nanoparticulate membrane fraction. Phospholipase A2 activity that hydrolyzes lipids is higher in AD than in the cognitively healthy groups. Sphingomyelinase activities that hydrolyze sphingomyelin are lower in AD compared to the healthy groups. Similar fasting blood and dietary lipid levels in the three clinical groups are consistent with the CSF lipid changes originating from brain pathophysiology. Our results identify increased lipid turnover in cognitively healthy participants with AD biomarkers, switching to a predominantly lipolytic state in dementia. This knowledge may be useful for targeting and testing new AD treatments.

TITLE: Accumulation of Cerebrospinal Fluid Glycerophospholipids and Sphingolipids in Cognitively Healthy Participants With Alzheimer’s Biomarkers Precedes Lipolysis in the Dementia Stage

By: Frontiers in Neuroscience

Article type: Original Research

Authors: Alfred N Fonteh, Abby J Chiang, Xianghong Arakaki, Sarah Edminster, Michael G Harrington

Manuscript ID: 611393

Date: December 16, 2020

Link: Full Article in Frontiers in Neuroscience

Posted 11 months ago
Preclinical Study: Use of Nicotine Near or at Time of Heart Attack Increases Damage
Post Date: November 17, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: attack

A HMRI preclinical study points to nicotine use near or at the time of a heart attack can further increase the size of the heart attack resulting in a more significant impact on recovery. Nicotine, a major component of tobacco smoke and also often added to e-liquid, has long been associated with high blood pressure and cardiac events. However, in this study HMRI's Chief Science Officer Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD, Neurosciences Science Director Michael Harrington MB, ChB, FRCP, and their team have uncovered that research subjects exposed to nicotine during or close to the time of their experimentally induced heart attack increased their blood pressure causing larger heart attacks that kill off more heart cells and further reduce the heart's ability to pump.

Title: Acute administration of nicotine induces transient elevation of blood pressure and increases myocardial infarct size...

By: ScienceDirect

Date: November 16, 2020

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2405844020322933  

Posted 1 years ago
Neuroscience Researchers’ Pilot Study Reveal Abnormal Gamma Power in At-risk Populations for Alzheimer’s Disease, results published in Frontiers In Aging Neuroscience
Post Date: October 15, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: 2020

Gamma as high frequency brain activities are involved in attention, senses (smell, sight, and hearing), mental processing, and perception, which change in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To unmask abnormal gamma power in healthy individuals at high-risk of developing AD, HMRI’s neurosciences researcher Xianghong Arakaki MD, PhD (NIA R56AG063857) led the electrophysiology core of a brain aging study that combined memory challenge with quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG). The pilot findings encourage further investigations in developing neurophysiology-based markers for identifying individuals at risk, to help improve our understanding of AD pathophysiology and were published in Frontiers In Aging Neurosciences. The brain aging study was led by Michael Harrington, MB, ChB, FRCP (L. K. Whittier Foundation).

Title: Compromised Behavior and Gamma Power During Working Memory in Cognitively Healthy Individuals With Abnormal CSF Amyloid/Tau

By: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience

Authors: Rochart Roger, Liu Quanying, Fonteh Alfred N., Harrington Michael G., Arakaki Xianghong

Date: 14 October, 2020

Link: https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnagi.2020.574214 

Site Source: Front. Aging Neurosci., 14 October 2020 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2020.574214

Posted 1 years ago
Prenatal NAD+ treatment can rescue abnormal brain development and prevent the origin of mental illness; results published in Science Advances Magazine.
Post Date: October 10, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: 2020
Results from an angiogenesis study, led by our own Dr. Anju Vasudevan, were published October 9 in Science Advances. The study shows that mental illness can be prevented by administering nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to the prenatal forebrain blood vessels, resulting in repair of angiogenesis defects and normalization of brain development.
Title: NAD+-mediated rescue of prenatal forebrain angiogenesis restores postnatal behavior By: Science Advances Magazine Source Site: BY SIVAN SUBBURAJUSARAH KAYEYONG KEE CHOIJUGAJYOTI BARUAHDEBKANYA DATTAJUN RENASHWIN SRINIVASAN KUMARGABOR SZABODAI FUKUMURARAKESH K. JAINABDALLAH ELKHALANJU VASUDEVAN Date: October 9, 2020 Link: https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/41/eabb9766
Posted 1 years ago
ScienceDaily shares HMRI/UCI Vaping Study: "Heating in vaping device as cause for lung injury, study shows"
Post Date: September 30, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: Uncategorized
ScienceDaily shared early results from the e-cigarette and vaping product study led by Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD, chief science officer for Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) and professor of Medicine at USC, and Michael Kleinman, PhD, professor of occupational and environmental medicine at the University of California, Irvine’s School of Medicine and member of the UCI Center for Occupational and Environmental Health. The study, which aimed to explore the effect of e-cigarette and other vaping product use on the cardiovascular system, showed that the heating element in vaping devices can cause lung injury. Title: Heating in vaping device as cause for lung injury, study shows; Nicotine, THC or Vitamin E oil may not be the primary factor in e-cig or vaping product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) By: ScienceDaily Source Site: University of California - Irvine. "Heating in vaping device as cause for lung injury, study shows: Nicotine, THC or Vitamin E oil may not be the primary factor in e-cig or vaping product use-associated lung injury (EVALI)." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 September 2020. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/09/200928163756.htm>. Date: September 28, 2020 Link: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/09/200928163756.htm
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI & UCI E-cig/Vaping Study Uncover Factor in Lung Injury; Results Published in Journal of American Heart Association
Post Date: September 24, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: american heart

Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD Early results of an experimental vaping study have shown significant lung injury from E-cigarette (eC) devices with nickel-chromium alloy heating elements and were published in the Journal of American Heart Association. Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD, chief science officer for Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) and professor of Medicine at USC, and Michael Kleinman, PhD, professor of occupational and environmental medicine at the University of California, Irvine’s School of Medicine and member of the UCI Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, led the study which was designed to explore the effect of e-cigarette and other vaping product use on the cardiovascular system.  While conducting experiments, researchers observed eC or vaping product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) immediately after switching from a vaping device with a stainless steel heating element, to one that used nickel-chromium alloy (NC). The findings were consistent, with or without the use of nicotine, vitamin E oil or tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which have previously been thought to contribute to the life-threatening respiratory problem. The study was funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. In addition to Kleinman and Kloner, several researchers participated in the study, including HMRI researchers Jianru Shi, Wangde Dai, Juan Carreno, Jesus Chavez, and Lifu Zhao; and UCI researchers Rebecca Johnson Arechavala, David Herman, Irene Hasen and Amanda Ting.

TITLE: E‐cigarette or Vaping Product Use–Associated Lung Injury Produced in an Animal Model From Electronic Cigarette Vapor Exposure Without Tetrahydrocannabinol or Vitamin E Oil

By: Journal of American Heart Association

Date: September 8, 2020

Link: https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.120.017368 

Press Release: https://hmri.org/dev/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/HMRI-UCI-JAHA-Vaping-Final-002.pdf
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Michael Harrington Discusses Key Findings in Migraine Study in Medscape Interview
Post Date: August 25, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: choroid

Scientific Director of Neuroscience at HMRI, Dr. Michael Harrington, was interviewed by Medscape regarding his recent migraine study presentation at the virtual annual meeting of the American Headache Society. The breakthrough data suggests that the choroid plexuses, a special brain structure that produces spinal fluid, is the primary source of an increased molecule in people suffering from migraines. While more research is needed, these results shed light on an area of focus and could lead to improved treatments long term.

Title: Choroid Plexuses May Play a Role in Migraine

By: Medscape

Author: Jim Kling

Date:  August 24, 2020

Link: https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/936214

Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Robert Kloner mentioned in USA Today about COVID and the safety of college football
Post Date: August 18, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: college
HMRI’s Chief Science Officer and Scientific Director of Cardiovascular Research, Dr. Robert A. Kloner, talks about COVID and the safety of college football. Title: Same data. Same research. But different conclusions on safety of college football By: USA Today Author: Josh Peter Date: August 18, 2020 Link: https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/ncaaf/2020/08/18/college-football-experts-safety-covid-19-coronavirus-differently/3390193001/
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Neurosciences Team co-published a research paper in Nature
Post Date: August 16, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: alzheimer's
Title: APOE4 leads to blood–brain barrier dysfunction predicting cognitive decline Date: April 29, 2020 Link: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2247-3 The APOE4 gene increases risk for Alzheimer's disease in about 15% of the population by damaging pericytes, special cells that normally protect the blood–brain-barrier. With our colleagues at USC, we find that early cognitive decline with breakdown of this barrier in individuals with the APOE4 gene is independent of Alzheimer’s amyloid and tau pathology. This research highlights that pericyte damage may be a personalized therapeutic target to treat Alzheimer's disease in 15% of the population.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner published commentary in PracticeUpdate about the use of marijuana on cardiovascular health
Post Date: August 13, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: cardiovascular
Title: Medical Marijuana, Recreational Cannabis, and Cardiovascular Health Date: August 13, 2020 Link: https://www.practiceupdate.com/content/medical-marijuana-recreational-cannabis-and-cardiovascular-health/104835/65/2/1 This commentary reviews the recent statement from the American Heart Association that HMRI participated in, that raises concern about the adverse effects cannabis can have on the cardiovascular system.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Robert Kloner co-published an article in the American Heart Association’s Journal Circulation
Post Date: August 7, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: american
Title: Medical Marijuana, Recreational Cannabis, and Cardiovascular Health: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Date: August 5, 2020 Link: https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000883 There has been controversy about the effects of marijuana on the heart. HMRI is honored to have contributed to a statement by the American Heart Association that addresses this important public health issue. In this paper we review the good and bad elements of marijuana but do call for more prospective research studies in this field, as more and more states legalize the use of marijuana.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Robert Kloner mentioned in Salon article about effects of marijuana on the cardiovascular system
Post Date: August 6, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: cardiovascular
HMRI’s Chief Science Officer and Scientific Director of Cardiovascular Research, Dr. Robert A. Kloner, talks about the effects of marijuana on the cardiovascular system. Title: New study links marijuana to cardiovascular disease — but it's not all bad news By: Salon Author: Matthew Rozsa Date: August 6, 2020 Link: https://www.salon.com/2020/08/05/new-study-links-marijuana-to-cardiovascular-disease--but-its-not-all-bad-news/
Posted 1 years ago
Media Release: Human forebrain endothelial cell therapy for psychiatric disorders
Post Date: July 27, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: brain

Date: July 27, 2020 Link to Published Article: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41380-020-0839-9 Link to News Release: https://hmri.org/dev/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/HMRI-Press-Release-RE-Vasudevan-Published-Final-MSM.pdf   Anju Vasudevan, PhD, Senior Research Scientist and Scientific Director for the Angiogenesis and Brain Development research program at HMRI, and her colleagues’ work published on July 13 in Molecular Psychiatry* is considered to be a game-changing breakthrough uncovering why cell-based therapies are failing, and providing a missing link in the process, that when the right vascular cells are paired with neuronal cells, they work together successfully for brain repair and improvement of disease symptoms. While studying the mechanics of the cells, Vasudevan and her team discovered that GABAergic neuronal cells must be paired with their vascular counterpart, the embryonic forebrain specific endothelial cells for faster, effective therapy.

“In short,” says Vasudevan, “we were able to replicate the close neurovascular interactions of the developing forebrain and prove their critical role in guiding the GABAergic interneurons to their final destination in the adult brain.”
The study used a GABA pathway component - the GABAA receptor beta 3 subunit (GABRB3) to isolate and generate a new human vascular cell product. This human vasculature is unique to the embryonic forebrain and distinct from vasculature in other organs, one of the many critical findings from Vasudevan’s work at HMRI that will aide scientists in the longer journey to use cell-based therapies for brain disorders.

Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Neurosciences Team co-published a research paper in EBioMedicine
Post Date: July 23, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: alzheimer's
Title: Brain delivery of supplemental docosahexaenoic acid (DHA): A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial Date: July 17, 2020 Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352396420302589 Omega 3 supplements are lost from the brain in Alzheimer's disease and it was not clear if oral supplements even reach the brain. This study with our colleagues at USC tested if high doses of omega-3 in the form of DHA caplets get into the spinal fluid. We found that high doses are needed to enter the brain fluid especially for individuals with the main genetic risk factor of ApoE-4. Follow on studies will test if this level of supplementation slows the loss of memory from early Alzheimer's disease.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI Observes Juneteenth as Paid Employee Holiday
Post Date: June 18, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: hmri
In observance of Juneteenth, HMRI will be closed on Friday, June 19, 2020. This is a paid holiday for all HMRI employees. Juneteenth (aka Freedom Day, Jubilee Day, and Cel-Liberation Day) is a holiday celebrated annually on June 19th to commemorate the emancipation of enslaved people in the U.S.
Posted 1 years ago
A Message to Our HMRI Community
Post Date: June 4, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News
Posted 1 years ago
Coronavirus (COVID-19) June Update
Post Date: June 1, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News

June 1, 2020

Dear Friends of HMRI, As the situation with the coronavirus pandemic continues to evolve, I want to take a moment to share an update: HMRI is tracking daily information and following guideline provided by Centers for Disease Control (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), and Los Angeles health authorities. With this in mind, the following guidelines are in effect at HMRI until further notice:
  • Our emergency/safety team has put in a place a work from home policy for those able to work from home
  • Our research and experiments continue. Our laboratory scientists and technicians are working staggered hours in the laboratory to minimize the number of personnel in the laboratories at any given time; they are following social distancing guidelines, working no less than 6 feet apart. They all wear Personal Protective Equipment (lab coats, glasses, gloves) and wash their hands thoroughly after leaving the lab.
We are pleased to be offering our monthly lectures via Zoom webinar presentations! The Bob Mackin Scientific Lecture Series and Researchers Roundtable are scheduled for later in June. If you’d like to receive notifications of these talks, please visit https://hmri.org/hmri-lecture-series/ or email us at info@hmri.org. For 66 years, HMRI has been training the Next Generation of Scientists with its Summer Student Internship program. Though modified this summer, this highly regarded program starts on June 15th. Please click here to learn about this summer’s program. Thank you for visiting our website! Stay safe and please check back for periodic updates.   Sincerely, Julia E. Bradsher, Ph.D., MBA President and CEO
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Kevin King co-published an article with USC in the Scientific Reports (Nature) Journal
Post Date: May 29, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: aorta
Title: Dynamic Effects of Aortic Arch Stiffening on Pulsatile Energy Transmission to Cerebral Vasculature as A Determinant of Brain-Heart Coupling Date: May 29, 2020 Link: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-65616-7 Drs. Kevin King and Niema Pahlevan published a work shedding new insights into how arteriosclerosis damages the brain.  Dr. King’s prior work has shown that stiffening in the aorta is a better predictor of brain vascular health than current clinical assessments like blood pressure and lipids.  In this work, we employed advanced models to show how stiffening of the aorta results in excess harmful high blood pressure being transmitted to the brain.  This work is important as for unclear reasons, current measures of vascular risk have not been helpful in assessing risk of people later in life for dementia.  
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Neurosciences Team co-published an article in PLOS ONE
Post Date: May 29, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: ad
Title: Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness predicts CSF amyloid/tau before cognitive decline Date: May 29, 2020 Link: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0232785 Damage causing Alzheimer's disease (AD) starts long before memories are lost. Our Doheny/UCLA collaborators used a special camera (OCT) in our cognitively healthy Brain Aging study participants to test if early damage could be seen in the eye. Optic nerve fiber size predicted who had early AD signs (our USC colleagues measured spinal fluid amyloid and tau) with 87% sensitivity, suggesting this might become a useful and simple screen for AD.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Advanced Imaging and Cardiovascular Research Teams co-published a paper in SAGE Open Medicine
Post Date: May 26, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: blood
Title: The association of nadir CD4-T cell count and endothelial dysfunction in a healthy HIV cohort without major cardiovascular risk factors Date: May 26, 2020 Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2050312120924892 HIV infection damages many parts of the body.  Modern medications are now able to control the virus so it is not detectable in the blood, but it is never entirely cleared from the body.  We were concerned that even with proper treatment, people who had a prior history of HIV infection with damage to the immune system would have persistent damage to the blood vessels- making them at increased risk of heart attack, stroke and dementia.  Using a sensitive test we were able to identify this damage to the blood vessels even though other clinical parameters like blood pressure were normal.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Neurosciences and Advanced Imaging Research Teams co-published an article in PLOS ONE
Post Date: April 22, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: acids
Title: Urine dicarboxylic acids change in pre-symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease and reflect loss of energy capacity and hippocampal volume Date: April 16, 2020 Link: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0231765 We find that small fatty acids in the urine, called DCAs, are excreted more in the urine from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and volunteers who have early AD biomarkers than from healthy controls.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Robert Kloner mentioned in American Heart Association News article about the need for more research on marijuana and its effect on the heart
Post Date: April 20, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: heart
Title: As marijuana use grows, researchers want to know how it affects the heart By: American Heart Association News Date: April 20, 2020 Link: https://www.heart.org/en/news/2020/04/20/as-marijuana-use-grows-researchers-want-to-know-how-it-affects-the-heart
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI's Cardiovascular Team published an article in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Post Date: April 16, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: anesthetic
Title: Different Effects of Volatile and Nonvolatile Anesthetic Agents on Long-Term Survival in an Experimental Model of Hemorrhagic Shock Date: April 15, 2020 Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1074248420919221 Hemorrhagic shock is a major cause of mortality in soldiers and civilians undergoing trauma. In this study from the Cardiovascular Group at HMRI, Dr. Dai et al explored the concept that a cardioprotective volatile anesthetic agent, previously shown to reduce the size of experimental heart attacks, was superior to standard IV anesthetic in reducing mortality in an experimental model of hemorrhagic shock. This finding has important clinical implications for those undergoing surgery for trauma and experiencing hemorrhagic shock.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Michael Harrington co-authors article in the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association
Post Date: April 16, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: fluid
Title: A novel sensitive assay for detection of a biomarker of pericyte injury in cerebrospinal fluid Date: April 16, 2020 Link: https://alz-journals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/alz.12061 This study reports a method to detect a molecule in spinal fluid that leaks from brain blood vessel pericytes in early Alzheimer's disease.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Advisory
Post Date: March 17, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: 2020
As of March 19, 2020, HMRI will be ceasing normal operations, until further notice, due to the current COVID-19 health crisis. The wellbeing of our employees is our number one priority. HMRI employees will be working remotely and still accessible during this time. Thank you for your continued support of HMRI! We will post any updates as new information warrants.
March 17, 2020 HMRI is tracking daily information and following guidelines provided by Centers for Disease Control (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), and Greater Los Angeles government authorities.  To be fully prepared and preventive, we have implemented the following at HMRI until further notice:
  • Our emergency/safety team has put in a place a work from home policy for those able to work from home
  • Our research and experiments will continue to keep our science moving forward. Our laboratory scientists and technicians are working staggered hours in the laboratory to minimize the number of personnel in the laboratories at any given time; they are following social distancing guidelines. All lab personnel wear personal protective equipment (PPE) (lab coats, glasses, gloves) and wash their hands thoroughly and often.
  • All study participants and visitors are not allowed into our buildings until further notice.
  • All public events, lectures and programs have been cancelled at least through the end of March and will likely extend into April.
  • All meetings, including board meetings, committee meetings, and others, will be held as video/teleconferences.
Thank you for your continued support of HMRI!  We will update this message periodically as new information warrants.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Advanced Imaging Team co-published a paper in the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Journal
Post Date: February 24, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: aortic
Title: Group delay method for MRI aortic pulse wave velocity measurements in clinical protocols with low temporal resolution: Validation in a heterogeneous cohort Date: February 24, 2020 Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0730725X19306599 The novelty of our work stems from using advanced analysis techniques to be able to accurately assess aortic stiffness from standard clinical MRI scans.  The presence of aortic stiffness increases risk for for heart attack and stroke.  Our prior work has shown that aortic stiffness also damages the brain directly which increases risk for dementia.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI's Neuroscience Team published an article in Frontiers in Physiology Journal
Post Date: February 14, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: acids
Title: Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Composition of Cerebrospinal Fluid Fractions Shows Their Contribution to Cognitive Resilience of a Pre-symptomatic Alzheimer’s Disease Cohort Date: February 14, 2020 Link: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphys.2020.00083/full We tested our hypothesis that omega-3 fatty acids can prevent cognitive decline using spinal fluids from healthy study participants compared with participants with high risks of developing Alzheimer’s Disease. Our studies show omega-3 differences between these groups, suggesting that brain omega-3 is associated cognitive performance. We propose that approaches that prevent brain depletion of omega-3 fatty acids may prevent cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s by interfering with the toxicity of amyloid plaques.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner published a paper in the Journal of the American Heart Association
Post Date: February 4, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: blood
Title: Stunned and Hibernating Myocardium: Where Are We Nearly 4 Decades Later? Date: February 4, 2020 Link: https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.119.015502 This paper is a 40 year update of the phenomenon of the stunned myocardium, a term I coined back in 1982 with Dr. Eugene Braunwald when I was at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. The concept refers to the observation that brief periods of low blood flow to the heart can result in prolonged recovery of contractile function of the heart muscle, even after blood flow has been restored. It is important as stunned myocardium can lead to heart failure. In this new article we update the concept as well as another similar concept, hibernating myocardium, which also can lead to heart failure.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Michael Harrington co-published an article in Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience Journal
Post Date: February 4, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: brain
Title: Regulation of CSF and Brain Tissue Sodium Levels by the Blood-CSF and Blood-Brain Barriers During Migraine Date: February 4, 2020 Link: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fncom.2020.00004/full First ever modeling of where brain sodium fluctuation arises. We did this because we have found brain sodium increases in migraine. We asked whether the increased sodium comes from the brain blood supply or from choroid plexuses. The answer is overwhelmingly from the choroid plexuses. This becomes a potential target to treat migraine.  
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner mentioned in Elder Advisory Group blog post
Post Date: January 28, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News
Title: A Last-Minute Heart Health Reminder for Super Bowl Sunday Date: January 28, 2020 Link: https://www.elderadvisorygroup.com/2020/01/28/a-last-minute-heart-health-reminder-for-super-bowl-sunday/  
Posted 1 years ago
Media Release: HMRI Receives W. M. Keck Foundation Grant to Study Fluctuating Brain Function
Post Date: January 15, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: award from the w
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 15, 2020  

HMRI Receives W. M. Keck Foundation Grant to Study Fluctuating Brain Function

Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) announced today a $1 million, three-year award from the W. M. Keck Foundation to help support research into a deeper understanding of fluctuating sodium in the nervous system as the root cause of fluctuating brain function.  The project will leverage HMRI’s pioneering neurosciences program that has undertaken longitudinal studies of the brain and nervous system over the past 20 years. “We are thrilled to receive this prestigious award from the W. M. Keck Foundation to fund this futuristic study”, said, Dr. Julia E. Bradsher, President and CEO of HMRI.  She further stated, “if successful, the results and their implications will be an enormous leap forward in explaining how brain fluctuations arise in both health and disease.  This truly is a great achievement for HMRI, our scientific team in the neurosciences, and our collaborators.” In this project, HMRI proposes that fluctuations of sodium in cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue will alter neuronal firing rates and thus impact brain functions, whose features vary depending on the site of the fluctuation and the health of the neurons. In a healthy brain, this will change the normal synchronization between neural circuits that might then manifest as fluctuations in mood, alertness, or cognitive abilities. The study extends findings from previous research on fluctuations underlying migraine to other brain fluctuations, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD).  In the prior studies, it is suggested that sodium fluctuation may cause imperfect synchronization of brain regions, leading to abnormal sensory perception as in migraine, or difficulty recalling memories, slower problem solving, and poor decision making. “We get to test a theory that can impact everyone by explaining how brain functions fluctuate and identifying a target to correct deviations”, said Dr. Michael B. Harrington, Scientific Director of the HMRI Neurosciences Program and principal investigator on this new project.  “We are thrilled and honored to get this peer-reviewed award as our idea would be too unconventional for normal federal funding review processes.” Along with Dr. Harrington, the research will be conducted by an interdisciplinary team of scientists, including Dr. Brian Stoltz, a chemistry researcher from the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) and Dr. Linda Petzold, a mathematician at University of California, Santa Barbara. For interviews, please contact Brenda Rivas at Brenda.Rivas@hmri.org or 626-807-7079.   About HMRI Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI), founded in 1952, is an independent, non-profit organization with the mission to improve lives through patient-focused scientific research. HMRI conducts internationally recognized research in the areas of neuroscience (migraine, Alzheimer’s, traumatic brain injury), cardiovascular (heart attack, chronic heart disease), related clinical research, and advanced imaging research. For more information, please visit www.hmri.org. To learn more about how you can help support groundbreaking medical research at HMRI, contact Susie Berry, VP of Development at (626) 389-3407 or susie.berry@hmri.org. About the W. M. Keck Foundation Based in Los Angeles, the W. M. Keck Foundation was established in 1954 by the late W. M. Keck, founder of the Superior Oil Company. The Foundation’s grant making is focused primarily on pioneering efforts in the areas of medical research, science and engineering and undergraduate education. The Foundation also maintains a Southern California Grant Program that provides support for the Los Angeles community, with a special emphasis on children and youth. For more information, please visit www.wmkeck.org.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Robert Kloner mentioned in Shape article about the most common causes of high blood pressure
Post Date: January 13, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: blood
HMRI’s Chief Science Officer and Scientific Director of Cardiovascular Research, Dr. Robert A. Kloner, explains the most common causes of high blood pressure. Title: The Most Common Causes High Blood Pressure, Explained By: Shape Author: K. Aleisha Fetters Date: January 13, 2020 Link: https://www.shape.com/lifestyle/mind-and-body/what-causes-high-blood-pressure
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Robert Kloner mentioned in Star Tribune article - Is wine good for you?
Post Date: January 3, 2020   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News
HMRI’s Chief Science Officer and Scientific Director of Cardiovascular Research, Dr. Robert A. Kloner, talks about heart health and if it's good for you to drink wine. Title: Is wine good for you? Should you try dry January? Answers to your wine questions By: Star Tribune Author: Bill Ward Date: January 3, 2020 Link: http://www.startribune.com/is-wine-good-for-you-and-other-pressing-questions/566605311/

2019

Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Robert Kloner radio interview on Radio Health Journal: Christmas in the E.R. It’s no Holiday
Post Date: December 22, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News
HMRI’s Dr. Robert A. Kloner was recently interviewed by Radio Health Journal about the increase in cardiovascular-related deaths during the holiday season. Interview Link: https://radiohealthjournal.org/2019/12/22/19-51-segment-1-christmas-in-the-e-r-its-no-holiday/
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Michael Harrington co-published an article on Alzheimer's disease in PLOS ONE
Post Date: December 18, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: ad
Title: Pupillometry evaluation of melanopsin retinal ganglion cell function and sleep-wake activity in pre-symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease Date: December 10, 2019 Link: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0226197 In collaboration with Doheny Eye Institute, UCLA, and Italian colleagues, HMRI's Neurosciences department under Dr. Michael Harrington studied the functions of specialized cells (mRGC) in the retina. Cognitively healthy Brain Aging study participants with spinal fluid chemistry that predicts higher risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) had pupil responses, sleep, and circadian rhythms that were different from those at lower risk with good chemistry. These data suggest that mRGC cells reflect AD pathology before symptoms have started, and may help identify early AD.    
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner mentioned in American Heart Association News article about the risk of heart attacks during the winter
Post Date: December 11, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: cold
HMRI's Chief Science Officer and Scientific Director of Cardiovascular Research, Dr. Robert A. Kloner, talks about the winter cold and other seasonal factors that raise the risk of heart attacks and more. Title: Cold heart facts: Why you need to watch out in winter By: American Heart Association News Date: December 11, 2019 Link: https://www.heart.org/en/news/2019/12/11/cold-heart-facts-why-you-need-to-watch-out-in-winter
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI's Cardiovascular Team published an article in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Post Date: December 11, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: conditioning
Title: Remote Ischemic Conditioning in Acute Myocardial Infarction and Shock States Date: December 11, 2019 Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1074248419892603 This paper reviews recent studies that have looked at attempts to improve outcome from a heart attack using a technique that inflates a blood pressure cuff on the arm for a few minutes and then deflates it (called remote ischemic conditioning). While a recently clinical trial was negative, the authors studied low risk patients. A better application of this therapy may be a more challenging condition of shock. We discuss HMRI's work and the work of others to look at this therapy to treat various forms of shock.  
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI's Thao Tran invited to teach at the Advanced MRS Workshop in China
Post Date: December 2, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: china

Thao Tran, HMRI Director of Imaging HMRI's Thao Tran, MSc, RT (MR), MRSO (ABMRS), was invited to teach a course at the Advanced MRS Workshop which took place November 22-24 at Wuhan Union Hospital in Wuhan, China, with 40 radiologists, MR scientists and technologists from Iran, Taiwan and all over China. Along with three GE Senior MR Scientists and former HMRI colleague, Alex Lin, the workshop covered proton and multi-nuclear MR Spectroscopy topics and included hands-on practical sessions. The workshop was a great success and HMRI has been invited back for 2020.

Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Michael Harrington co-published an article on Alzheimer's disease in the Journal of Neuroscience
Post Date: November 27, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: brain
Title: ApoE4 Alters ABCA1 Membrane Trafficking in Astrocytes Date: November 27, 2019 Link: https://www.jneurosci.org/content/39/48/9611 Recent publications have reported that frequent use of gadolinium, widely employed to examine brain blood barrier leakage, can get deposited in the brain, raising the question that it may adversely affect the brain. We found that 52 HMRI and USC older research participants had no evidence of retained gadolinium 19-28 months after receiving the agent, in spite of having leaky capillaries. This is reassuring for further use of this technique to investigate the important brain capillary leaks that arise in early Alzheimer's disease.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI's Cardiovascular Research Team presented at the American Heart Association meetings in Philadelphia
Post Date: November 20, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: abstracts

Congratulations to HMRI’s Cardiovascular Research Team who presented four abstracts at the Resuscitation Science section of the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions meeting and two abstracts at the Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association in Philadelphia this month. One of the abstracts is especially relevant as it is a true heart-brain connection study, showing that some of HMRI’s therapies for hemorrhagic shock also protected against strokes. Another abstract focused on vaping and the myocardial infarct size. Congratulations to Drs. Robert Kloner, Jianru Shi , Wangde Dai, and Juan Carreno.

Posted 1 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Robert Kloner co-published an article in Cardiovascular Research, the international journal of the European Society of Cardiology
Post Date: November 9, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: blood
Title: Pathophysiology and diagnosis of coronary microvascular dysfunction in ST-elevation myocardial infarction Date: November 9, 2019 Link: https://academic.oup.com/cardiovascres/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/cvr/cvz301/5618723 This paper describes the problem of abnormal blood flow through the small blood vessels of the heart that can occur after opening up the large occluded coronary artery associated with a heart attack. It discusses how to diagnose the problem, the consequences of the problem and potential solutions and therapies.
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner Interviewed by Bill Handel on KFI-AM About Long Term Effects of Vaping
Post Date: November 7, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: bill
HMRI’s Dr. Robert A. Kloner was recently interviewed by Bill Handel on the Bill Handel Show on KFI-AM about the long term effects of vaping. Interview Link: https://kfiam640.iheart.com/featured/bill-handel/content/2019-11-07-dr-robert-kloner-on-the-long-term-health-effects-of-vaping/  
Posted 1 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Xianghong Arakaki elected to serve as a Steering Committee Member of the Electrophysiology PIA Executive Committee of the Alzheimer’s Association ISTAART
Post Date: October 25, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: alzheimer's

In October 2019, HMRI's Dr. Xianghong Arakaki was elected for a two-year term to serve as a Steering Committee Member of the Electrophysiology PIA Executive Committee of the Alzheimer’s Association International Society to Advance Alzheimer’s Research and Treatment (ISTAART). The Executive Committee’s role is to oversee PIA operations, provide and share input on trends within the field, coordinate the scientific and educational activities, and represent the PIA to the ISTAART Advisory Council.

Posted 2 years ago
HMRI Participates in Innovate Pasadena's Connect Week 2019
Post Date: October 18, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: ai

As part of Innovate Pasadena's Connect Week 2019, HMRI hosted an open house on October 17th for the local community to visit and learn about our various research programs. HMRI is Pasadena's only biomedical research institute. To learn more about the Innovate Pasadena, visit their website: https://www.innovatepasadena.org/. HMRI's Ke Wei, Imaging Research Programmer Analyst, was invited to facilitate the inaugural AI LA Life Summit at Caltech. This event was also part of the Connect Week series of events held throughout Pasadena. Ke led a discussion with a group of entrepreneurs to brainstorm potential AI applications in healthcare and in bio-medicine. 

Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Cardiovascular Research Team will be presenting 6 abstracts for the American Heart Association meetings in November
Post Date: September 19, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: abstracts
Congratulations to HMRI's Cardiovascular Research Team who will be presenting four abstracts at the Resuscitation Science section of the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions meeting and two abstracts at the Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association in Philadelphia in November. One of the abstracts is especially relevant as it is a true heart-brain connection study, showing that some of HMRI's therapies for hemorrhagic shock also protected against strokes. Congratulations to Drs. Robert Kloner, Jianru Shi , Wangde Dai, and Juan Carreno. To learn more about the Symposium, visit https://professional.heart.org/professional/EducationMeetings/MeetingsLiveCME/ReSS/UCM_321311_Resuscitation-Science-Symposium.jsp.
Posted 2 years ago
New editorial commentary by HMRI' Dr. Kloner on the continuing concerns about the cardiovascular safety of marijuana in Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine Journal
Post Date: September 18, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: comments
Title: Editorial commentary: Continuing concerns about the cardiovascular safety of marijuana Date: September 3, 2019 Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1050173819301264?via%3Dihub This editorial comments on a study that pulled together 62 cases of people having heart attacks shortly after using marijuana. The victims were typically young men who used the drug a few hours before the heart attack. Dr. Kloner comments on the increased hospitalizations and emergency ward visits occurring in states where marijuana has been legalized and the association between these visits and heart problems. Health care workers and users of marijuana need to be made aware of the potential risks marijuana has on the heart.
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Kloner mentioned in allnurses article titled "CBD Oil for Older Adults, What is Known and Unknown"
Post Date: August 26, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News
Title: CBD Oil for Older Adults, What is Known and Unknown Date: August 22, 2019 Author: J.Adderton, BSN, MSN Link: https://allnurses.com/cbd-oil-older-adults-what-t705545/.XWRc7LoYfkk
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Kloner published a paper in the Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy Journal titled “Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management of the No-Reflow Phenomenon”
Post Date: August 20, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: coronary
Title: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management of the No-Reflow Phenomenon Date: August 15, 2019 Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10557-019-06901-0 No-reflow is the problem that even after opening up a large occluded coronary artery in the setting of a heart attack, by placing a stent or using a clot busting drug, the small coronary arteries in the wall of the heart may remain blocked. This is called no-reflow and is a bad prognosticator, associated with death and heart failure. In this paper we provide information on how to diagnose and treat this devastating consequence of heart attacks.
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI Hosted a Reception to Celebrate Class of 2019 Summer Student Volunteer Program
Post Date: August 19, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: brain membranes for alzheimer's
On Friday, August 16th, Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) held a reception to celebrate the accomplishments of the Class of 2019 Student Interns. Students were awarded certificates of completion after they presented their scientific posters in front of their family members and friends and HMRI staff, board and community members. To view pictures from the event, click here. During the 10-week summer program, HMRI provided undergraduate students an educational, hands-on experience that gave them insight regarding how a research laboratory or program runs. Students were given safety training before being assigned a specific project by one of HMRI’s research investigators. Every week students were exposed to scientific lectures on a variety of topics by HMRI scientists and guests. [video width="1920" height="1080" mp4="https://hmri.org/dev/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/2019_Summer_Students_1080p.mp4"][/video] Class of 2019 Students:
  • Mahsa Asgari (Pasadena City College, Transferring to University of California, Los Angeles)
    • Project: Earlier Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnosis
  • Oscar Chan (Pasadena City College, Transferring to University of California, Berkeley)
    • Project: Relationship Between Respiratory Data Factors and BOLD (Blood Oxygen-Level Dependent) Signals in MRI
  • Leslie Escobar (Pasadena City College)
    • Project: Cognitive and Motor Decline in Early Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Marah Hasan (Pasadena City College, Transferring to University of California, San Diego)
    • Project: Earlier Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnosis
  • Josée Horton (Pasadena City College, Transferring to University of California, Davis)
    • Project: Purifying Human Brain Membranes for Alzheimer’s Studies
  • Erick Huang (Baylor University)
    • Project: Exploring Task Shifting in Cognitively Healthy Elderly Individuals
  • Nicole Lin (Emory University)
    • Project: Effects of Nicotine and Myocardial Infarct Size and No-Reflow Phenomenon in a Rat Coronary Artery Occlusion/Reperfusion Model
  • Ella Prebel Jackert (John Hopkins University)
    • Project: Identifying Protein Biomarkers in Migraine
  • Austin Sophonsri (Pasadena City College, Transferring to University of California, San Diego)
    • Project: Fourier Analysis on Raw End-Tidal o2 and CO2 Data
  • Claire Wong (University of Washington, Seattle)
    • Project: Purifying Human Brain Membranes for Alzheimer’s Studies
  • Jessica Wong (University of Southern California)
    • Project: Indicators of Early Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) in Human Urine
  To learn more about the program and application requirements, visit https://hmri.org/education.
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner, Dr. Wangde Dai, and Sharon Hale published an article in Regenerative Medicine
Post Date: July 18, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: auxiliary
Title: Potential for stem cell-derived biologic pumps for cardiovascular and other medical therapies Date: July 17, 2019 Link: https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/rme-2019-0056 When the heart is injured, there may be a need to improve blood flow by developing ventricular assist devices that help move blood forward.  This paper reviews our previous experience with utilizing immature heart cells implanted not into the heart but into blood vessel walls, such as the aorta or vena cava, to provide auxiliary pumps for blood flow to the organs of the body. We previously showed that immature heart cells could survive, differentiate, grow and contract when implanted as cuffs around large blood vessels; in essence, creating little hearts to help blood move through the arterial and venous system independent of the pumping ability of the main heart. Induced pluripotent stem cells could be used to develop these auxiliary pumps.  
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Kloner published a paper in the American Heart Journal titled "Lessons learned about stress and the heart after major earthquakes"
Post Date: July 5, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: brain
Title: Lessons learned about stress and the heart after major earthquakes Date: July 5, 2019 Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0002870319301437 This paper is a follow up to Dr. Robert Kloner's previous work on the effect of the Northridge earthquake as a trigger of cardiovascular events. This new paper published in the American Heart Journal this week reviews thirteen major earthquakes world-wide and describes the types of cardiac events that have been associated with the emotional stress of an earthquake. There is no question that the stress of an earthquake can contribute to sudden death, heart attacks, heart failure, and high blood pressure. Our analysis helps to show the way in which perception of an event by the brain can affect the heart (the brain heart connection).  
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Michael Harrington co-authored a paper published in the Journal of the European Society of Radiology
Post Date: July 2, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: brain
Title: Cerebral sodium (23Na) magnetic resonance imaging in patients with migraine — a case-control study Date: July 1, 2019 Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00330-019-06299-1 This report uses MRI to demonstrate that sodium levels in brain fluids are higher in migraine. These results support the initial discovery by HMRI that brain sodium regulation is altered in migraine, and offers a method to guide the many different migraine treatments.
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Kloner publishes editorial in the July/August 2019 issue of Cardiology in Review
Post Date: July 1, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: brain
Title: The Brain–Heart Connection and the Northridge Earthquake Date: July 1, 2019 Link: https://journals.lww.com/cardiologyinreview/Citation/2019/07000/The_Brain_Heart_Connection_and_the_Northridge.1.aspx The editorial stresses the connection between the heart and brain. Emotional stress, experienced by the brain resulted in heart attacks at the time of the Northridge earthquake in 1994.
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner co-published an article on coronary artery disease
Post Date: June 17, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: artery
Title: Coronary artery calcium testing: A call for universal coverage Date: May 2, 2019 Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211335519300592?via%3Dihub This paper represents an important opinion regarding screening patients for coronary artery disease in the state of California and is written by a number of experts in the field.
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Imaging Team co-published an article in the American Journal of Neuroradiology
Post Date: June 13, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: brain
Title: Subject-Specific Studies of CSF Bulk Flow Patterns in the Spinal Canal: Implications for the Dispersion of Solute Particles in Intrathecal Drug Delivery Date: June 13, 2019 Link: http://www.ajnr.org/content/early/2019/06/13/ajnr.A6097 The article, co-written by HMRI’s Dr. Kevin King and Kei Wei, provides important insights into the circulation of fluid around the brain and the spine.  Very little is known about how this fluid moves around, and this is critically important in understanding how medicines injected into the spinal canal to control pain or treat cancer will impact the brain and the spine.
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Neurosciences Research Team co-publishes article on migraine in PLOS ONE
Post Date: June 7, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: cause
Title: Endogenous Na+, K+-ATPase inhibitors and CSF [Na+] contribute to migraine formation Date: June 7, 2019 Link: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0218041 The cause of the common disorder of migraine is not known. In this paper, HMRI presents evidence that the brain organs called choroid plexuses, by increasing sodium in the spinal fluid, are responsible. This may guide future treatments to correct this underlying cause of migraine.
Posted 2 years ago
Media Release: HMRI Hosts Inaugural Community Forum to Release Findings from Study on Aging with HIV
Post Date: June 5, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: 5 2019
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 5, 2019  

MEDIA RELEASE: HMRI HOSTS INAUGURAL COMMUNITY FORUM TO RELEASE FINDINGS FROM STUDY ON AGING WITH HIV

Four-Time Gold Medal Olympic Diver, Greg Louganis, to deliver keynote speech

  On Saturday, June 8, 2019, Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) will host an Inaugural Community Forum to highlight the findings from its BRAVE (Brain Aging and Vascular Etiology in HIV) study. The focus of the study is to gain a better understanding of brain and cardiovascular changes among people who are HIV positive but continue to maintain viral suppression. The study also seeks to better understand accelerated aging and increased risk for non-AIDS age-related diseases such as heart disease, liver disease, and neurocognitive decline. Infectious Disease Specialist, Dr. Kimberly Shriner of Huntington Hospital and HMRI’s Director of Imaging Research, Dr. Kevin S. King, will speak about the physician’s view on managing HIV and about the importance of the study. Moderated by Dr. Shriner, the Forum also includes a panel of five individuals living healthy lives with HIV. HMRI began the BRAVE study in 2017 to follow people living with HIV over time to better understand their heart and brain health while living otherwise healthy lives with HIV. Since the start of the study, HMRI has enrolled approximately 50 individuals and plans to continue enrolling study participants. Studying brain health with aging in HIV is difficult as many of the changes seen in the brain in HIV resemble accelerated aging.  HMRI has used a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging evaluation that allows research scientists to distinguish the effects of HIV on the brain from the effects of aging.  It’s also been found that people with more advanced HIV infection when they initiate treatment have persistent deficiencies in brain metabolism and brain artery function even after achieving long term viral suppression.  Importantly, scientists can identify metabolic and vascular problems before any permanent damage to the brain has occurred and when health interventions have the best chance of improving long term outcomes. HMRI President and CEO, Dr. Julia Bradsher shares, “We are excited to launch this new program to engage and educate the community about our research and life-changing health conditions and diseases.” Dr. Bradsher went on to say, “We plan to make this an annual program and focus each year on a different area of HMRI’s work. We are pleased to feature the BRAVE study in this inaugural program.” Greg Louganis, four-time Gold Medal Olympic diver, speaker, author, activist, actor, humanitarian, and designer, will be the keynote speaker. The Community Forum is a free event and is open to the public. Individuals interested in attending must RSVP online at https://hmri.org/brave/. Seating is limited. Deadline to RSVP is June 5, 2019. The event is sponsored by Perkins+Will and Gilead Sciences, Inc. For interviews, please contact Brenda Rivas at Brenda.Rivas@hmri.org or 626-807-7079.

###

Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI), founded in 1952, is an independent, non-profit organization with the mission to improve lives through patient-focused scientific research.  HMRI conducts internationally recognized research in the areas of neuroscience (migraine, Alzheimer’s, traumatic brain injury), cardiovascular (heart attack, chronic heart disease), clinical research (hepatitis, liver cancer, colorectal cancer, and pelvic floor disorders) and advanced imaging research.  For more information, please visit www.hmri.org
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Harrington co-published a paper in The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Post Date: May 31, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: abstainers
Title: Nonconformist tendencies related to risky choices in female methamphetamine abstainers Published: May 31, 2019 Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00952990.2019.1608554?journalCode=iada20 It is widely held that drug addiction is influenced by social influences, but the effect of social factors on safe or risky choices of abstaining addicts have been little studied. We found female methamphetamine users made more risky choices and demonstrated more nonconforming attitudes in a gambling task when exposed to the choices of their peers. This nonconformist tendency may help track and understand the addiction and decisions made by female methamphetamine abstainers.
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI in the News: AHA - Drinking Red Wine for Heart Health? Read This Before You Toast
Post Date: May 24, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: alcohol
Source: American Heart Association News Date Published: 5/24/2019 Title: Drinking red wine for heart health? Read this before you toast Link: https://www.heart.org/en/news/2019/05/24/drinking-red-wine-for-heart-health-read-this-before-you-toast HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner warns that drinking red wine doesn't necessarily lead to better heart health. "Alcohol in excess is really bad for the heart," Kloner said. "It can cause high blood pressure and promote arrhythmias. It can cause cardiomyopathy where the alcohol is actually toxic to the heart muscle cells, and that can lead to heart failure."
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI Dr. Kevin King and Thao Tran were invited to annual SMRT/ISMRM conference in Montreal
Post Date: May 21, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: 12

HMRI's Dr. Kevin King was invited by the Society of MR Radiographers & Technologists (SMRT) to speak at their annual meeting on Saturday, May 12 in Montreal about “Brain Microvascular Injury on MRI” in the “Neuro” session. HMRI's Senior MR Specialist, Thao Tran, moderated the session. Dr. King was also invited by the International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) to speak at their annual meeting in Montreal on May 12 about “Cardiovascular Response” in the “Physiology & Hemodynamics” session. 

Posted 2 years ago
Media Advisory for June 8: HMRI Hosts Inaugural Community Forum on Living Well with HIV
Post Date: May 21, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: aging and vascular etiology

MEDIA ADVISORY FOR:  June 8, 2019  

ADVISORY: SATURDAY, JUNE 8: HMRI HOSTS INAUGURAL COMMUNITY FORUM ON LIVING WELL WITH HIV WITH KEYNOTE SPEAKER, GREG LOUGANIS

Community Forum will Highlight Findings from HMRI’S Study on Brain Aging and Vascular Etiology in HIV 

  Pasadena, CA – Hosted by Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) on Saturday, June 8th, the Inaugural Community Forum will highlight the findings from HMRI’s BRAVE (Brain Aging and Vascular Etiology in HIV) study. The focus of the study is to gain a better understanding of brain and cardiovascular changes among people who are HIV positive but continue to maintain viral suppression. The study also seeks to better understand accelerated aging and increased risk for non-AIDS age-related diseases such as heart disease, liver disease, and neurocognitive decline. HMRI began a study in 2017 to follow people living with HIV over time to better understand their heart and brain health while living otherwise healthy lives with HIV. Since the start of the study, HMRI has enrolled approximately 50 individuals and plans to continue enrolling study participants. Greg Louganis, four-time Gold Medal Olympic Diver, will be the keynote speaker. Event Details: WHAT: Community Forum will highlight findings from HMRI’S HIV study and will feature panel of five people living healthy lives with HIV. WHO: Dr. Kimberly Shriner, MD, Infectious Disease Specialist, Huntington Hospital Dr. Kevin S. King MD, Director of Imaging Research, Huntington Medical Research Institutes Greg Louganis, Four-time Gold Medal Olympic Diver, Speaker, Author, Activist, Actor, Humanitarian, and Designer - Community Forum Keynote Speaker WHERE: Huntington Medical Research Institutes - Engemann Family Auditorium 686 South Fair Oaks Ave., Pasadena, CA 91105 WHEN: Saturday, June 8, 2019, 9:30 am – 1:30 pm GENERAL PUBLIC RSVP: The Community Forum is a free event and is open to the public. RSVP online at https://hmri.org/brave/. Seating is limited. Deadline to RSVP is June 3, 2019. MEDIA RSVP: For press credentials and/or interviews, please contact Brenda Rivas at Brenda.Rivas@hmri.org or 626-807-7079. The event is sponsored by Perkins+Will and Gilead Sciences, Inc. 

###

Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI), founded in 1952, is a nonprofit biomedical research organization with the mission to improve lives through patient-focused scientific research.  HMRI conducts internationally recognized research in the areas of neuroscience (migraine, Alzheimer’s, traumatic brain injury), cardiovascular (heart attack, chronic heart disease), clinical research (hepatitis, liver cancer, colorectal cancer, and pelvic floor disorders) and advanced imaging research.  For more information, please visit www.hmri.org. 

Posted 2 years ago
HMRI Cardiovascular Research Team published a paper in Life Sciences journal
Post Date: April 22, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: applied
Title: Myocardial hypothermia induced after reperfusion does not prevent adverse left ventricular remodeling nor improve cardiac function. Published: April 13, 2019 Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30991060 The importance of this study is that it shows that hypothermia (cold) applied to the heart in the setting of heart attack results in a smaller heart attack and better healing of the heart attack and preservation of the left ventricles' shape and function if applied early, while the coronary artery is still occluded. However, if the cold is applied after the coronary artery is already opened (by stenting or angioplasty) then cold is not protective.    
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Robert Kloner co-authored a paper in The American Journal of Cardiology
Post Date: April 12, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: events
Title: Acute and Subacute Triggers of Cardiovascular Events Published: December 15, 2018 Link: https://hmri.org/dev/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Acute-and-Subacute-Triggers.pdf The paper reviews the kinds of triggers that may precipitate major adverse heart events, such as heart attack and sudden death. It deals with the kinds of life stressors that people should be aware of that may contribute to the triggering of heart disease.
Posted 2 years ago
Media Release: HMRI Welcomes New Board Member
Post Date: April 11, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: art
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 11, 2019 

HMRI WELCOMES NEW BOARD MEMBER Terry Perucca Joins HMRI Board of Directors

  Pasadena, CA – Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) is pleased to announce the election of Terry Perucca to its Board of Directors. Prior to retiring, Perucca was the President of Banc of America Equity Partners (BAEP) headquartered in Chicago, IL. “HMRI is so fortunate to have someone with Terry’s forty plus years of experience in the financial services industry. We will greatly benefit from Terry’s breadth and depth of experience as a business leader and as an experienced board member in the philanthropic community,” said Dr. Julia Bradsher, President and CEO of Huntington Medical Research Institutes. “Since returning to Pasadena to deal with my wife's Alzheimer's I have become familiar with the outstanding work done at HMRI. I am excited to join the Board and to be able to support their excellent research efforts to learn more about these diseases that have impacted so many families," said Terry Perucca. BAEP was formed in 1996 when Perucca was asked to relocate to Chicago and grow a private equity business where the Bank of America would be the primary limited partner.  This move followed the consolidation of Continental Bank, Illinois into the Bank of America. While in Chicago, Perucca was a Trustee at the Museum of Contemporary Art where he chaired the Finance Committee and was a member of the Executive Committee and was also involved with the Art Institute of Chicago where he sat on the Committee for African Art and Indian Art of the America’s. Perucca began his career at Security Pacific as an Industrial Engineer where he was instrumental in developing and installing the first ATM machines in the mid-1970s. Born and raised in Burbank, CA, Perucca attended Arizona State University where he earned a B.S. in Business Management. After graduation, he assumed his position with Security Pacific Bank. Most recently, Perucca joined the Patron Program at the Getty Museum and is a Fellow at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Gardens, and also serves on the Arts Collection Committee and the Arts Collections Council.   For interviews, please contact Brenda Rivas at Brenda.Rivas@hmri.org or 626-807-7079.

###

Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI), founded in 1952, is an independent, non-profit organization with the mission to improve lives through patient-focused scientific research.  HMRI conducts internationally recognized research in the areas of neuroscience (migraine, Alzheimer’s, traumatic brain injury), cardiovascular (heart attack, chronic heart disease), clinical research (hepatitis, liver cancer, colorectal cancer, and pelvic floor disorders) and advanced imaging research.  For more information, please visit www.hmri.org
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI’s Dr. Michael Harrington co-authored a pilot study of fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy in preclinical Alzheimer’s disease
Post Date: April 8, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News
Title: A pilot study of fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy in preclinical Alzheimer’s disease Published: March 28, 2019 Link: https://hmri.org/dev/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Sadda-AD-FLIO-2019.pdf
New imaging studies of the retina show promise to diagnose early Alzheimer pathology before symptoms start. The value is to help identify individuals for new treatments and to monitor if a new treatment is working.
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI Intern Presents at the 2019 Honors Transfer Council of California Student Research Conference
Post Date: April 6, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: california

On April 6, 2019, Edward Chau, current Pasadena City College student and HMRI intern at our Imaging Center, gave a presentation at the Honors Transfer Council of California Student Research Conference at the University of California, Irvine about using deep learning for medical diagnoses. Edward is working with HMRI research assistant Ke Wei to develop an automated tool to identify brain white matter damage.

Posted 2 years ago
HMRI Board Member to Receive Margaret L. Kripke Legend Award for Promotion of Women in Cancer Medicine & Cancer Science
Post Date: March 22, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: anderson
HMRI Board Member Dr. Alexandra Levine will be honored on March 27, 2019, by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center with the Margaret L. Kripke Legend Award for Promotion of Women in Cancer Medicine & Cancer Science. Established in 2008, the Kripke Award recognizes a person who has made significant contributions in advancing and promoting women in cancer medicine and cancer science. It honors Professor Emerita Margaret L. Kripke, Ph.D., for her advocacy for and promotion of women in academic medicine and science. Kripke, a distinguished scientist, achieved many firsts for women at MD Anderson Cancer Center, culminating in her promotion to executive vice president and chief academic officer.

Congratulations, Dr. Levine!

For additional information about the award, visit the MD Anderson Cancer Center website.
Posted 2 years ago
Media Release: HMRI Expands Development and Human Resources Departments
Post Date: March 21, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: development
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  March 21, 2019 

HMRI EXPANDS DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENTS 

Pasadena, CA – Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) announces new staff in the areas of Development and Human Resources, along with a promotion and new responsibilities for a key leader in the organization.    HMRI welcomes Danese Bardot as its new Director of Development. Bardot brings over ten years of successful hands-on experience in annual, leadership, major, and planned giving, including corporate and foundation fundraising, to HMRI’s Development Department. Bardot is a Certified Fundraising Executive (CFRE) and was nominated for Western Washington University’s 2014 President’s Exceptional Effort Award. Before joining HMRI, Bardot held several senior development positions at both academic and nonprofit organizations which include the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation, Georgia Southern University, Western Washington University, Elgin Academy in Elgin, IL, and Pacific Hills School in West Hollywood, CA. Bardot holds a B.A. in Management from the University of Redlands, and a J.D. from Syracuse University College of Law.   Also joining HMRI is Brenda Rivas, who was hired to serve as the Human Resource Specialist and Compliance Coordinator and also oversees communications at HMRI. Rivas has over eight years of experience as a human resource professional and over ten years working in a nonprofit setting. Prior to HMRI, Rivas created and formalized the department of human resources at the National Hispanic Media Coalition, where she oversaw operations and communications, and led corporate fundraising outreach.   Rivas has a Certificate in Human Resources Management from UCLA Extension and a B.A. in Cinematic Arts, with an emphasis in Critical Studies and a minor in Spanish, from the University of Southern California.   Susie Berry was promoted to her current role as Vice President of Operations and Development Officer overseeing HMRI’s development, facilities, and human resource departments in February 2019. Berry was first hired as the Director of Development in 2016 and became the Vice President of Operations in September 2018.  Since joining HMRI, Berry helped lead the capital campaign for HMRI’s new $30 million, 35,000-square-foot world-class research facility in Pasadena. Completed in April 2018, HMRI’s new building is part of the biomedical corridor on Fair Oaks Avenue.  “We are thrilled that Susie is leading our operations and development teams here at HMRI.  She brings solid leadership experience to our Senior Staff,” said Dr. Julia Bradsher, President and CEO of Huntington Medical Research Institutes. “Danese rounds out our Development Team with a wide array of development experience especially in major gifts and we couldn’t be more pleased to welcome her to HMRI.” Dr. Bradsher went on to say, As we grow and develop as an organization, we are also building our infrastructure to support that growth.  Brenda brings sound human resources and communications experience that will help us in creating new ways to engage with staff and new ways to engage with our community.      For interviews, please contact Brenda Rivas at Brenda.Rivas@hmri.org or 626-807-7079.  

###

Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI), founded in 1952, is an independent, non-profit organization with the mission to improve lives through patient-focused scientific research.  HMRI conducts internationally recognized research in the areas of neuroscience (migraine, Alzheimer’s, traumatic brain injury), cardiovascular (heart attack, chronic heart disease), clinical research (hepatitis, liver cancer, colorectal cancer, and pelvic floor disorders) and advanced imaging research.  For more information, please visit www.hmri.org  
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Michael Harrington to speak at the San Marino City Club on March 19th
Post Date: March 14, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: city
HMRI's Dr. Michael Harrington has been selected as the featured speaker for the San Marino City Club's March 19, 2019 meeting. Dr. Harrington will speak on the topic of "Research on Dementias, Including Alzheimer's Disease." His talk will include definitions, the scale of the problem, what we can do now, what is known, what is needed, and what researchers are doing at HMRI. For more information on this event, please visit the City Club's website at www.sanmarinocityclub.org.  
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI’s Thao Tran was invited by SMRT to serve on Global Relations and Program Committees
Post Date: March 13, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: 2019
The Society for MR Radiographers & Technologists (SMRT) is an international society and global community of MR technologists that meets annually. It’s a nonprofit organization for techs to share expertise and educational resources and promotes education, communication, and dissemination of cutting-edge MR developments. Earlier this month, HMRI’s Thao Tran was invited by SMRT to serve as Chair of the Global Relations Committee and Vice Chair the of Program Committee for a one-year term beginning in May 2019. The Global Relations Committee is responsible for liaising with governments at all levels and other professional and ethical societies, industry and with the public at large. The Program Committee is responsible for the organization of the teaching and scientific program at the Annual Meeting of the SMRT. In February 2019, Thao was elected to SMRT's Policy Board for a three-year term. Thao has been involved in SMRT for about nine years and was a volunteer Abstract Reviewer for the previous two years. As a reviewer, she read through research abstracts and scored them in order to choose the ones that will be presented at the SMRT meeting.

Congratulations, Thao!

Posted 2 years ago
HMRI Proud Supporter of the Altadena Guild's 2019 Marvelous Midwick Drive Home Tour
Post Date: March 12, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: Uncategorized

Posted 2 years ago
Professor Mihi Yang of the Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women’s University, visits HMRI
Post Date: March 11, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News
Professor Mihi Yang of the Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul, South Korea, was a visiting scientist at HMRI from March 4-8, 2019. Professor Yang works with the Korean Center for Disease Control on oxidative stress markers of diseases and is interested in learning lipid analyses from HMRI’s scientists, after reading of Dr. Alfred Fonteh’s work from his publications. She was accompanied by her graduate student, Eunbee Kim, who expects to pursue doctoral studies in the United States. At HMRI, both researchers learned about sample preparation techniques such as extraction of lipids from fluids, hydrolysis, derivatization, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. It is expected that preliminary data obtained from this collaboration will lead to funding opportunities from several lending institutions.
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Alfred Fonteh presents at the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology DEUEL Conference
Post Date: March 11, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: abstract
HMRI's Dr. Alfred Fonteh attended the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology DEUEL Conference on Lipids at Dana Point, CA, from March 5-8, 2019. Dr. Fonteh presented three abstracts on the ongoing collaboration between the Neuroscience Program and Dr. Robert Cowan of Stanford University on chronic migraine research. The first abstract showed an increased breakdown of lipids in plasma obtained from patients with chronic migraine compared with control study participants. The second abstract showed that medications used to treat inflammation or pain reduced the breakdown of lipids in plasma from chronic migraine patients. The third abstract showed that conditions such as depression or obesity that are common in migraine patients were also related to the differences in plasma lipid profiles. Together, these studies show that chronic migraine patients have abnormal lipid metabolism that can be exploited by physician/scientists to monitor migraine severity, response to current medications, or to discover better treatments.  
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI is now accepting applications for the 2019 Student Summer Program
Post Date: February 15, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News

Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Thao T. Tran, MSc, MRSO, elected to SMRT Policy Board
Post Date: February 14, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: abstract
The Society for MR Radiographers & Technologists (SMRT) is an international society and global community of MR technologists that meets annually. It’s a nonprofit organization for techs to share expertise and educational resources and promotes education, communication, and dissemination of cutting-edge MR developments. This year, HMRI's Thao Tran was elected to be a Policy Board Member for a three-year term where she, along with the rest of the Board, will have the authority to establish and implement policies and programs for the SMRT. As a Board officer, Tran will also chair one of the following committees a year: Program Committee, Abstract Committee, Online Learning Committee, Safety Committee, Membership Committee, Marketing Committee, Global Relations Committee. Tran's term will officially start at this year’s meeting in May.
"I'm very excited and honored to be a part of this society as a policy board officer, and hope to make productive contributions over the next few years!" - Thao Tran
Tran has been involved in SMRT for about nine years and was a volunteer Abstract Reviewer for the previous two years. As a reviewer, she read through research abstracts and scored them in order to choose the ones that will be presented at the SMRT meeting. Congratulations, Thao!
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI published an article in Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy journal about a promising therapeutic strategy to improve long-term survival from hemorrhagic shock injury
Post Date: February 13, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: blood
Title: Improved Long-term Survival with Remote Limb Ischemic Preconditioning in a Rat Fixed-Pressure Hemorrhagic Shock Model Published: February 12, 2019 Link: https://hmri.org/dev/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/10.1007_s10557-019-06860-6.pdf The article published in the journal Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy was co-authored by HMRI's Drs. Wandge Dai, Jianru Shi, Juan Carreno, Robert Kloner, and Sharon Hale. This is a very important paper as it shows for the first time that remote ischemic conditioning (a procedure where one simply inflates and deflates a blood pressure cuff on the limb) can markedly improve long-term survival from hemorrhagic shock (shock due to blood loss). It is the first of HMRI's original papers from our U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) grant and could lead to novel therapies for wounded soldiers and civilians.
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner co-authored a paper in the Journal of Cardiovascular Translational Research
Post Date: February 12, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News
Title:  Beyond Reperfusion: Acute Ventricular Unloading and Cardioprotection During Myocardial Infarction Published: January 22, 2019 Link: https://hmri.org/dev/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Curran2019_Article_BeyondReperfusionAcuteVentricu.pdf The paper, co-authored by HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner, reviews recent studies that suggest that taking the workload off the heart in the early hours of a heart attack, using mechanical left ventricular assist devices, may actually preserve heart cells and preserve long term heart function. This is a novel concept that could make us rethink the current standard of care for heart attacks.
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Kevin King delivered a lecture at the Canadian Organization of Medical Physicists (COMP)
Post Date: February 11, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: clinical
Dr. Kevin King delivered a lecture entitled ‘Clinical Applications of MR Spectroscopy’ at the Canadian Organization of Medical Physicists annual winter meeting on February 8th, 2019 in Ottawa, Canada.  His lecture featured important cutting edge clinical MR Spectroscopy research being done at HMRI.  Topics discussed included how HMRI uses MR Spectroscopy in our research and clinical work to identify the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease prior to the onset of symptoms.  Another topic covered groundbreaking work at HMRI to study the brain impact of liver disease caused by obesity and diabetes, which is now the most common cause of cirrhosis.
Posted 2 years ago
Proceedings of the 3rd annual Acute Cardiac Unloading and REcovery (A-CURE) Symposium
Post Date: February 7, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: assist
Title: Proceedings of the 3rd annual Acute Cardiac Unloading and REcovery ( A- CURE) symposium Published: February 7, 2019 Link: https://bmccardiovascdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12872-019-1000-z The paper summarizes a number of studies performed in various research laboratories that focus on new devices that improve the function of the heart in settings such as heart attack. These studies were presented at the A-CURE meeting in November 2018 in Chicago, a satellite meeting just prior to the American Heart Association meetings.  Studies investigated mechanical devices that take the workload off of the heart and assist the heart in pumping blood to all of the organs of the body; when the heart has been injured. Dr. Robert Kloner's particular section is based on work that HMRI's research group ( Dr. Wangde Dai et al ) performed several years ago using living heart cells that had been transplanted into the walls of the great vessels (aorta and inferior vena cava) to serve as an auxiliary biologic pump to assist the heart.
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Michael Harrington participates in USC's Keck School of Medicine Department of Neurology Grand Rounds
Post Date: February 5, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News
On Tuesday, February 5th, 2019, HMRI's Dr. Michael Harrington was asked to participate in USC's Department of Neurology Grand Rounds as part of USC's Keck School of Medicine.  Dr. Harrington spoke in front of 100 medical students and neurology faculty members about the pathophysiology of migraines.  
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Michael Harrington co-authored a paper in The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association
Post Date: January 31, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News
Title: Vascular dysfunction—The disregarded partner of Alzheimer's disease Published: January 15, 2019 Link: https://www.alzheimersanddementia.com/article/S1552-5260(18)33495-2/fulltext
Posted 2 years ago
HMRI's Dr. Michael Harrington and David Buennagel co-authored a paper in the journal Nature Medicine about Alzheimer’s disease
Post Date: January 30, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News
Title: Blood–brain barrier breakdown is an early biomarker of human cognitive dysfunction Published: January 14, 2019 Link: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-018-0297-y Summary: https://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih-research-matters/blood-brain-barrier-test-may-predict-dementia 
Posted 2 years ago
Dr. Xianghong Arakaki, Dr. Michael Harrington, Dr. Alfred Fonteh, Dr. Kevin King, and Ryan Lee co-authored a paper about picking up signs of early Alzheimer's disease while wearing an EEG hat.
Post Date: January 17, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: brain

Title: Alpha desynchronization during simple working memory unmasks pathological aging in cognitively healthy individuals

Published: January 2, 2019

Link: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0208517

The brain is damaged more than ten years before any symptoms of Alzheimer’s appear. This is detected in spinal fluid chemistry, where brain stress shows up. We want to detect this pre-symptomatic stage, which would be important to test treatments before memories are lost. This study examined whether or not we could detect this early stage, having individuals wear an EEG hat while individuals performed simple computer tests. We found those who are cognitively healthy but have stressed chemistry in their spinal fluid had to use more of their brain EEG rhythms in the test compared to those with normal chemistry.

Posted 2 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner recently co-authored a paper in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics titled “Do We Need Potent Intravenous Antiplatelet Inhibition at the Time of Reperfusion During ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction?”
Post Date: January 10, 2019   Author: dstrickland   Category: paper
Dr. Robert Kloner recently co-authored a paper in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics titled “Do We Need Potent Intravenous Antiplatelet Inhibition at the Time of Reperfusion During ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction?” The paper can be read here.
Posted 2 years ago
A Thank You From the Editor-in-Chief, Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD
Post Date: January 1, 2019   Author: brivas   Category: Events & News
Title: A Thank You From the Editor-in-Chief, Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD Published: November 14, 2018 Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1074248418807813 HMRI's Dr. Robert Kloner signs off as editor in chief of the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, a role that he served for 10 years. "This paper really is a thank you note to all of the staff that contributed to the journal and highlights some of the successes of the journal over the years. It also introduces my successor and longtime collaborator,  Dr. Karin Przyklenk, to the readers." - Dr. Kloner

2018

Posted 2 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner co-authored a paper on the Cardiovascular effects of marijuana in the journal Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine.
Post Date: December 3, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: cardiovascular
Dr. Robert Kloner co-authored a paper on the Cardiovascular effects of marijuana in the journal Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine. This article discusses the potential cardiac side effects that marijuana may have. It has been associated with heart attack in a number of reports. The paper can be read here.
Posted 2 years ago
“Drs. Kloner, Dai, Shi and Niema Pahlevan, members of the cardiovascular research team, presented their posters at the American Heart Association Scientific Meetings in Chicago on November 11, 2018.”
Post Date: November 13, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: american

“Drs. Kloner, Dai, Shi and Niema Pahlevan, members of the cardiovascular research team, presented their posters at the American Heart Association Scientific Meetings in Chicago on November 11, 2018.”   

Posted 2 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner and members of the cardiovascular research team (Dr. Wangde Dai, Dr. Jianru Shi and Sharon Hale) will be presenting several papers at the prestigious American Heart Association annual scientific meetings in Chicago on November 11.
Post Date: November 8, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: american heart association
At the Resuscitation Science Sessions of the American Heart Association annual Scientific meetings in Chicago Dr. Kloner and team will be presenting the following papers:

1.)     Dai W, Shi J, Carreno J, Hale S, Kloner RA. Remote limb ischemic preconditioning improves short and long term survival and maintains intravascular blood volume during resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock.

2.)    Dai W, Shi J, Carreno J, Hale S, Kloner RA. Effects of anesthetic agents on the hemodynamic  stabilization and long term survival in an experimental model of hemorrhagic shock.

3.)    Shi J, Dai W, Carreno J, Hale S, Kloner RA. Effects of anesthetic agents on blood parameters in rats with acute hemorrhagic shock.

On Sunday, Nov 11th We will also be presenting the following paper at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions:

4.)    Pahlevan NM, Dai W, Kloner RA. Noninvasive and instantaneous diagnostics of acute myocardial infarction using intrinsic frequency method.

On Sunday, Nov 11th, Dr. Kloner will be giving an invited lecture at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions;

5.)    Testosterone therapy and CVD : Is it safe?

6.)    Dr. Kloner will also be lecturing at a satellite symposium at the AHA: on Friday Nov 9th he will give the following lecture at the annual ACURE meeting ( a meeting that focuses on left ventricular assist devices and heart failure) :  Kloner RA, Dai W. Survival, differentiation  and contractility of immature cardiac cells implanted into the outer walls of aorta and vena cavae of rats: A potential step in development of an auxiliary circulatory pump.

7.)    On Nov 11th Dr. Kloner, Dai and Shi will be discussants at a focused group meeting on the topic of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning with Endothelix Inc.

Posted 2 years ago
Karen Chu, Ke Wei, Thao Tran and Dr. Kevin King co-authored a paper titled “Distinguishing Brain Impact of Aging and HIV Severity in Chronic HIV Using Multiparametric MR Imaging and MR Spectroscopy” in Open Forum Infectious Diseases.
Post Date: October 29, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: hiv
Karen Chu, Ke Wei, Thao Tran and Dr. Kevin King co-authored a paper titled “Distinguishing Brain Impact of Aging and HIV Severity in Chronic HIV Using Multiparametric MR Imaging and MR Spectroscopy” in Open Forum Infectious Diseases. The paper can be read here.
Posted 3 years ago
HMRI will be participating as a Collaborator in Innovate Pasadena’s Connect Week festival for the first time!
Post Date: October 16, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: 25
HMRI will be participating as a Collaborator in Innovate Pasadena’s Connect Week festival for the first time! Dr. Robert Kloner and Dr. Michael Harrington will present a panel discussion entitled Beating Hearts and Thinking Brains: A Connection between Heart & Brain Disease on Thursday, October 25, from 4:00 – 5:00 pm in the Engemann Family Auditorium. Please click this link to the Connect Week website for more information about the HMRI program and all the 100+ Connect Week events throughout Pasadena from October 19 through October 28. https://connectpasadena.com/events You can register and RSVP for any of these events, including the HMRI program on October 25, on the Connect Week website.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Xianghong Arakaki, Dr. Noah Gross, Dr. Alfred Fonteh and Dr. Michael Harrington co-authored a chapter titled Animal Models in Chronic Daily Headache (CDH) and Pathophysiology of CDH in the book Chronic Headache.
Post Date: September 10, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: cdh
Dr. Xianghong Arakaki, Dr. Noah Gross, Dr. Alfred Fonteh and Dr. Michael Harrington co-authored a chapter titled Animal Models in Chronic Daily Headache (CDH) and Pathophysiology of CDH in the book Chronic Headache.
The abstract can be read here.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner was quoted in an article published September 7, 2018 by the American Heart Association News titled Are die-hard football, other sports fans putting their hearts at risk?
Post Date: September 7, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: article
Dr. Robert Kloner was quoted in an article published September 7, 2018 by the American Heart Association News titled Are die-hard football, other sports fans putting their hearts at risk? The article can be read here.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner co-authored a paper titled The pharmacist's role in improving the treatment of erectile dysfunction and its underlying causes.
Post Date: August 31, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: Publications

Dr. Robert Kloner co-authored a paper titled The pharmacist's role in improving the treatment of erectile dysfunction and its underlying causes.

The abstract can be read here.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner co-authored a paper titled Effect of Patiromer in Hyperkalemic Patients Taking and Not Taking RAAS Inhibitors in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics.
Post Date: August 31, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: paper
Dr. Robert Kloner co-authored a paper titled Effect of Patiromer in Hyperkalemic Patients Taking and Not Taking RAAS Inhibitors in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics. The paper can be viewed here.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner co-authored a paper titled The Case for Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy (Syndrome) as a Variant of Acute Myocardial Infarction in the journal Circulation
Post Date: August 31, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: paper
Dr. Robert Kloner co-authored a paper titled The Case for Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy(Syndrome) as a Variant of Acute Myocardial Infarction in the journal Circulation The paper can be viewed here.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Myron Tong co-authored three papers on the subjects of hepatitis and liver carcinoma in the journals Hepatology Communications, Hepatology and Journal of Digestive Diseases.
Post Date: August 22, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: hepatology
Dr. Myron Tong co-authored three papers on the subjects of hepatitis and liver carcinoma in the journals Hepatology Communications, Hepatology and Journal of Digestive Diseases. The papers can be read here.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Myron Tong and colleagues published a paper on the management of Hepatitis B Virus in Asian Americans titled An Expert Consensus for the management of chronic hepatitis B in Asian Americans.
Post Date: August 15, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: americans
Dr. Myron Tong lead author of a  paper on the management of Hepatitis B Virus in Asian Americans titled An Expert Consensus for the management of chronic hepatitis B in Asian Americans. The paper can be read here.
Posted 3 years ago
Pasadena Outlook - HMRI Announces Appointment of New CEO
Post Date: July 30, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: article
Julia Bradsher recently was named president and chief executive officer of Pasadena-based Huntington Medical Research Institutes. The rest of the article can be read here: Outlook Article - J.Bradsher 7.5.2018
Posted 3 years ago
The Altadena Guild Presents a Check for $67,000 to HMRI
Post Date: July 19, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: huntington
The Altadena Guild of Huntington Memorial Hospital, a local nonprofit, celebrated the conclusion of its year with the installation of the new Board and a presentation of a check to Huntington Medical Research Institutes. Read the press release here.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Michael Harrington is the co-author on a paper titled “Dynamic Sodium Imaging at Ultra-High Field Reveals Progression in a Preclinical Migraine Model” published in Pain, the Journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain.
Post Date: July 18, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: pain
Dr. Michael Harrington is the co-author on a paper titled “Dynamic Sodium Imaging at Ultra-High Field Reveals Progression in a Preclinical Migraine Model” published in Pain, the Journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain. The abstract can be read here.
Posted 3 years ago
Los Angeles Business Journal - "Pasadena-Based HMRI Names New CEO"
Post Date: July 16, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: research
Huntington Medical Research Institutes, an independent biomedical research center in Pasadena, announced June 27 it appointed Julia Bradsher as chief executive. You can read the rest of the article here.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner is quoted in an article in Mel Magazine regarding drug users monitoring their cardiovascular responses with tech devices such as Fitbits and Apple watches”
Post Date: July 13, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: apple

The Men Who Wear Fitbits to Track Their Coke Benders

Human beings are innovators. You can hardly create a product before somebody’s come up with a use for it you never considered. (Even Viagra was originally developed as a pill to lower blood pressure — erections were merely a side effect.)

So I don’t think we can be too surprised that people are using fitness trackers to monitor their vitals while taking recreational drugs. As CNBC first reported, some drug users find wearable devices like the Apple Watch and the Fitbit helpful in managing their intake of stimulants, which tend to get your heart rate up. They reason that by keeping their heart below a certain threshold of beats per minute (bpm) while high, they can lessen the always-present risk of an acute cardiac event. And so, ever since the consumer technology to keep tabs on your pulse 24/7 first became available, they’ve been sharing health data from their binges in online drug forums like the r/cocaine subreddit, for example:

Clearly, you can see one of coke’s (multifarious) effects on your body in real time with these gadgets strapped to your wrist. But what is the practical value of that information, if any?

I got in touch with “X,” a 19-year-old male redditor who frequents r/cocaine and tracks his bpm while indulging in his favorite intoxicants, which include alcohol and the anti-anxiety tranquilizer Xanax, as well as coke. He says that while his Apple Watch is mostly “shitty,” its heart rate monitoring feature is “the best and most useful thing about it.” His interest in the data depends on what he’s taking, of course: “For Xanax I make sure [my heart rate] doesn’t fall under a certain number,” he explains, while with coke he wants to avoid “going over a certain number.”

And the numbers are certain. “My resting heart rate is usually 80. If I’m on Xanax I usually don’t want it dropping under 50,” X says. “And on coke, anything above 140 is when I stop. If it’s falling too low while on Xanax, then it’s okay, because I can just go take a nap and stop drinking if I was. On coke, if it starts getting too high, I’ll take a Xanax to calm my heart rate down.”

I ask X if this method of dosing feels more reliable than what most everyone else has had to do throughout the history of inebriation — go with their gut instinct. “Yes, it is,” he says, though he’ll rely on his own best judgment as well, particularly in a party setting. Speaking of which: The fitness tracker binge, like cocaine itself, is a rather social phenomenon. “The first time I did it,” X explains, was “with people who have done it for a long time, so then after I just learned from them.” Later, he got his friends with wearables to monitor their heart rates as well, and they share their bpm often, whether hanging out together or not. “Some of us have higher tolerances, so we use it to keep [tabs on] each other,” he says.

Sounds pretty responsible, doesn’t it? Dr. Robert A. Kloner, the Chief Science Officer and Director of Cardiovascular Research at Huntington Medical Research Institutes, disagrees completely. “Not a good idea,” he writes in an email when I ask him about the trend. “It will lead people to have a false sense of security.”

Not only is Kloner an expert on the heart and blood vessels, he also co-authored work on the cardiovascular effects of cocaine, which can be extreme. There’s more to worry about than how fast your heart is beating, he points out: “Cocaine can cause coronary artery vasospasm; increase the oxygen need of the heart by increasing contractility; it can cause the blood pressure to go up; it can cause arrhythmias; it can cause heart muscle cells to go into contracture; it has been associated with ruptured aneurysm, seizures, strokes and heart attacks,” he explains, adding that the drug can also “increase the aggregation of platelets.”

Unfortunately, your Apple Watch isn’t going to be much help in predicting anyof those dire outcomes. “Using heart rate monitoring devices only gives one physiologic parameter for a drug that has complicated effects on the cardiovascular system,” Kloner tells me, concluding that “the best way to avoid cocaine cardiotoxicity is to avoid cocaine to begin with.”

Naturally.

But it seems that X has figured out a system he likes, and he knows what to look for — at least as far as a decent high is concerned. If the coke is of a better quality, “rocky and scaley,” then he’ll notice a jump in bpm “almost instantly” after taking some, with a pulse fall-off 45 to 60 minutes later. “If it’s stepped on,” he says — which is to say cut with other ingredients — he gets the same instant bump, but a much quicker fall-off in heart rate, somewhere in the 10 to 15 minute range. And while he never wants to soar above 140 bpm, “around 120 is perfect for me,” he says. Apart from this niche functionality, he only uses the heart rate monitor “occasionally” while sleeping.

X isn’t too bothered about Apple having this data, either. “Well, yeah, sometimes it does feel weird,” he admits. “But at the same time, I do work out, so my heart rate is constantly at that point.” Besides, as the excitement of this year’s World Cup and other intense situations have proved, the causes of bpm surges during physical “inactivity” are varied and strange.

Even as drug users like X seek the equilibrium to their inebriation with the aid of heart rate monitoring, others are taking cues from the tech to pop their legally prescribed drugs.

After all, the point of a fitness tracker is to help you manage your health. Fitbits and Apple Watches may not make drug use safer, but these devices will improve, offering broader, deeper and more accurate analysis of what’s going on with our bodies, and owners will interpret that new information however they like.

For now, however, most would rather stay analog:

Miles Klee is a staff writer at MEL.

Posted 3 years ago
Pasadena Now - "Pasadena-Based Huntington Medical Research Institutes Names New CEO"
Post Date: July 3, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: Uncategorized
Pasadena-Based Huntington Medical Research Institutes Names New CEO Read the full Pasadena Now article here.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner has co-authored a paper in the Sexual Medicine Reviews titled “Cardiovascular Safety of Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibitors After Nearly 2 Decades on the Market
Post Date: July 2, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: paper
Dr. Robert Kloner has co-authored a paper in the Sexual Medicine Reviews titled “Cardiovascular Safety of Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibitors After Nearly 2 Decades on the Market The paper can be read here.
Posted 3 years ago
HMRI announces appointment of new President and Chief Executive Officer Julia Bradsher PhD, MBA
Post Date: June 28, 2018   Author: sberry   Category: bradsher
[vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][minti_image img="20447" align="center"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_column_text]After an extensive national search, Dr. Julia Bradsher has been named President and Chief Executive Officer of HMRI. Dr. Bradsher’s first day in her new role will be August 6th. Dr. Bradsher most recently served as President and CEO of the International Food Protection Training Institute (IFPTI) in Portage, Michigan from 2011 to the present. Prior to her tenure at IFPTI, she served as President and CEO of The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN), an organization focused on awareness and education regarding food allergies, informing public policy as it relates to people with food allergies, and advancing research on the cause and potential treatments. Before joining FAAN, she held leadership and management roles in the pharmaceutical industry. Dr. Bradsher has occupied adjunct faculty positions at the University of California, San Francisco; Sonoma State University; and San Francisco State University, and she was a Research Scientist at the New England Research Institute. Dr. Bradsher was a post-doctoral fellow in the Pew Health Policy Program at the University of California, San Francisco Institute for Health Policy Studies. She received her PhD in medical sociology from the University of Miami, and an MBA from the Sawyer School of Management at Suffolk University in Boston. “We are most fortunate to have a professional with Julia’s management ability and scientific background joining HMRI as our new CEO,” said John Mothershead, Chair of the HMRI Board of Directors. “We anticipate great things for HMRI going forward under her leadership.”[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]
Posted 3 years ago
Karen Chu of HMRI’s Advanced Imaging Center Presenting a Poster at ISMRM in Paris
Post Date: June 19, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: Events & News
Karen Chu of HMRI’s Advanced Imaging Center presenting her poster titled “Decreased Cerebral Blood Volume Among Those with Chronic Brain Insult in HIV” at the Annual International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine in Paris, France on June 19. You can access her poster here.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Kloner, Dr. King and Dr. Harrington author a paper titled The Non-Reflow Phenomenon in Heart and Brain
Post Date: June 11, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: heart

Dr. Kloner, Dr. King and Dr. Harrington published a paper in the American Journal of Physiology, Heart and Circulatory Physiology last Friday, June 8, titled No-reflow Phenomenon in Heart and Brain. The abstract can be seen here.

Posted 3 years ago
Pasadena Outlook: "Biomedical Research Facility Opens in Pasadena"
Post Date: May 14, 2018   Author: jameskingman   Category: article
Pasadena Outlook has published an article on HMRI in the paper's Thursday, May 10, 2018 edition entitled, "Biomedical Research Facility Opens in Pasadena." The article can be viewed here.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner is quoted in an article in the publication TCTMD titled "Increasing Air Pollution May Spark Sudden Cardiac Death in Women.”
Post Date: May 10, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: article

Dr. Robert Kloner is quoted in an article in the publication TCTMD titled Increasing Air Pollution May Spark Sudden Cardiac Death in Women. 

You can read the article here.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner is co-author on a paper titled "A New Perspective on the Nitrate-Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibitor Interaction"
Post Date: May 9, 2018   Author: jameskingman   Category: Events & News
Dr. Robert Kloner is coauthor on a paper titled "A New Perspective on the Nitrate-Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibitor Interaction", published by The Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics. The review can be read here.
Posted 3 years ago
Pasadena Star News: "Pasadena's Bioscience Industry Is Rapidly Gaining Traction"
Post Date: May 7, 2018   Author: jameskingman   Category: Events & News
The Pasadena Star News has published an article on HMRI and other bioscience and biotech organizations in Pasadena. It can be viewed below by clicking on the article's title: https://www.pasadenastarnews.com/2018/05/07/pasadenas-bioscience-industry-is-rapidly-gaining-traction/
Posted 3 years ago
HMRI Scientists Attend Experimental Biology Conference in San Diego
Post Date: April 30, 2018   Author: jameskingman   Category: april

HMRI scientists presented posters and papers on their research at the Experimental Biology Conference in San Diego, CA, April 21 through April 24, 2018.

Posted 3 years ago
Los Angeles Business Journal: 'Flintstones to Jetsons': New Huntington biomed lab in Pasadena seen as hub for research, collaboration
Post Date: April 23, 2018   Author: jameskingman   Category: article
The Los Angeles Business Journal has just published an article on HMRI's new biomed lab entitled, "'Flintstones to Jetsons': New Huntington biomed lab in Pasadena seen as hub for researchers, collaborators." The article can be viewed here.
Posted 3 years ago
Pasadena Now: Pasadena's BioMedical Corridor Welcomes Huntington Medical Research Institutes' New Glass-Walled Laboratory Facility
Post Date: April 20, 2018   Author: jameskingman   Category: article
Pasadena Now has released an article on Huntington Medical Research Institutes' grand opening of its new world-class research facility in Pasadena. The article can be viewed at the link below: http://www.pasadenanow.com/main/pasadenas-biomedical-corridor-welcomes-huntington-medical-research-institutes-new-glass-walled-laboratory-facility/#.Wtn6UqJKvOU
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner coauthor on a review titled Guidelines for Experimental Models of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction
Post Date: April 18, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: american
Dr. Robert Kloner is coauthor on a review titled Guidelines for Experimental Models of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction published by The American Physiology Society. The review can be read here.   April 2019 Update:  The American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology recognized the article with the Best Paper Award 2018 Review Article. The article was a joint effort of international experts in the field of heart attack research to come up with standards and guidelines to use for those investigators who are studying therapies to reduce the amount of damage that occurs during a heart attack.
Posted 3 years ago
HMRI's Cardiovascular Team publishes a new paper titled No-Reflow Phenomenon. A New Target for Therapy of Acute Myocardial Infarction Independent of Myocardial Infarct Size.
Post Date: April 17, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: myocardial

Dr. Robert Kloner, Dr. Wangde Dai and Sharon L. Hale recently published a paper in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics titled "No-Reflow Phenomenon. A New Target for Therapy of Acute Myocardial Infarction Independent of Myocardial Infarct Size."

The paper can be read here.

Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Kevin King is first author on a new published paper titled Detrimental effect of systemic vascular risk factors on brain hemodynamic function assessed with MRI.
Post Date: April 17, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: blood

Dr. Kevin King is first author on a new published paper titled Detrimental effect of systemic vascular risk factors on brain hemodynamic function assessed with MRI.  The work found low brain blood flow was associated with high triglyceride levels.  They confirmed the decrease in blood flow was due to a vascular disease by also showing that there was greater extraction of oxygen from the blood. The work is the first to show an association between high triglycerides and brain blood flow and the first to show associations between blood flow and vascular risk factors using MRI.

The paper can be read here.

Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Myron Tong is first author on a new published paper titled An expert concensus for the management for chronic hepatitis in Asian Americans
Post Date: March 7, 2018   Author: dstrickland   Category: americans
Dr. Myron Tong is first author on a new published paper titled An expert concensus for the management for chronic hepatitis in Asian Americans with the aim of generating recommendations for the management of Asian Americans with HBV. The paper can be read here.
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Andrea Loewendorf author on new paper titled Maternal-Fetal Rejection Reactions are Unconstrained in Pre-eclamptic Women.
Post Date: January 5, 2018   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
Dr. Andrea Loewendorf is the author of a new paper entitled Maternal-Fetal rejection reactions are unconstrained in preeclamptic women. It was published in PlosOne on November 27, 2017. The article can be viewed here.

2017

Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner, Interim Chief Science Officer, collaborates on The Oxygen Paradox, the French Paradox and Age-Related Diseases
Post Date: December 21, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
Dr. Robert Kloner, Interim Chief Science Officer, Vice President of Translation and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Institute at HMRI recently collaborated on a research paper entitled The Oxygen Paradox, the French Paradox and age-related diseases, published in the December 2017 issue of the journal Geroscience. Please click on the attached pdf document to access the paper and the list of authors. Paradox-Position-Paper-GeroScience-2017.pdf
Posted 3 years ago
Dr. Wangde Dai, Dr. Robert A. Kloner, Jianru Shi, Juan Carreno and collaborators recently published a paper titled Effect of Diabetes on Myocardial Infarct and No Reflow Size in an Experimental Rat Model and Clinical Trial in the Journal of Clinical and Experimental Cardiology. Their research was funded by a grant from Servier.
Post Date: December 15, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
The paper can be viewed here.
Posted 4 years ago
HMRI Mourns the Passing of Julie Manning, Longtime Member of the Altadena Guild of Huntington Hospital and Dear Friend of HMRI
Post Date: October 12, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
HMRI is mourning the passing of Julie Manning, longtime member of the Altadena Guild of Huntington Hospital, which supports HMRI, and dear friend of HMRI over the years.  Julie passed away peacefully on October 2.  Among many other activities, Julie served as chair of the Golf Tournament and multiple times as Chair of the Guild’s Home Tour, an annual event each May that raises funds for HMRI and other organizations that work with Huntington Hospital. Every holiday season, Julie and some of her fellow Guild members brought joy and cheer to 99 North El Molino by decorating the lobby and the Christmas tree.  We will all miss her smile, her amazing creativity and her love of life. We send our deepest condolences to Julie’s family and friends.
Posted 4 years ago
Dr. Michael Harrington author on new paper on migraine titled Metabolic Assessment of a Migraine Model Using Relaxation-Enhanced 1H Spectroscopy at Ultrahigh Field
Post Date: September 26, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
Dr. Michael Harrington is an author on a new paper published by the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine entitled "Metabolic Assessment of a Migraine Model Using Relaxation-Enhanced 1H Spectroscopy at Ultrahigh Field."  Read More
Posted 4 years ago
Dr. Kloner publishes "Mitochondrial Protective Agents for Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury"
Post Date: September 19, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
Please follow this link to Dr. Robert Kloner's recent article entitled Mitochondrial Protective Agents for Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in the Circulations: Cardiovascular Interventions journal of the American Heart Association.  Click Here
Posted 4 years ago
Check out HMRI's latest newsletter
Post Date: August 30, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
Click here to open or download a PDF of the newsletter: Summer 2017
Posted 4 years ago
Congratulations to Frank Davis on receiving this distinguished award -- SRA International – Excellence Award – Advanced Level!
Post Date: August 22, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
August 21, 2017 Frank Davis VP of Finance Huntington Medical Research Institutes 99 N. El Molino Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101   RE: SRA International – Excellence Award – Advanced Level Dear Frank: On behalf of the Board of Directors of the Society of Research Administrators International, I am pleased to announce you have been selected as the recipient of the SRAI Excellence Award – Advanced Level for 2017. Congratulations! This award is presented to you in recognition of your contributions to the knowledge of research administrators, as well as your dedication to the continuous study and development of the field. The award results from your “strong advocacy for SRAI” as well as your “mentorship and devoted encouragement to your staff and others” in our profession. On behalf of the Board of Directors, I hope you will be able to attend the 2017 SRA International Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada. The awards presentation will be held during the Annual Business Meeting and Awards Breakfast on Tuesday, October 17, 8:00 am - 9:15 am. Each award recipient will be officially recognized during this important event. Ms. Dilyana Williams, our SRAI Headquarters staff member will contact you shortly to confirm your attendance. The Society’s membership appreciates your continued dedication to the work of research administration. Thanks so much for all you have done and will likely do in future years in your career. Thank you! Sincerely, Cindy Kiel President
Society of Research Administrators International 1560 Wilson Boulevard | Suite 310 Arlington, VA 22209 srainternational.org
Posted 4 years ago
Dr. Bob Kloner publishes article on "The Importance of No-Reflow/Microvascular Obstruction in the STEMI Patient"
Post Date: July 28, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
See Dr. Bob Kloner's article in the European Heart Journal on "The Importance of No-Reflow/Microvascular Obstruction in the STEMI Patient:" https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article-abstract/doi/10.1093/eurheartj/ehx288/4049551/The-importance-of-noreflowmicrovascular
Posted 4 years ago
Dr. Bob Kloner and team publish article on "New and Revisited Approaches to Preserving the Reperfused Myocardium"
Post Date: July 28, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
See latest publication in Nature Review Cardiology by HMRIers Kloner, Dai, Hale and Shi here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28748958
Posted 4 years ago
HMRI Welcomes New Board Member: Sonia Singla, DO
Post Date: July 24, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
portrait-kaur (2) Sonia Singla, DO - Medical Director, Lotus Clinical Research   Dr. Singla is a board-certified physician with over 15 years of experience in analgesic research.  She received her BA in Chemistry from Kent State University and her medical degree from College of Osteopathic Medicine at Western University in Pomona, CA.  She completed her residency in Family Practice at Pomona Valley Medical Center in Pomona, CA. Dr. Singla served as the medical monitor, principal investigator, or sub investigator on over 200 pain studies.  In her current capacity, she provides medical oversight of the Lotus Clinical Research investigative team to ensure proper study conduct and optimal patient safety, and is responsible for liaising with the sponsor’s chief medical officer.  She also spearheads Lotus Clinical Research’s internal placebo response staff education training program.  From 2008-2011, Dr. Singla served as the chairman of the Glendale Adventist Hospital IRB.  She is active in San Gabriel Valley nonprofit community, working with the Pasadena Village, Foothill Family, Cancer Support Community, Young & Healthy, the Pasadena Art Alliance and the Pasadena Community Foundation.  She and her husband, Neil K. Singla, MD, have three children and live in Pasadena.
Posted 4 years ago
Looking Through the Eye of an iPhone - An Ejection Fraction Measurement for the Masses
Post Date: July 19, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
Click on this link to see the Editorial in Critical Care Medicine (July 2017, Volume 45, Number 7) about former HMRI-Caltech Boswell Fellow Dr. Niema Pahlevan and his novel use of an iPhone to measure ejection fraction: http://journals.lww.com/ccmjournal/Citation/2017/07000/An_Ejection_Fraction_Measurement_for_the_Masses_.18.aspx
Posted 4 years ago
Altadena Guild Presents Check for $65,000 to HMRI
Post Date: June 16, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
Read more about the gift in the Pasadena Weekly here: https://www.pasadenaweekly.com/2017/06/15/bulletin-board-06-15-17/
Posted 4 years ago
HMRI Receives Award from Pasadena Community Foundation
Post Date: June 15, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
HMRI received a $1,500 award (in the Health category) from the Pasadena Community Foundation at their 18th Annual Local Heroes Celebration breakfast on June 15, 2017. 2017 Local Heroes Invite  
Posted 4 years ago
This week at the Pasadena Rotary Club, Dr. Michael Harrington spoke on Alzheimer's Disease (six million Americans have it)
Post Date: June 9, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
This week at the Pasadena Rotary Club, Dr. Michael Harrington spoke on Alzheimer's Disease. Six million Americans have Alzheimer's disease. Last year, for the first time, longevity declined by a year. The biggest factor in that decrease was Alzheimer's. http://www.pasadenarotary.com/node/1174  
Posted 4 years ago
Abstract by Dr. Andrea Loewendorf accepted for poster presentation at the International Federation of Placenta Associations (IFPA) 2017 conference in Manchester, UK
Post Date: May 24, 2017   Author: tlgadmin   Category: Events & News
 Title:
Understanding the Immune Microenvironment at the Uteroplacental Interface.
OBJECTIVES In human pregnancy, the baby is 50% non-self, but is not rejected as an allogeneic organ transplant would be. The local interaction site between mother and baby is the uteroplacental interface (UPI), where maternal decidua develops between the uterus and the fetal placenta. We seek to understand the local immune microenvironment of the UPI to identify the critical factors mediating maintenance of maternal – fetal tolerance. METHODS Using a novel, non-invasive sampling method, we isolated lymphocytes from the surgical sponge used to clean the uterus after C-section, and compared them to the peripheral blood (PB) of 3rd trimester healthy pregnant women. RESULTS The term UPI lymphocyte pool contained a similar proportion of CD3+ cells (~62%) vs. PB but within the CD3- fraction, NK cells were significantly enriched (CD56hiCD16- PB 1.86% +/- 0.36, UPI 19.84 +/- 3.14, p<0.0001. CD56loCD16+ PB 24.22 +/-4.15 UPI 50.53+/- 3.17 p<0.0001) while monocytes/macrophages were decreased (PB 22.64 +/- 1.43, UPI 6.05 +/- 0.95). Intracellular cytokines in gd T cells (IFNg, TNFa, and Granzyme A) and NK cells (Perforin A and Granzyme A) were significantly elevated at the UPI vs. PB. Further, CD56hi CD16- uterine NK cells but not PB NK cells exclusively displayed an activated (CD69+) phenotype and a significantly more of the apoptosis-inducing molecule Fas (mean PB 21.74 +/- 4.5; mean UPI 43.61 +/- 2.02 p=0.0007). CONCLUSION The dramatic differences in cell type proportions, phenotypes and functionality we observed between lymphocytes at the UPI vs PB indicate a specific local immune microenvironment that develops at the UPI. The signals – and mechanisms that attract and retain lymphocytes at the UPI are unknown but likely important for understanding of how the necessary tolerogenic environment for successful pregnancy is established and maintained. http://www.ifpa2017.org/
Posted 4 years ago
Support HMRI. Join us for “A Stroll in the Altadena Highlands” on Sunday, May 7th
Post Date: April 21, 2017   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Click above to view the flyer for details.
Posted 4 years ago
The Science Behind Your Mind
Post Date: April 7, 2017   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

The Science Behind Your MindThe Science Behind Your Mind

Dr. Harrington joined HMRI and established the Molecular Neurology Program in 1998.  He studies how the cerebrospinal fluid composition explains the intermittent disorder of migraine and the progressive neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease.  He also studies molecules that are transported to/from the brain in blood (including changes after mild traumatic brain injury), and those excreted in urine.  Mike enjoys collaborating with other clinical and scientific colleagues that apply complementary measure of brain function so as to gain as much information from teh same study participants.

Event Details

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017 From: 6:30pm - 7:30pm at Kensington 245 West Sierra Madre Blvd. Sierra Madre, CA 91024 (626) 355-5700

Download the Event Flyer

 
Posted 4 years ago
Therapeutic Hypothermia Reduces the Inflammatory Response Following Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rat Hearts
Post Date: April 3, 2017   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28338422

Therapeutic Hypothermia Reduces the Inflammatory Response Following Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rat Hearts

Shi J1,2, Dai W1,2, Kloner RA1,2. Author information Abstract Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is known to protect against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. One mechanism of I/R injury includes secondary injury due to the inflammatory cascade. We hypothesized that TH reduces the inflammatory response following I/R injury. Rats were randomized to sham, normothermic, or hypothermic groups and subjected to 1 hour of coronary artery occlusion and 48 hours of reperfusion. Hypothermia was initiated, using the ThermoSuit device, 2 minutes after the onset of coronary artery occlusion to a core temperature of 32°C, and then the rats were allowed to rewarm. After 48 hours, rats in the hypothermia group demonstrated a preserved left ventricular fractional shortening by echocardiography. TH decreased the inflammatory cytokines in the risk zone of the heart, which included monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression, and altered expression of the remodeling genes of matrix metalloproteinase and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase. Furthermore, rat inflammatory cytokines & receptors PCR array was performed and the data showed that 71 out of 84 genes were upregulated in the risk zone of normothermia hearts versus shams. The upregulation was largely reversed in the risk zone of hypothermia hearts compared to normothermia. TH preserves cardiac function, decreases excessive inflammatory gene expression, and regulates myocardial matrix remodeling related genes. KEYWORDS: hypothermia; inflammation; myocardial infarction PMID: 28338422 DOI: 10.1089/ther.2016.0042
Posted 4 years ago
Pasadena Middle Schoolers Learn About the Brain from Top Researchers
Post Date: March 9, 2017   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
PASADENA, Calif. (KABC) --Hundreds of Pasadena middle schoolers got the chance to experience Brain Awareness Day first hand by learning about brain health from top researchers. Neuroscientists use helmets to track the brain's electrical activity. Seeing it in action encouraged Blair Middle Schoolers to fire up their own thinking caps.
By Denise Dador Wednesday, March 08, 2017 07:38PM
Read the rest of the article here on the ABC 7 website
Posted 4 years ago
Blair Middle School Students Marvel at Human Brains (in Jars) and More on National Brain Awareness Day
Post Date: March 9, 2017   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Blair Middle School Students marveled at the rare sight of human brains in jars and hands-on demonstrations about how the brain functions from leading scientists, doctors and researchers from Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) in celebration of National Brain Awareness Day on Wednesday. “This is a terrific opportunity for Pasadena Unified students to learn from experts and interact with leading scientists,” said Dr. Marisa Sarian, Pasadena Unified’s Assistant Superintendent of Secondary Education.
From STAFF REPORTS 6:27 am | March 9, 2017
Read the rest of the article here on the Pasadena Now website
Posted 4 years ago
Blair Middle School Hosts Brain Awareness Day
Post Date: March 6, 2017   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
The Pasadena Unified School District’s (PUSD) Health Careers Academy is partnering with Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) to raise awareness about brain health and disease among youth. Blair Middle School seventh and eighth grades will hear from leading doctors, researchers, and scientists during the third annual Brain Awareness Day, Wednesday, March 8, 2017, from 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. on the middle school campus, located at 1135 S. Euclid Ave., Pasadena. The day will feature lessons, exhibits, and hands-on learning activities presented by students who worked with HMRI scientists. The event is open to the public from 3 p.m. – 5 p.m..
Article and Photo courtesy of PUSD and HMRI Published : Monday, March 6, 2017 | 12:49 PM
Read the rest of the article here on the Pasadena Now website
Posted 4 years ago
Management of No-Reflow Phenomenon in the Catheterization Laboratory
Post Date: February 14, 2017   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Link: (Display the citation in PubMed)
  1. JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2017 Feb 13;10(3):215-223. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2016.11.059.

Management of No-Reflow Phenomenon in the Catheterization Laboratory.

Rezkalla SH1, Stankowski RV2, Hanna J3, Kloner RA4. Author information: · 1Department of Cardiology, Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, Wisconsin. Electronic address: rezkalla.shereif@marshfieldclinic.org. · 2Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wisconsin. · 3Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · 4Huntington Medical Research Institute, Pasadena, California; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. Abstract At the conclusion of a primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, and after the cardiologist makes certain that there is no residual stenosis following stenting, assessment of coronary flow becomes the top priority. The presence of no-reflow is a serious prognostic sign. No-reflow can result in poor healing of the infarct and adverse left ventricular remodeling, increasing the risk for major adverse cardiac events, including congestive heart failure and death. To achieve normal flow, features associated with a high incidence of no-reflow must be anticipated, and measures must be undertaken to prevent its occurrence. In this review, the authors discuss various preventive strategies for no-reflow as well as pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions that improve coronary blood flow, such as intracoronary adenosine and nitroprusside. Nonpharmacological therapies, such as induced hypothermia, were successful in animal studies, but their effectiveness in reducing no-reflow in humans remains to be determined. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. PMID: 28183461 [PubMed - in process]
Posted 4 years ago
2017 HMRI Publications
Post Date: January 23, 2017   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Publications
Dai W, Hale S, Kloner RA. Delayed therapeutic hypothermia protects against the myocardial no-reflow phenomenon independently of myocardial infarct size in a rat ischemia/reperfusion model. Int J Cardiol. 2017 Jan 12. pii: S0167-5273(16)34021-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.01.079. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 28108128
Posted 4 years ago
Steelers got you stressed? Try meditation, expert says
Post Date: January 23, 2017   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Regarding the Super Bowl and stress… “The concerns of the stress of merely watching a game are real,” said Robert Kloner, cardiologist and researcher at Huntington Medical Research Institutes in Pasadena. Research he and his colleagues have done found that there was a connection between cardiac-related mortality rates in the hometowns of some Super Bowl teams that either won or lost. “In the hometowns of teams that lost — including Los Angeles in 1980 when the Steelers beat the Los Angeles Rams — “We found an increase in overall death and cardiac death” in the four days after the Super Bowl, he said. “But in towns that won — including Pittsburgh in 2009 when the Steelers beat the Arizona Cardinals — “circulatory-related deaths actually went down,” he said. See full article here: http://www.post-gazette.com/news/health/2017/01/22/Steelers-got-you-stressed-Try-meditation-expert-says/stories/201701220126  
Posted 4 years ago
Heart Health Breakthrough 3: A double-duty diabetes drug?
Post Date: January 17, 2017   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
The challenge: Diabetes and heart disease often go hand in hand. “So many diabetic patients get cardiovascular disease, and of patients who have cardiovascular problems, those with diabetes do worse,” says HMRI’s Kloner in http://www.lifescript.com/special/lifescript_for_him/heart_health/articles/breakthroughs_in_the_fight_against_heart_disease.aspx  
Posted 4 years ago
HMRI Insights Newsletter - Winter 2017
Post Date: January 9, 2017   Author: adminhmri321   Category: HMRI Newsletters
Inside this issue: Click here to download our Newsletter in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. You will need the free Acrobat Reader software to read or print these documents.
  • HMRI Board of Directors Welcomes Renowned HMRI Researcher Bill Agnew as Emeritus Director
  • New Leadership in HMRI Philanthropy
  • From the President’s Desk: Lessons From The Building
  • Yasushi Ohnuki PhD by Lawrence W. Jones MD
  • The Future is Under Way
  • Advanced Multi-Nuclear MRS Spectroscopy Workshop at HMRI: April 8 – 10, 2016
  • Cardiovascular Disease Research Director, Robert A. Kloner MD, PhD, Awarded Major Grant
  • Donor Spotlight: The Patron Saints Foundation

2016

Posted 4 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner on KNX-AM/CBS News Radio
Post Date: December 28, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Audio
Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD, Director of the HMRI Cardiovascular Research Institute was recently KNX-AM/CBS News Radio to discuss heart attacks.
Posted 4 years ago
Mental Tests May Lead to Early Detection of Alzheimer's
Post Date: December 19, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
ABC 7 Los Angeles PASADENA, Calif. (KABC) -- How can you tell if forgetfulness is typical brain aging or something more serious, like Alzheimer's? A Pasadena researcher is looking into how answering a few questions may help pick up early signs of the disease. Dr. Mike Harrington and his colleagues at the Huntington Medical Research Institutes created a brain challenge to detect signs of Alzheimer's in its early stages. Read the rest of the article here: http://abc7.com/1660871/  
Posted 4 years ago
Angina and Its Management
Post Date: December 19, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD Bernard Chaitman, MD Abstract: Angina pectoris is defined as substernal chest pain, pressure, or discomfort that is typically exacerbated by exertion and/or emotional stress, lasts greater than 30 to 60 seconds, and is relieved by rest and nitroglycerin. There are approximately 10 million people in the United States who have angina, and there are over 500 000 cases diagnosed per year. Several studies now show that angina itself is a predictor of major adverse cardiac events. In addition, angina is a serious morbidity that impedes quality of life and should be treated. In the United States, pharmacologic therapy for angina includes β-blockers, nitrates, calcium channel blockers, and the late sodium current blocker ranolazine. In other countries, additional pharmacologic agents include trimetazidine, ivabradine, nicorandil, fasudil, and others. Revascularization is indicated in certain high-risk individuals and also has been shown to improve angina. However, even after revascularization, a substantial percentage of patients return with recurrent or continued angina, requiring newer and better therapies. Treatment for refractory angina not amenable to usual pharmacologic therapies or revascularization procedures, includes enhanced external counterpulsation, transmyocardial revascularization, and stem cell therapy. Angina continues to be a significant cause of morbidity. Therapy should be geared not only to treating the risk factors for atherosclerotic disease and improving survival but should also be aimed at eliminating or reducing the occurrence of angina and improving the ability of patients to be active. Read the rest of this research article here: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1074248416679733  
Posted 4 years ago
Brain challenge test might be able to predict Alzheimer's decades earlier
Post Date: December 15, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
ABC KSAT 12, San Antonio, TX LOS ANGELES. (Ivanhoe Newswire) - Right now, a spinal fluid test can signal Alzheimer’s disease up to twenty years before clinical onset. The proteins beta-amyloid and tau are established markers of Alzheimer’s, and changes in their levels may signal disease. Someday, a simple test at the computer and non-invasive EEG scan may do the same thing. Read the rest of the article here: http://www.ksat.com/health/brain-challenge-test-might-be-able-to-predict-alzheimers-decades-earlier  
Posted 4 years ago
Bio-med heavyweights partner up on sleep apnea treatment, Alzheimer’s detection
Post Date: December 15, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Kevin Smith, San Gabriel Valley Tribune Innovation is vital in the medical world, but how can you effectively gauge the market potential of new products and treatments? That’s the idea behind Huntington Medical Research Institutes’ newly forged relationship with Keck Graduate Institute. Read the rest of the article here: http://www.pasadenastarnews.com/business/20161213/bio-med-heavyweights-partner-up-on-sleep-apnea-treatment-alzheimers-detection  
Posted 5 years ago
Cardioprotective Effects of Mitochondria-Targeted Peptide SBT-20 in two Different Models of Rat Ischemia/Reperfusion
Post Date: October 20, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Wangde Dai Elissa Cheung Rick J. Alleman Justin B. Perry Mitchell E. Allen David A. Brown Robert A. Kloner Purpose: Dysfunctional mitochondria are considered to be the major source of intracellular reactive oxygen species and play a central role in the pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. This study sought to determine effects of mitochondria-targeted cytoprotective peptide SBT-20 on myocardial infarct size in two different models of ischemia/reperfusion. Read the abstract here: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10557-016-6695-9  
Posted 5 years ago
Cardioprotection: Where to from here?
Post Date: October 12, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

Abstract

Kloner, R.A., Hale, S.L., Dai, W., Shi, J. Cardiovasc Drugs Ther. (2016 Oct 6) doi:10.1007/s10557-016-6691-0 The size of the myocardial infarction remains an important therapeutic target, because heart attack size correlates with mortality and heart failure. In this era, myocardial infarct size is reduced primarily by timely re-perfusion of the infarct related coronary artery. Whereas numerous pre-clinical studies have shown that certain pharmacological agents and therapeutic maneuvers reduce myocardial infarction size greater than re-perfusion alone, very few of these therapies have translated to successful clinical trials or standard clinical use. In this review we discuss both the recent successes as well as recent disappointments, and describe some of the newer potential therapies from the pre-clinical literature that have not yet been tested in clinical trials. Read the rest of the article here: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10557-016-6691-0  
Posted 5 years ago
HMRI Insights Newsletter - Fall 2016
Post Date: September 9, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: HMRI Newsletters
Inside this issue: Click here to download our Newsletter in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. You will need the free Acrobat Reader software to read or print these documents.
  • Under the Microscope: Enhancing The Physician Scientist Workforce
  • Fond Memories of Leo Bullara
  • 65th Annual Home Tour Benefits HMRI
  • Introductions to the newest Board of Directors members
  • Donor Spotlight: John & Genevieve Lucas, The Lucas Brothers Foundation
Posted 5 years ago
Got migraines? Join a Pasadena research effort that seeks a cure
Post Date: September 8, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

Got migraines? Join a Pasadena research effort that seeks a cure

LARRY WILSON SEPTEMBER 6, 2016 www.pasadenastarnews.com “We’re lucky in the Pasadena area to have world-class researchers on many diseases, and I’ve enjoyed over the years writing about the work of Scottish neurologist Dr. Michael Harrington at the Huntington Medical Research Institutes, and participating a little in some research. As he searches for causes and disease markers and possible cures for migraines, Harrington, sometimes still working with Cowan, has enlisted me in getting the word out to local migraineurs. Last time I emceed an event featuring Serene Branson, the CBS 2 reporter whose garbled speech from the Grammys five years ago made viewers think she had suffered an on-air stroke. It was instead a complex migraine, and she has become an activist about the disease, too. Have headaches, and want to join us in helping researchers make us better? Know someone who fits the bill? On Sept. 8, Harrington is recruiting people with chronic migraine and post-traumatic headache for a six-week study with a public meeting from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at HMRI, 99 N. El Molino Ave., Pasadena. On Saturday, Sept. 10, from 2 to 3 p.m., he’s doing the same for those 70 to 90 for a study on aging and Alzheimer’s. Interested, or have questions? Call Betty Chung, 626-795-4343. While a headache will remain a headache, when you get involved in the work to explore the causes of a disease, you’ll come to new understandings, and in doing so feel better already.” Read the rest of the article here: http://www.pasadenastarnews.com/opinion/20160906/got-migraines-join-a-pasadena-research-effort-that-seeks-a-cure-larry-wilson  
Posted 5 years ago
Cranial dural permeability of inflammatory nociceptive mediators: Potential implications for animal models of migraine
Post Date: August 16, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Jun Zhao1,2 Dara Bree1,2 Michael G Harrington3 Andrew M Strassman1,2 Dan Levy1,2⇑ Conclusions The finding that the cranial meninges are permeable to the two tested inflammatory mediators PGE2 and 5-HT raises some uncertainty about whether the behavioral changes observed in prior pre-clinical headache studies with these as well as other agents can be attributed entirely to the activation of dural nociceptors, particularly when the agents are applied at concentrations several orders of magnitude above physiological levels. Read the abstract here: http://cep.sagepub.com/content/early/2016/08/04/0333102416663466.abstract  
Posted 5 years ago
Does eating more salt prevent migraines and severe headaches?
Post Date: August 15, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

A bit of salt might stop headaches’ battery of the brain

Jessica Hamzelou August 8, 2016 www.newscientist.com Could a salty diet keep migraines at bay? People who eat a lot of salt report having fewer migraines and severe headaches – the first evidence that dietary sodium may affect the condition. But the researchers caution that more evidence is needed before people change their diets, given that high salt consumption is linked to heart disease and stroke. There is growing evidence linking migraines with sodium. During a migraine, levels of sodium have been found to rise in cerebrospinal fluid, the liquid that bathes the brain and central nervous system. And sodium levels in this liquid seem to peak in the early morning and late afternoon – times of day when people commonly report experiencing migraines. Read the rest of the article here: https://www.newscientist.com/article/2101015-does-eating-more-salt-prevent-migraines-and-severe-headaches  
Posted 5 years ago
Association of Serum Docosahexaenoic Acid With Cerebral Amyloidosis
Post Date: August 15, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

Association of Serum Docosahexaenoic Acid With Cerebral Amyloidosis

August 8, 2016 http://archneur.jamanetwork.com/ Importance Higher dietary intake of the essential fatty acid docosahexaenoic (DHA) has been associated with better cognitive performance in several epidemiological studies. Animal and in vitro studies also indicate that DHA prevents amyloid deposition in the brain. Objective To determine the association between serum DHA levels, cerebral amyloidosis, and the volumes of brain areas affected by Alzheimer disease. Read the rest of the article here: http://archneur.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2538230  
Posted 5 years ago
Food for thought--HMRI investigators contribute to findings that link fish intake and Alzheimer's at the molecular level
Post Date: August 15, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

Less Salmon, More Plaques? Link Between Omega-3s and Aβ Reinvigorates Fish Oil Debate

August 12, 2016 http://www.alzforum.org/ Omega-3 fatty acids as an intervention for Alzheimer’s disease may not be dead in the water just yet. A new study may reinvigorate interest in the fish oils. Researchers led by Helena Chui at the University of Southern California have used PET and MRI scans to correlate markers of Alzheimer’s disease with blood levels of the essential fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). They report that people with the least amount of DHA have the most amyloid and atrophy in brain regions associated with AD. The findings, published August 8 in JAMA Neurology, do not prove that DHA blocks AD pathology, however they do mesh well with animal studies suggesting the fatty acid thwarts Aβ accumulation. “The … study has the potential to rekindle interest in the therapeutic potential of DHA,” wrote Joseph Quinn of Oregon Health & Sciences University in Portland in an editorial that accompanied the paper. Quinn headed a previous DHA clinical trial, but was not involved in the current study. Read the rest of the article here: http://www.alzforum.org/news/research-news/less-salmon-more-plaques-link-between-omega-3s-and-av-reinvigorates-fish-oil  
Posted 5 years ago
Migraine Headache Causes And Symptoms 2016: Everything You Need To Know
Post Date: August 10, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

Migraine Headache Causes And Symptoms 2016: Everything You Need To Know

Michael Harrington, MB, ChB, FRCP Director of Neurosciences at Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) Pasadena, California - August 8, 2016 www.medicaldaily.com Migraine is the third most common disease in the world. It costs American employers $20 billion each year, and considering how widespread and the suffering it causes are, it’s safe to say research funding is meager at best. The National Institutes of Health provides the mainstay of medical funding in the United States, about $20 million annually — but funding should be 12-fold higher if it will be comparable to research dollars allotted for other brain diseases such as schizophrenia. A ‘typical’ migraine headache is severe: One-sided, pulsing or throbbing, accompanied by severe pain and discomfort to normal lights, sounds, or smells, not to mention nausea and vomiting. It typically lasts four to 72 hours, during which the scalp can be extremely sensitive to the touch. So it’s not unusual for migraine sufferers — also known as migraineurs — to withdraw from the outside world to lie down without moving in a dark, quiet room. But the truth is, the realities of life often prevent this form of relief. Read the rest of the article here: http://www.medicaldaily.com/migraine-headache-causes-and-symptoms-2016-everything-you-need-know-394142  
Posted 5 years ago
Go Nuts to Age Well: 6 Benefits of Nuts for Older Adults
Post Date: August 10, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

Go Nuts to Age Well: 6 Benefits of Nuts for Older Adults

K. Aleisha Fetters August 5, 2016 www.health.usnews.com

A handful a day may keep the doctor – and a slew of age-related health issues – away.

Joe Biden wants cancer researchers to share their data, and he's not mincing words. “You know the inflammation that nuts are so good at fighting? Well, that's critical to preventing cognitive decline and dementia into old age. For instance, research out of Huntington Medical Research Institutes shows that in patients with Alzheimer's disease, levels of inflammation are higher, partly due to lower levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, explains Alfred Fonteh, neuroscience research scientist at HMRI. Nuts, however, are rich in omega-3s, and walnuts in particular are ripe with docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA, a type of omega-3 that is a primary structural compound in the human brain. "DHA is the source of molecules that protect neurons, molecules that resolve inflammation and molecules that help repair free radical damage of tissues," Fonteh says. "What's more, monounsaturated fatty acids rich in nuts also control how toxic proteins are removed from the brain." "Therefore, a dietary source of omega-3 fatty acids and monounsaturated fatty acids from nuts may replenish what is lost in the brain and enhance the ability of the brain to remove toxic peptides that would otherwise kill neurons," he says. Case in point: In a 2015 JAMA Internal Medicine study of older adults, those who followed a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts over the course of six years enjoyed better cognitive function than those who ate a Mediterranean diet sans nuts.” Read the rest of the article here: http://health.usnews.com/wellness/articles/2016-08-05/go-nuts-to-age-well-6-benefits-of-nuts-for-older-adults  
Posted 5 years ago
Ground-breaking day for new building
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
Liver Center
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
Molecular Neurology
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
Gene Therapy
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
Cancer Genetics
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
MRS Laboratory
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
NMR
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
Brain Tumor Immunotherapy
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
PFMR and HIAMR merge to become Huntington Medical Research Institutes
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
Prostate Cancer I – PC-3 Cell Line
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
CT Stereotactic Neurosurgery
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
Tele-Stimulator
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
Experimental Cardiology
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
IMR becomes Huntington Institute of Applied Medical Research (HIAMR)
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
PFMR’s First Electron Microscope
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
PFMR pioneers Biomedical Lasers
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
PFMR Links Smog to Cancer
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
Advanced Cobalt Therapy Laboratory
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
Mass Spectrometer Protein Studies
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
The Shunt Project
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
Safer Auto Design
Post Date: August 4, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
Institute of Medical Research (IMR)
Post Date: July 12, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
2016 HMRI Publications
Post Date: July 11, 2016   Author: jameskingman   Category: Publications
CARDIOVASCULAR RESEARCH Kloner RA, Carson III C, Dobs A, Kopecky S, Mohler III ER. Testosterone and cardiovascular disease. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2016; 67: 545-557. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2015.12.005. PMID: 26846952. Rezkalla S, Kloner RA. Cardiovascular effects of marijuana. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2016 Jan 22. Pii: 107424841 5627874. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 26801372. Kloner RA. Remote ischemic conditioning. Its benefits and limitations. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2016 Mar; 21 (2): 219-221. PMID: 26740183. Gibson CM, Giugliano RP, Kloner RA, Bode C, Tandera M, Janosi A, Merkely B, Godlewski J, Halaby R, Korjian S, Daaboul Y, Chakraborti A, Weaver D. EMBRACE STEMI study. A phase 2a trial to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of intravenous Bendavia on reperfusion injury in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention. European Heart Journal, 2016; Apr 21; 37 (16): 1296-1303. PMID: 26586786. Hausenloy DJ, Botker HE, Engstrom T, Erlinge D, Heusch G, Ibanez B, Janssen S, Kloner RA, Ovize M, Yellon DM, Garcia-Dorado D. Targeting reperfusion injury in STEMI patients: trials and tribulations. European Heart Journal, 2016; Apr 26.pii:ehw145. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 27118196. Kloner RA. Testosterone replacement therapy: New data on efficacy and cardiovascular safety. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2016 Apr 28; pii: 1074248416646938. PMID: 27127193. Kloner RA, Braunwald E. Intravenous beta-blocker for limiting myocardial infarct size: rejuvenation of a concept. J Am Coll Cardiol., 2016; May 10; 67 (18): 2105-2107. PMID: 27052689. Kloner RA, Dai W, Hale S, Shi J. Approaches to improving cardiac structure and function during and after an acute myocardial infarction: acute and chronic phases. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2016 Jul; 21 (4): 363-367. PMID: 26612091.  Chapters  Kloner RA, Hale SL. Reperfusion injury. Chapter in Myocardial Infarction: A companion to Braunwald’s Heart Disease. Ed. D Morrow. Elsevier; Philadelphia; in press 2016. Abstracts Daaboul Y, Korjian S, Weaver WD, Kloner R, Giugliano R, Carr J, Neal BJ, Chi G, Cochet M, Goodell L, Michalak N, Rusowicz-Orazem L, Alkathery T, Allaham H, Shakil M, Szlosek D, Gibson CM. The association between left ventricular mass and measures of infarct size in anterior ST-Segment elevation myocardial infarction: insights from the EMBRACE STEMI Clinical trial. J Am Coll Cardiol., 2016; 67: (13_S): 495-495. Doi: 10.1016/S0735-1097(16)30496-X. Dai W, Cheung E, Allmeann RJ, Brown DA, Kloner RA. Cardioprotective effects of mitochondria-targeted peptide SS-20 in two different models of rat ischemia/reperfusion. FASEB J, April 2016 30: 1201.13. Shi J, Dai W, Kloner RA. Therapeutic hypothermia reduces the inflammatory response following ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat hearts. FASEB J, April 2016 30: 1277-1.
Posted 5 years ago
Pasadena Foundation for Medical Research (PFMR)
Post Date: July 8, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: History of HMRI
Posted 5 years ago
Is Rise in U.S. Death Rate a Blip or a Trend?
Post Date: June 10, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

A higher death rate in 2015 can be attributed to three main causes, but many of those deaths could have been prevented.

Ann Pietrangelo June 9, 2016 www.healthline.com HMRI’s Dr. Harrington says although there’s currently no treatment known to slow or halt the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, that doesn’t mean there’s nothing we can do. “The important need is for a lot more research to seek an understanding of the neurodegeneration process that is occurring decades before any symptoms. HMRI and some other organizations are actively following this urgently needed approach,” said Harrington. Read the rest of the article here: http://www.healthline.com/health-news/rise-in-us-death-rate-blip-or-trend#5  
Posted 5 years ago
Sports Fan Science: How Watching Sports Games Affects The Mind And Body
Post Date: June 6, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

So, what exactly happens to our mind and body during the most crucial moments that have and will come to define sports history?

Lizette Borreli June 2nd, 2016 www.medicaldaily.com When there is an intense game or intense play some fans have a very emotional response — a fight-or-flight response with an increase in the sympathetic nervous system output and an increase in adrenaline levels,” Dr. Robert Kloner, director of cardiovascular research at Huntington Medical Research Institutes in Pasadena, Calif., told Medical Daily. Read the rest of the article here: http://www.medicaldaily.com/mind-and-body-sports-fan-sports-games-388444  
Posted 5 years ago
Cleaning Up The Dirty Mind: Dead Cells In Brain May Inhibit Cognitive Function In Neurodegenerative Diseases
Post Date: May 27, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

Dr. Michael Harrington, Director of Neurosciences at HMRI, weighs in on mechanisms that keep the brain clean during neurodegenerative diseases:

Lizette Borreli May 26th, 2016 www.medicaldaily.com Doing crossword puzzles and memory-training games and taking Omega-3 fish oil supplements are steps we take to boost our brain health. We do this to keep our mind clear and our head sharp, but how exactly does this process of cleaning differ between the healthy and diseased brain? According to a recent study published in the journal PLOS Biology, the brain “sweeps” clean dead neurons for it to function properly, but when it comes to neurodegenerative diseases, this cleaning process is impaired. There are mechanisms that keep the brain clean during neurodegenerative diseases. Typically, when neurons die, their debris needs to be quickly swept away for the surrounding brain tissue to continue functioning properly. There needs to be a balance between highly specialized cells, microglia, that respond by disposing of neurons that express "eat me" signals, according to Dr. Michael Harrington, Director of Neurosciences at Huntington Medical Research Institutes in Pasadena, Calif. Read the rest of the article here: http://www.medicaldaily.com/clean-dirty-mind-neurodegenerative-diseases-cognitive-function-dead-cells-387918  
Posted 5 years ago
These Subtle Symptoms Could Mean You’re Having A Heart Attack And Don’t Know It
Post Date: May 18, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

"Silent" heart attacks are a thing—and doctors say women are especially susceptible of dying from them.

Korin Miller (originally published on Self.com) “Silent heart attacks are dangerous because people who have them may not get the proper therapy for the heart attack itself and will not get the proper therapy to help prevent another one or modify the known risk factors for coronary artery disease,” Robert A. Kloner, M.D., Ph.D., director of cardiovascular research at Huntington Medical Research Institutes, tells SELF." Here is the link to article: http://www.self.com/trending/2016/05/these-subtle-symptoms-could-mean-youre-having-a-heart-attack-and-dont-know-it  
Posted 5 years ago
Pasadena's Patron Saints Foundation Gives $30,000 Grant to Huntington Medical Research Institutes to Help Construct Biomedical Research Building
Post Date: May 17, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
The Patron Saints Foundation's 30th anniversary celebration, HMRI awarded with grant for new research building Pasadena Now From: STAFF Reports Published: Monday, May 16, 2016 Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI), Pasadena’s only dedicated medical research institute, has been awarded a $30,000 grant from Pasadena-based The Patron Saints Foundation to aid in the construction of HMRI’s new biomedical research facility at 686 S. Fair Oaks Avenue. The Patron Saints Foundation, an organization that provides grants to public charities to improve the health of individuals residing in West San Gabriel Valley, has awarded more than 850 grants totaling $9.9 million since being founded in 1986. To read the original article, please visit: http://www.pasadenanow.com/main/pasadenas-patron-saints-foundation-provides-30000-grant-to-huntington-medical-research-institutes-to-help-construct-biomedical-research-building-in-pasadena/#.VztkDr6aI4U
Posted 5 years ago
Intravenous Beta-Blockade for Limiting Myocardial Infarct Size
Post Date: April 29, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

Rejuvenation of a Concept

Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD,a,b Eugene Braunwald, MD c,d (originally published in the Journal of The American College of Cardiology) Here is the link to the paper: https://content.onlinejacc.org/article.aspx?articleID=2511390  
Posted 5 years ago
HMRI Insights Newsletter - Spring 2016
Post Date: April 28, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: HMRI Newsletters
Inside this issue: Click here to download our Newsletter in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. You will need the free Acrobat Reader software to read or print these documents.
  • Huntington Memorial Hospital's Team Tanzania Plus One
  • Fighting the Good Fight - What Do Alzheimer's Heart Attacks, Eczema, Asthma, Preeclampsia, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Allergies and Cancer all have in common?
  • Welcome to the newest members of HMRI's Board of Directors
  • In Memoriam: Ann Slavik Hall
  • Through the Microscope: Missing the Operating Room
  • Donor Profile: Linda Salinas
Posted 5 years ago
May Day on Porter - Sunday, May 1, 2016
Post Date: April 22, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

Home and Garden Tour Tickets - On Sale Now!

Save the Date -May 1st, 2016 for Our 65th Annual Home Tour On Sunday, May 1st, we will celebrate the coming together of our community and embracing the diverse artistic expressions found in the homes and gardens on our 65th Annual Home Tour. Our theme this year is May Day on Porter. There will be four beautiful homes and gardens to view, each as unique as Altadena itself. The homes are rich in architectural diversity with beautiful gardens to explore and amazing older and newer architecture to enjoy. Other highlights include complimentary dessert and beverage in the Tea Garden (10:00 am to 3:00 pm); musicians playing throughout the day in many locations; shopping at fine art, jewelry, pottery, and gift vendors. Hot rods and vintage cars from the eras of the homes on tour, with even a vintage trailer, will be on display. Our Bakery will again have our wonderful homemade cakes, cookies, pies, candies and jams for purchase. We will have our famous Altadini Pub for some light refreshments including wine, beer and sandwiches. Since 1951, the Altadena Guild of Huntington Memorial Hospital, a group of volunteers passionate about helping their community, has raised over $2 million to benefit Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI). This independent, nonprofit organization seeks to improve health by improving medicine and state-of-the-art research. The Guild also funds a scholarship at Huntington Hospital and supports the hospital’s Constance G. Zahorik Appearance Center, which helps women facing breast cancer look and feel their best. To purchase tickets online, please visit: http://altadenaguild.org/buy_tickets.html Download the event flyer: http://www.altadenaguild.org/documents/HT2016Flyer.pdf
Posted 5 years ago
The 8 Activities That Have the Most Benefits for Your Brain
Post Date: April 18, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

The 8 Activities That Have the Most Benefits for Your Brain

Kate Bayless, Livestrong.com Crossword puzzles? Check. Brain-friendly foods? Got ’em. But there is another key to staying mentally sharp: exercise. Not surprisingly, exercise has been shown to be just as important for your brain as it is for your body. Read the rest of the story here: http://www.livestrong.com/article/1011885-8-activities-benefits-brain/
Posted 5 years ago
Cardiologists Refuse to Eat These Foods
Post Date: April 15, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

Cardiologists Refuse to Eat These Foods

From Huffington Post Cardiologists! They think they’re so great, with their anatomical heart models and ascetic dietary advice. But come on. Under those white coats, they’re people, too, just like you and me, right? Which means they enjoy cold hot dogs dipped in cans of chocolate frosting, washed down with rum & Coke. Read the rest of the story here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/thrillist/cardiologists-refuse-to-e_b_9680994.html
Posted 5 years ago
Recovered Data Casts Doubt On Whether Replacing Saturated Fat With Vegetable Oil Protects Against Heart Disease
Post Date: April 15, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

Recovered Data Casts Doubt On Whether Replacing Saturated Fat With Vegetable Oil Protects Against Heart Disease

By Stephanie Castillo, Medical Daily Americans have been told to eschew saturated fat for decades, in part because the American Heart Association has said consuming high amounts can increase cholesterol levels — and not the good kind. So in the late 60s, researchers conducted a trial to see if replacing saturated fats with vegetable oil rich in a healthier polyunsaturated fat, called linoleic acid, could lower levels of LDL “bad” cholesterol and reduce rates of coronary heart disease and death. All signs seemed to point to yes, but according to a new study published in BMJ, this hypothesis stands on shakier ground than people have been led to believe. Read the rest of the story here: http://www.medicaldaily.com/saturated-fat-vegetable-oil-heart-disease-diet-advice-381566
Posted 5 years ago
How researchers, Pasadena schools partnered to study traumatic brain injuries in teen athletes
Post Date: April 11, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

How researchers, Pasadena schools partnered to study traumatic brain injuries in teen athletes

By Jason Henry, San Gabriel Valley Tribune Meshia Paton wasn’t sure about her 15-year-old son playing football at Pasadena High School. At that age, the other players hit pretty hard, she told him. But now she has a little more peace of mind if her son gets hurt — she got a full scan of his brain and his heart from a program offered for free through a partnership between Pasadena Unified School District and the Huntington Medical Research Institutes. It provides something to compare against in the event that her son, De’Shawn, is injured, and it didn’t cost her anything but time, she said. Read the rest of the story here: http://www.pasadenastarnews.com/health/20160407/how-researchers-pasadena-schools-partnered-to-study-traumatic-brain-injuries-in-teen-athletes
Posted 5 years ago
8 Things You Need To Know About Inflammation And Anti-Inflammatory Diets
Post Date: March 25, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: acute inflammation
8 Things You Need To Know About Inflammation And Anti-Inflammatory Diets 2016 Mar 24 4:22 PM Wellness By Rachel Jacoby Zoldan Read the original published feature at: http://www.self.com/wellness/2016/03/8-things-you-need-to-know-about-inflammation-and-anti-inflammatory-diets/ We break down one of the biggest, vaguest buzzwords in health and wellness—so you can actually understand what everyone's always talking about. Your body can do all kinds of amazing things, including protect itself. And that’s exactly what inflammation is: one part of the complex, biological response of bodily tissues to a variety of what the body deems “harmful” stimuli, including pathogens, damaged cells or irritants. However, in recent years inflammation’s gotten a bad rap. It’s been implicated in myriad ailments, from heart attacks to cancer, Alzheimer’s to mood disorders. A proliferation of anti-inflammatory diets have made their way onto the health scene, and various clinical studies have cited concern when an inflammatory response gets out of control. So which is it—friend or foe? Here’s everything you need to know before you start freaking out over inflammation.
  1. Sometimes inflammation can be a really good thing for your body—in fact, it’s a fundamental function of your immune system.
“Think about what happens when you get a splinter. Some bacteria can get in there, it may start to feel a little bit hot, get red, and could swell up,” Andrea Loewendorf, Ph.D., an immunology research scientist at Huntington Medical Research Institutes in Pasadena, California, tells SELF. That’s an example of a great inflammatory response—your body is literally defending itself by sending immune cells to kill the bacteria or pathogenic invader. Specifically, this is what’s known as an acute inflammatory response, signs of which include redness, heat, pain, swelling, and loss of function. However, because the response is acute, it should only last for a few hours max while your body is working to repair itself. An extreme version of acute inflammation? Swelling around the brain after injury. Of course, not a great thought, but again, it’s a clear example of how inflammation is a bodily response designed to protect—not harm—our own bodies.
  1. Our bodies are always in some kind of inflammatory state.
“Inflammation is a part of our immune system,” says Loewendorf. “It’s the immune system at work.” Things like open wounds healing, swelling around broken bones and even a fever when you’ve caught a virus are all examples of the inflammatory response at its finest, making sure to repair what needs fixing, she tells SELF. Nutritionist and holistic health coach Amanda Goldfarb, R.D., of Pawley’s Island, SC, concurs. “Despite the buzz around the ‘anti-inflammatory diets,’ you can’t kill the bodily function entirely—your body is always going through some sort of inflammation,” Goldfarb tells SELF.
  1. But if our immune systems start to overreact, that’s when problems could kick in.
“The first sign of your immune system going above and beyond is allergies,” says Loewendorf. Let’s say you’re allergic to peanuts: If you eat one, your immune system overreacts causing an allergic reaction, which, depending on the sensitivity of your allergy, could even kill you, she notes. “Diseases like lupus or multiple sclerosis, both autoimmune conditions, are when the immune system is unable to differentiate between what’s dangerous and what’s not,” Loewendorf tells SELF. “When you have one of these diseases, your immune system doesn’t understand that ‘This is myself, this is me.’” While the mechanism may be clear, there are no cures for the majority of autoimmune diseases, just palliative medications to keep a condition in check. “With type I diabetes, which is an autoimmune disease, the body turns on and destroys insulin-producing cells,” says Loewendorf. “You can’t make insulin anymore. You have to inject yourself daily.” Rheumatoid arthritis is another example of an autoimmune disease, which causes painful swelling in the lining of the joints. The chronic inflammation can also affect other parts of the body, such as the lungs, nerves, and blood vessels.
  1. When you hear people talking about the dangers of inflammation, what they’re really talking about is chronic inflammation.
As opposed to acute inflammation—a response to injury or infection—chronic inflammation doesn’t have a positive role to play. It can exist, as with the conditions described above, in a constant low-level state, doing nothing helpful and possibly putting many body systems at risk. For example, if there are inflammatory cells just hanging out in your blood stream all the time, they can damage your arteries. This leads to a buildup of plaque in the artery wall, which increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. The extent of the effects of chronic inflammation is not very well understood, but it’s a hot topic in medical science as well as in the mainstream media and wellness circles.
  1. Interestingly, obesity is also considered to be a state of chronic inflammation.
There is a theory that obesity is a kind of physical manifestation of inflammation. Caroline Apovian, M.D., director of the Nutrition and Weight Management Center at Boston Medical Center and professor of medicine and pediatrics at the Boston University School of Medicine, is one of the proponents of this theory. “We realized a while back that obesity is a state of chronic inflammation,” Apovian tells SELF. She describes a cascade of bodily responses, starting with the accumulation of fat, which leads to the release of pro-inflammatory molecules and an influx of immune cells, especially macrophages, which clean up dead cells and debris. “Then, the inflammation leaks into the blood because immune cells secrete what we call cytokines into the blood, which can lead to dangerous inflammation in other tissues, like the heart and pancreas,” she says. Inflammation, in this case, is almost like a domino effect: The more fat tissues you develop, the more inflammatory responses you’ll have and more organs could be affected, Apovian adds.
  1. There are multiple ways to control inflammation (to a point).
Got a swollen ankle or a fever? These are both acute examples of inflammation that can be treated with OTC anti-inflammatories like Advil and Aleve, Loewendorf tells SELF. Ice works well to constrict blood vessels and reduce painful swelling. Acute inflammation has a purpose—and a job to do—so it’s not inherently a bad thing you want to stop, except that it can be painful, and that’s what the pain meds and ice are for. Autoimmune disorders, unfortunately, don’t serve any greater purpose, and worse, doctors are for the most part stumped about how to stop them. But each has its own treatment regimen to control symptoms.
  1. What you eat can have an effect on systemic inflammation in the body—but there isn’t a scientific consensus on “anti-inflammatory” diets.
Goldfarb says that processed carbs, anything with trans fats, red meats, and anything with lots of sugar is inflammation-inducing and could lead to more chronic issues. Therefore she urges the importance of cutting these out of your diet. (And it looks like about half of us need to heed that warning, big time: A new study published in BMJ found that over half of Americans subsist on a diet of ultra-processed foods. Yikes!) Ask Apovian about the anti-inflammatory diet and she’ll tell you “it’s just jargon.” Similarly, Goldfarb says it’s not about a specific diet plan when trying to reduce inflammation using your eating habits—it’s more about cleaning things up. “I would never tell a client, ‘I’m putting you on an anti-inflammatory diet,’” Goldfarb tells SELF, “I’d say, ‘Let’s see what we can change,’ instead.” However, if you look to Drs. Nicholas Perricone and Frank Lipman, who have both made waves in the health world recently, you’ll see they both have their own versions of anti-inflammatory diets. The idea is basically to cut out those same foods Goldfarb recommends against, while focusing on inflammation-reducing ones, such as foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids (hello, salmon), fruits and veggies, which are packed with antioxidants (let the battle over nightshade vegetables commence; some experts suggest avoiding their potentially inflammatory effects, while others tout their anti-inflammatory prowess), and a liberal use of spices. Not only do these diets purport to make weight loss easier, but they also claim to slow the aging process and prevent disease. Goldfarb can’t argue with that advice, even if she wouldn’t use the term “anti-inflammatory.” She would similarly recommend a diet rich in whole, clean foods—incorporating the use of as much fresh food as possible. “You’re going to feel better, and you’re going to lose weight. It’s a win-win,” she tells SELF.
  1. If you worry about inflammation, eating a good diet and adopting good lifestyle habits is a good start.
Whatever you call it, eating antioxidant-rich foods, plenty of omega-3s, and staying away from sugar and trans fats is a pretty inarguable strategy for good health and can help limit unnecessary inflammation that could be caused by your diet. Maintaining a healthy body weight will also keep you from experiencing undue systemic inflammation, as will not smoking and not overindulging in alcohol.
Posted 5 years ago
Announcing HMRI’s Advanced Multi-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Workshop: April 8 – 10, 2016
Post Date: March 24, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Announcing HMRI’s Advanced Multi-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy WorkshopIn 1995, HMRI hosted its very first proton spectroscopy training course as a part of GE’s Masters Course series. From 1995 to 2009, HMRI trained hundreds of radiologists, physicians, scientists, physicists and technologists how to acquire, process and interpret spectroscopy data employed in research and clinical settings. Now, after 7 years, this training returns to HMRI! This time, however, HMRI will introduce applications of multi-nuclear spectroscopy including phosphorus and carbon, as well as focusing on applications and challenges of advanced proton spectroscopy techniques. Invited experts from General Electric—along with current and former HMRI colleagues, Thao Tran, Alex Lin, PhD, and Stefan Bluml, PhD—will give presentations on clinical proton MRS in adult and pediatric populations, clinical multi-nuclear spectroscopy applications, and software and hardware requirements for MNS. There will also be hands-on sessions to demonstrate acquisition and processing methods. The former Director of HMRI’s Imaging Center, Dr. Brian Ross, MD, PhD, will give the plenary lecture: “MNS – Clinical Diagnosis & Beyond.” HMRI is proud to bring this informative and well-received workshop back in continuation of its proton spectroscopy research programs and in connection to its multi-nuclear endeavors. Please contact Thao Tran at thaotran@hmri.org to find out more and to register.  
Posted 5 years ago
Cardiovascular Effects of Marijuana
Post Date: March 8, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Shereif Rezkalla, MD, FACP, FACC, Rachel Stankowski, PhD, and Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD, FACC, Cardiovascular-Effects-of-MarijuanaPlants of the Cannabis species, commonly known as marijuana, contain numerous psychoactive components, including the primary psychoactive compound D-9-tetrahyrdocannabinol (THC).1 The World Health Organization (WHO) describes cannabis as the most widely used, cultivated, and trafficked illicit drug in the world, with an estimated 147 million people using the drug annually.2 Consistent with worldwide reports, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration estimated nearly 20 million active marijuana users in the United States in 2013, making it the most widely used illicit drug in the nation.3 Evidence of therapeutic potential for marijuana and its components has been suggested for a number of medical conditions, including cachexia, cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, muscle spasm, seizures, severe nausea, severe or chronic pain, and sleep disorders,1 though lack of scientific evidence regarding safety and efficacy has prohibited endorsement by the US Food and Drug Administration for any therapeutic use. Read the complete article on Cardiovascular Effects of Marijuana Listen to the AM640 KFI radio clip about marijuana and heart problems (below): [audio mp3="http://hmri.org/newsite/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/marijuana-and-heart-problems-audio-clip.mp3"][/audio]
Posted 5 years ago
HMRI Insights Newsletter - Winter 2016
Post Date: March 7, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: HMRI Newsletters
Inside this issue: Click here to download our Newsletter in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. You will need the free Acrobat Reader software to read or print these documents.
  • Forward: The Campaign for HMRI
  • Man For All Reasons: Dave Strickland
  • Editorial Boards: Why We Serve
  • A Gift For Science, A Gift For Eternity
  • Medical Student Patrick Chang Speaks About His Research with Myron Tong in San Francisco
  • Donor Profile: Francine Katz
  • Leading the Campaign to Move HMRI Forward - Meet the Campaign Leadership
Posted 5 years ago
Breakthroughs in the Fight Against Heart Disease
Post Date: February 26, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Read More at: http://www.lifescript.com/health/centers/heart_health/articles/breakthroughs_in_the_fight_against_heart_disease.aspx?p=1
Posted 5 years ago
Intrinsic Frequency Method: From Fluid Mechanics To A Novel Point-of-care Disease Diagnosis
Post Date: February 22, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Read More at: http://www.buffalo.edu/calendar/calendar?action=describe&which=C0388030-D710-11E5-ADBC-F393BF1F66FE
Posted 5 years ago
Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease
Post Date: February 10, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Read More at: http://www.urotoday.com/recent-abstracts/men-s-health/erectile-dysfunction/86338-testosterone-and-cardiovascular-disease.html/
Posted 5 years ago
Dr. Michael Harrington and Dr. Alfred Fonteh publish two articles
Post Date: January 28, 2016   Author: jameskingman   Category: Events & News
Dr. Michael Harrington and Dr. Alfred Fonteh recently published two articles: "White Matter Lipids as a Ketogenic Fuel Supply in Aging Female Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease" http://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(15)30192-4/abstract "Amniotic Fluid Levels of Phospholipase A2 in Fetal Rats with Retinoic Acid Induced Myelomeningocele: The Potential 'Second Hit' in Neurologic Damage" http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26513600
Posted 5 years ago
Chang Donates $100K to HMRI - San Marino Tribune Article
Post Date: January 15, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Read More at: http://sanmarinotribune.com/chang-donates-100k-to-hmri/
Posted 5 years ago
New $29 million Pasadena medical research center to open in 2017
Post Date: January 11, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Read More at: http://www.pasadenastarnews.com/business/20160111/new-29-million-pasadena-medical-research-center-to-open-in-2017
Posted 5 years ago
Chang Donates $100K to HMRI - San Marino Tribune (PDF)
Post Date: January 8, 2016   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Read More at: http://sanmarinotribune.com/files/2016/01/SMT-010816.pdf

2015

Posted 5 years ago
Is It Alzheimer's Or Normal Signs of Aging?
Post Date: November 30, 2015   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Read More at: https://www.getold.com/is-it-alzheimers-or-normal-signs-of-aging
Posted 5 years ago
Huntington Medical Research Institutes Celebrates Groundbreaking on State-of-the-Art Laboratory Building in Pasadena
Posted 5 years ago
HMRI Breaks Ground for New Biomedical Research Building
Post Date: November 20, 2015   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Read More at: http://www.thepasadenalifestyle.com/hmri-breaks-ground/
Posted 5 years ago
Huntington Medical Research Institutes to break ground on Pasadena research facility - San Gabriel Valley Tribune
Post Date: November 19, 2015   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Read More at: http://www.sgvtribune.com/business/20151118/huntington-medical-research-institutes-to-break-ground-on-pasadena-research-facility
Posted 5 years ago
Huntington Medical Research Institutes to break ground on Pasadena research facility - Whittier Daily News
Post Date: November 19, 2015   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Read More: http://www.whittierdailynews.com/business/20151118/huntington-medical-research-institutes-to-break-ground-on-pasadena-research-facility
Posted 5 years ago
Huntington Medical Research Institutes to break ground on Pasadena research facility - Pasadena Star News
Post Date: November 19, 2015   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Read More: http://www.pasadenastarnews.com/business/20151118/huntington-medical-research-institutes-to-break-ground-on-pasadena-research-facility
Posted 6 years ago
HMRI Insights Newsletter - Summer 2015
Post Date: September 21, 2015   Author: jameskingman   Category: HMRI Newsletters
Inside this issue: Click here to download our Newsletter in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. You will need the free Acrobat Reader software to read or print these documents.
  • New Mission Drives HMRI Forward
  • HMRI Installs $3 Million High Tech Magnet
  • Community Leaders Rally in Support of HMRI Biomedical Research Building
  • Introducing Orest Boyko MD, PhD and Andrea Loewendorf PhD
  • Dr. Susan Kane Joins the HMRI Board
  • HMRI Website Gets a Facelift
  • HMRI Lecture Series Hosts Weekly Talks
  • HMRI Expands Research Program for Undergraduate and Graduate Students
  • 64th Annual Home Tour
  • Brain Day Brings the Community to HMRI
Posted 6 years ago
Dr. Robert A. Kloner Quoted in The Good Life article
Post Date: September 15, 2015   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

Before you go out and swap your breath mints for an aspirin, it is important to know that the recent recommendation by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) that has been making the rounds abuzz isn't as simple as the headlines make it seem. Dr. Robert A. Kloner, director of cardiovascular research and vice president of translation at the Huntington Medical Research Institutes was quoted as saying, "It's very important to point out [the USPSTF is] not saying everyone should be on aspirin ...They're saying people ages 50 to 59, who have an increased risk of heart disease, should take a daily low-dose aspirin. So you're looking at a certain age group, first of all." Taking Aspirin, even in low doses may not be suitable for everyone, and in some cases in can do more harm than good. "Some people are allergic to it, and… some people are prone to bleed," Dr. Kloner explains. "And so if you have a history of bleeding ulcers or other bleeding problems, then you are probably not going to be a candidate for aspirin." For more information about Dr. Robert A. Kloner, view his bio, or to read the complete story, please visit the link below: http://www.drozthegoodlife.com/health-articles/health-conditions/news/a510/daily-aspirin-uspstf-recommendation-not-universal/ All Credit: Amy Capetta, DR. OZ - The Good Life. "Don't Make Aspirin Part of Your Daily Routine Just Yet" September 2015.

Posted 6 years ago
L.A. Business Journal - Locking Up Cells
Post Date: August 26, 2015   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Awash in frozen packs of umbilical cord blood, StemCyte Inc. needed to move. That’s because of increasing demand from parents to store their babies’ stem cell-rich cord blood for a range of future therapies, some of which are only now being studied and developed. Now, having taken root earlier this year in a 48,000-square-foot headquarters building in Baldwin Park, the company has room for more than 150 of the massive tanks it needs three times the capacity of its old home – each holding more than a thousand frozen packs of cord blood. Blood is big business, and demand for cord blood in particular has been growing. To read the complete story, please visit the link included below: http://hmri.org/newsite/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/StemCell-LABJ1.pdf All Credit: Marni Usheroff, L.A. Business Journal. "Locking Up Cells" August 2015. PDF/Print.
Posted 6 years ago
U.S. News & World Report: Preteen Football Tied to Brain Changes in Retired NFL Players: Study
Post Date: August 25, 2015   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Playing tackle football before the age of 12 may be linked to brain changes seen in pro football players who developed memory and thinking problems later in life, new research suggests. "It makes sense that children, whose brains are rapidly developing, should not be hitting their heads over and over again," said lead author Julie Stamm, who conducted the study as part of her doctoral dissertation at Boston University's Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy. To read the complete story, please visit the link included below: http://health.usnews.com/health-news/articles/2015/08/21/preteen-football-tied-to-brain-changes-in-retired-nfl-players-study All Credit: U.S. News & World Report, LLP. "Preteen Football Tied to Brain Changes in Retired NFL Players: Study" U.S News & World Report HealthDay August 2015. Web.
Posted 6 years ago
Fox News Article: The Hidden Dangers of Taking Common Painkillers
Post Date: August 19, 2015   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Dr. Myron Tong of the Huntington Medical Research Institutes was recently interviewed regarding the hidden dangers of taking common painkillers in a story reported on Fox News' website.  The story which was published on August 15th, 2015 points out that: "Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, commonly referred to as NSAIDs, are used to alleviate fever symptoms and reduce pain. Most people who take over-the-counter NSAIDs use them to ease the occasional headache or muscle pain. But they also provide quick relief for an estimated 52 million Americans— mostly older adults— with arthritis. In these cases, prescription-strength NSAIDs drastically improve quality of life with few noticeable side effects." Dr. Tong was quoted as saying, "These are some of the most popular drugs in the world ... And as the American population ages, usage will probably increase too." According to the report, research shows that the regular use of the drugs increases the long-term risk of "heart attack, stroke, liver damage and ulcers." To read the complete story, please visit the link included below: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2015/08/15/hidden-dangers-taking-common-painkillers/ All Credit: Fox News. "The hidden dangers of taking common painkillers" Fox News Health August 2015. Web.
Posted 6 years ago
New Implant Therapy Offered to Treat Chronic Involuntary Bowel Incontinence
Post Date: April 15, 2015   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Media Releases
Dr. Howard Kaufman, director of HMRI’s Colorectal Research Program, is one of the initial 16 doctors across the nation approved to perform the new InterStim® bowel control therapy, offered by Medtronic, Inc., of Minneapolis, MN. Dr. Kaufman was a co-investigator in a multinational multicenter clinical study into whether the InterStim Therapy for urinary incontinence, for which Medtronic won FDA approval in 1997, could be successfully applied to bowel incontinence. “The study in which Dr. Kaufman participated to evaluate the Medtronic InterStim system as a remedy for bowel incontinence fits well with the history of HMRI’s Neural Engineering Program for developing and evaluating clinical applications of nerve stimulations,” said Dr. Douglas McCreery, Neural Engineering director. The HMRI Neural Engineering researchers have a long history of developing electrodes for activating nerves. The Huntington Helix array was licensed to Cyberonics, Inc. and subsequently has been implanted into more than 40,000 persons with epilepsy and with depression. Other version of our nerve electrodes have been evaluated by clinicians at the Cleveland Clinic for treating swallowing difficulties following cerebral stroke and at Washington University in St. Louis for treating urge incontinence.   This latest InterStim study’s success earned FDA approval in March. Chronic involuntary loss of bowel control is a humiliating, life-changing condition. According to a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded study, more than 18 million Americans have fecal incontinence. Among older persons, the infirmity is the single most frequent factor for admittance to nursing homes because families have difficulty dealing with its demands. Caused by a variety of factors, it is most common among adults, predominately women who experience nerve and muscular trauma in the anus, rectum, and pelvic floor during childbirth. Eileen Brophy Williams was Dr. Kaufman’s first patient to participate in the clinical study. The former Newport Beach resident’s bowel incontinence resulted from an unsuccessful sphincteroplasty repair of an episiotomy following the birth of her first child 13 years ago. Her colorectal surgeon, Dr. Babak Rad, heard of the clinical study and referred her to Dr. Kaufman. She thought her incontinence was due to digestion problems because she was a new mother nervous about her child or possibly related to an old back injury. She simply had no feeling or sensation when she had incontinent episodes that occurred almost every day. Her life was severely limited to her household, and she wasn’t able to participate in her children’s school projects and so much more. Brophy Williams was a perfect candidate for the clinical trial because she had gone through various other treatment options. Dr. Kaufman explained those therapies included bowel habit modification through diet (increasing fiber, prescribing anti-diarrheal medications, etc.), sphincter muscle surgery, as well as biofeedback and physical therapy. InterStim Therapy is the only bowel control treatment option that allows patients and physicians to determine probable success of the therapy through a test stimulation procedure prior to committing to long-term therapy. Brophy Williams went through InterStim’s two-step outpatient implant process in March 2005. During the first visit, an electrode connects sacral nerves to an external test stimulator that can be adjusted for the correct amperage to stimulate nerves. “Patients will then walk around with the InterStim on a belt that’s programmed with the help of a Medtronic technician,” Dr. Kaufman explained. “If they pass the test of a reduction of incontinence of more than 50 percent for two weeks, they will qualify for a permanent implant.” Brophy Williams said that during those two weeks, she experienced the sensation for a bowel movement that she hadn’t experienced in years. She became a candidate for permanent implant. The InterStim Therapy uses an implantable system consisting of a thin wire lead and a neurostimulator, or pacemaker-like device about the size of a quarter, to stimulate the sacral nerve to control bowel function. The neurostimulator is implanted on the upper part of the buttock above the pelvis. “I was involved with the industry and thought this would be a technology to offer patients who had been unsuccessful with available therapies,” Dr. Kaufman said. “I was fortunate to have the patient population and the relationship already with Medtronic and other companies so we could stratify patients based on their anatomy and physiology.” “We implanted the device in 120 patients who met the inclusion criteria with various degrees of fecal incontinence,” Dr. Kaufman said. The study ran from 2002-2008, and “showed that at 12 months, 83 percent achieved ‘therapeutic’ success (with 41 percent of those subjects reaching 100 percent continence). While our paper reported on sustained success through two years, most patients have had continued success through their continued length of follow-up.” Additionally incontinent episodes decreased from a mean of 9.4 per week to 1.9/week at 12 months and 2.9/week at two years. “When I had this surgery within two weeks time, I was able to get involved with my kids in school,” Brophy Williams said. “It gave me back my life. I had stopped myself from having a life.” “There are women who are going through this who don’t even know they have this. I had no idea I was as injured as I was. I was told there wasn’t any help for me.” “Dr. Rad and Dr. Kaufman never gave up on me,” she recalled. “I owe them my life and my life with my kids and family.” Now, Dr. Kaufman is the first physician authorized to perform the InterStim implant for patients in the Southwest, including Southern California, Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico. After he has completed 20 implants, Dr. Kaufman will train other colorectal surgeons in the two-step, out-patient procedure. In an unrelated project funded by the National Institutes of Health, HMRI's Neural Engineering Program researchers have been working to develop a neuroprosthetic device to artificially control urination for spinal cord injured patients. HMRI NEP scientists are also studying mechanisms of stroke-induced overactive bladder and a possible treatment by intraspinal microstimulation.
Posted 6 years ago
HMRInsights Newsletter - Spring 2015
Post Date: April 10, 2015   Author: adminhmri321   Category: HMRI Newsletters
Click here to download our Newsletter in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. You will need the free Acrobat Reader software to read or print these documents. Inside this issue:
  • 2015 Brings Leadership Change to HMRI
  • New HMRI Research Building Project Announced
  • Cardiovascular Research Returns to HMRI with Recruitment of a World-Class Research Team
  • Tips from Dr. Kloner to Maintain A Healthy Heart
  • On the Tee for Research with HMRI
  • HMRI welcomes new board members
  • Pasadena Unified Partners with HMRI to Save Lives of Student Athletes
 
Posted 6 years ago
Huntington Hospital Cancer Center Receives National Outstanding Achievement Award
Post Date: April 3, 2015   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

Award recognizes cancer programs that achieve excellence in providing highest quality care to cancer patients

PASADENA, Calif., April 2, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Huntington Memorial Hospital Cancer Center (HHCC) was recently presented with the 2014 Outstanding Achievement Award by the Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons (ACS). HHCC is one of a select group of only 75 U.S. health care facilities with accredited cancer programs to receive this national honor for surveys performed last year. The award acknowledges cancer programs that achieve excellence in providing quality care to cancer patients. "A cancer diagnosis is among one of the most challenging experiences a patient can face," said Howard Kaufman, MD, medical director of HHCC. "This accreditation, in combination with the Outstanding Achievement Award, validates the exceptional care our team of physicians and nurses provides to help improve the quality of life for our patients during this difficult time." The purpose of the award is to raise awareness about the importance of providing quality cancer care at health care institutions throughout the U.S. Furthermore, it provides a mechanism for HHCC to share its commendation-winning practices with other institutions. It is intended to:
  • Motivate other cancer programs to work toward improving their level of care.
  • Facilitate dialogue between award recipients and healthcare professionals at other cancer facilities for the purpose of sharing best practices.
  • Encourage honorees to serve as quality-care resources to other cancer programs.
  • Educate cancer patients on available quality-care options.
"At Huntington Hospital, we are committed to providing the best possible cancer care to the communities we serve," said Stephen A. Ralph, hospital president and CEO. "The cancer center provides the highest standard of care and technology, proving that patients do not need to travel far to receive the best cancer treatment available." HHCC cancer program was evaluated on 34 program standards categorized within four cancer program activity areas: cancer committee leadership, cancer data management, clinical services, and quality improvement. The cancer program was further evaluated on seven commendation standards. All award recipients must have received commendation ratings in all seven commendation standards, in addition to receiving a compliance rating for each of the 27 other standards. For a list of all cancer programs in the U.S. that received the award in 2014 visit: https://www.facs.org/quality-programs/cancer/accredited/about/outstanding/2014. About the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer Established in 1922 by the ACS, the CoC is a consortium of professional organizations dedicated to improving patient outcomes and quality of life for cancer patients through standard-setting, prevention, research, education and the monitoring of comprehensive quality care.  The CoC provides the public with information on the resources, services and cancer treatment experience for each CoC-accredited cancer program. The CoC's accreditation program encourages hospitals, treatment centers, and other facilities to improve their quality of patient care through various cancer-related programs. For more information on the CoC, visit:www.facs.org/cancer/index.html (.) About Huntington Hospital Huntington Hospital, www.HuntingtonHospital.com, is a 625-bed not-for-profit hospital located in Pasadena, California. It has been ranked nationally by U.S. News and World Report in two specialties and was named among the top hospitals in California. The hospital is on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/HuntingtonMemorialHospital and on Twitter at @HuntingtonNews. SOURCE Huntington Memorial Hospital RELATED LINKS http://www.HuntingtonHospital.com
Posted 6 years ago
Dr. Robert Kloner Interviewed by Tim Conway Jr. on KFI-AM
Post Date: January 29, 2015   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Audio
Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD, Director of the HMRI Cardiovascular Research Institute was recently interviewed by Tim Conway Jr. on the Tim Conway Jr. Show on KFI-AM.  Dr. Kloner was interested about the increase of heart attacks during the Superbowl.

2014

Posted 6 years ago
HMRInsights Newsletter - Fall 2014
Post Date: November 5, 2014   Author: adminhmri321   Category: HMRI Newsletters
Click here to download our Newsletter in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. You will need the free Acrobat Reader software to read or print these documents. Inside this issue:
  • HMRI Receives Major Funding for Alzheimer's Research;
  • Oxygen:  More is Not Necessarily Better;
  • Breakthrough HMRI Alzheimer's Study Published;
  • HMRI Launches Seed Grant Program;
  • Meet HMRI Researcher Cherise Charleswell;
  • GlaxoSmithKline Partners with HMRI in Cutting-Edge Bioelectronic Research;
  • Introducing the HMRI Speakers Bureau & Speakers Series;
  • HMRI Summer Student Research Program Continues Its Tradition of Excellence;
  • Dr. Lawrence W. Jones Retires.
 
Posted 7 years ago
HMRI Lecture Series
Post Date: October 13, 2014   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
As a benefit to our community, HMRI hosts weekly lectures by leading scientists and doctors.  For specific details on each lecture, or if you’d like to receive weekly e-mail alerts, please contact Jim Kingman at kingmanj@hmri.org.  You can also get news bulletins by following us on any of these social media sites:
Posted 7 years ago
HMRI Collaborates with Pasadena Unified to Offer Cardiac and Brain MR Screenings for Student Athletes
Post Date: October 5, 2014   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News

The Magnetic Resonance Laboratory is offering complimentary cardiac and brain screening exams for student athletes of the Pasadena Unified School District (PUSD). We are currently working with Ann Rector, PUSD Health Coordinator, to recruit students who are actively involved in sports. These prevention-oriented MR scans will be able to detect life-threatening cardiac anomalies that can cause sudden cardiac death, as well as assess and monitor brain injuries, resulting from sports-related incidents, which may cause long-term physical, neurocognitive, and behavioral deficits. Brain and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging exams are non-invasive, clinical routine procedures that allow for visualization of anatomy and functional assessments. The cardiac exam can detect congenital heart conditions and cardiomyopathies, which can prove to be life-threatening to those who physically exert themselves through sports. Students enrolled in the cardiac program will only need to have one cardiac screening exam performed, while the brain exam will be conducted once at the beginning of the season and subsequent exams will be performed if a student suffers any injuries during the season to evaluate changes due to trauma. These prevention-oriented research initiatives are of particular importance to the students of PUSD, who are largely underserved with 67% of students identified as low-income; and thus likely to have minimal access to sufficient health care, including specialized procedures such as magnetic resonance imaging. We are currently recruiting student athletes between the ages of 10-18 for either or both exams. For more information or to participate, please contact Darlene Royal at 626-397-5840 or email us at MagRes.HMRI@gmail.com.  

Posted 7 years ago
Breakthrough HMRI Alzheimer's Study Published - Reveals Possible Early Diagnosis, Potential Treatment
Post Date: July 18, 2014   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
PASADENA, CA -  A groundbreaking study on Alzheimer’s Disease, authored by HMRI Senior Biochemist Dr. Alfred Fonteh, and his colleagues from HMRI’s Molecular Neurology Program, has just been published in PLOS ONE, a leading scientific peer-reviewed journal. Entitled Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Fatty Acid Levels Differ between Supernatant Fluid and Brain-Derived Nanoparticle Fractions, and Are Altered in Alzheimer’s Disease, the study shows that the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer’s Disease may contain diagnostic information before they have memory loss. The spinal fluid analysis also points to possible new avenues of therapy.  The 3-year study found significant differences in fatty acids in cerebrospinal fluid – the fluid that bathes the brain and spinal cord – between Alzheimer’s and cognitively healthy patients.  In particular, Omega-3 fatty acid levels were found to be considerably reduced in Alzheimer’s patients. “We measured a vast number of lipid compounds in the cerebrospinal fluid and found a lot of changes, especially in Omega-3 fatty acids and also in the mono-unsaturated fatty acids,” said Dr. Alfred Fonteh, HMRI Senior Biochemist, and the lead researcher on the study.  “These (Omega-3’s) are the kind of fatty acids that you often find in a Mediterranean diet.” Dr. Fonteh noted that in earlier studies people in countries with high-fish diets – foods particularly rich in Omega-3 fatty acids  – were found to have better memory function and tend not to have as high an incidence of Alzheimer’s disease.  These data formed part of the hypothesis that led to his study.  In addition, it was known from earlier studies of Alzheimer’s disease that the brain – which contains abundant fatty acids – shrinks considerably in Alzheimer’s patients. This was the first study of its kind to be conducted on live human subjects.  “For a long time people have done animal studies that found that if you provide a certain amount of Omega-3 fatty acids to rats, it prevents memory loss,” Dr. Fonteh continued.  “But no one has ever studied humans to discover levels of Omega-3 fatty acids in the brain, or whether they’re actually depleted or have any significance in disease.”  By looking in cerebrospinal fluid, the researchers have a more direct read-out of changes in the brain, rather than looking in blood where molecular changes originating from the brain are mixed together with changes from all the other organs. The findings of the study raise new questions, to explore new treatment options.  The changes in fatty acids within cerebrospinal fluid could be used as markers to characterize the stage of Alzheimer’s disease and perhaps to monitor response to therapies.  Intriguingly, looking at restoration of fatty acids may be an approach to therapy, and the HMRI group will be addressing the results of this study with further research in the same patients, new study participants, in parallel with laboratory studies. To read the study in its entirety, visit http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0100519 ABOUT DR. ALFRED FONTEH Dr. Alfred Fonteh holds a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of London, and completed postdoctoral studies at Johns Hopkins University Asthma and Allergy Center.  Prior to coming to HMRI, he held positions of Research Associate, Instructor of Medicine and Assistant Professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.  Dr. Fonteh has been with HMRI for 13 years, and now holds the position of Senior Biochemist.  His research path focuses on lipid signaling pathways to discover therapeutic targets of neurological disorders, including migraine. ABOUT PLOS ONE PLOS ONE (eISSN-1932-6203) is an international, peer-reviewed, open-access, online publication. PLOS ONE welcomes reports on primary research from any scientific discipline. It provides:
  • Open-access—freely accessible online, authors retain copyright
  • Fast publication times
  • Peer review by expert, practicing researchers
  • Post-publication tools to indicate quality and impact
  • Community-based dialogue on articles
  • Worldwide media coverage
PLOS ONE is published by PLOS, a nonprofit organization.
Posted 7 years ago
2013 HMRI Publications
Post Date: May 20, 2014   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Publications

For a PDF copy of this publications list, please click here.

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Kanamori, K. and B. D. Ross (2013). "Electrographic seizures are significantly reduced by in vivo inhibition of neuronal uptake of extracellular glutamine in rat hippocampus." Epilepsy Res107(1-2): 20-36.

Harrington, M. G., J. Chiang, J. M. Pogoda, M. Gomez, K. Thomas, S. D. Marion, K. J. Miller, P. Siddarth, X. Yi, F. Zhou, S. Lee, X. Arakaki, R. P. Cowan, T. Tran, C. Charleswell, B. D. Ross and A. N. Fonteh (2013). "Executive function changes before memory in preclinical Alzheimer's pathology: a prospective, cross-sectional, case control study." PLoS One8(11): e79378.

Ross, B. D. (2013). "High-field MRS in clinical drug development." Expert Opin Drug Discov8(7): 849-863.

Ross, B. D. (2013). Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Brain. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy:Tools for Neuroscience Research and Emerging Clinical Applications. C. Stagg & D. Rothman (eds.), Chap. 4.3:331-350. Oxford, UK: Elsevier.

Ackerman, J. J. H. (2013). "Hyperpolarized silicon particles show high potential for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging." Nat Nanotechnol8: 313-315.

Sailasuta, N., K. C. Harris, T. T. Tran, O. Abulseoud and B. D. Ross (2013). "Impact of fasting on human brain acid-base homeostasis using natural abundance (13) C and (31) P MRS." J Magn Reson Imaging39(2): 398-401.

Cassidy, M. C., H. R. Chan, B. D. Ross, P. K. Bhattacharya and C. M. Marcus (2013). "In vivo magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized silicon particles." Nat Nanotechnol8(5): 363-368.

Liang, E., P. Garzone, J. M. Cedarbaum, M. Koller, T. Tran, V. Xu, B. D. Ross, S. S. Jhee, L. Ereshefsky, A. Pastrak and S. Abushakra (2013). "Pharmacokinetic profile of orally administered Scyllo-Inositol (Elnd005) in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and brain, and corresponding effect on amyloid-beta in healthy subjects." Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development2(2): 186-194.

Lin, A. P. and B. D. Ross (2013). "Recent progress in clinical magnetic resonance spectroscopy." Encyclopedia of Magnetic Resonance (eMagRes).2(47-54).

Sancheti, H., K. Kanamori, I. Patil, R. Diaz Brinton, B. D. Ross and E. Cadenas (2014). "Reversal of metabolic deficits by lipoic acid in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: a 13C NMR study." J Cereb Blood Flow Metab34(2): 288-296.

Posters/ Abstracts

Tran, T. C. Charleswell, N. O’dell, J. Liu, M. Miller, M. Lindsey and B. D. Ross (2013). Impact of short-term administration of oral Minocycline, a repurposed anti-neuroinflammatory agent, on MR and neuropsychological biomarkers of MCI and AD. Proceedings of  21st Annual Meeting of International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine., Session: Advance Imaging of Dementia. Program #2888.

 

Liver

Tong, M. J., Kowdley, K. V. Pan, C. K. Q. Hu, T. T. Chang, K. H. Han, S. K. Yoon, Z. D. Goodman, S. Beebe, U. Iloeje and H. Tang (2013). "Improvement in liver histology among Asian patients with chronic hepatitis B after long-term treatment with entecavir." Liver Int33(4): 650-651.

Saab, S., D. Lalezari, P. Pruthi, T. Alper and M. J. Tong (2013). "The impact of obesity on patient survival in liver transplant recipients: a meta-analysis." Liver Int.

 

Molecular Neurology

Fonteh, A. N., J. Chiang, M. Cipolla, J. Hale, F. Diallo, A. Chirino, X. Arakaki and M. G. Harrington (2013). "Alterations in cerebrospinal fluid glycerophospholipids and phospholipase A2 activity in Alzheimer's disease." J Lipid Res54(10): 2884-2897.

Harrington, M. G., J. Chiang, J. M. Pogoda, M. Gomez, K. Thomas, S. D. Marion, K. J. Miller, P. Siddarth, X. Yi, F. Zhou, S. Lee, X. Arakaki, R. P. Cowan, T. Tran, C. Charleswell, B. D. Ross and A. N. Fonteh (2013). "Executive function changes before memory in preclinical Alzheimer's pathology: a prospective, cross-sectional, case control study." PLoS One8(11): e79378.

Arakaki, X., P. McCleary, M. Techy, J. Chiang, L. Kuo, A. N. Fonteh, B. Armstrong, D. Levy and M. G. Harrington (2013). "Na,K-ATPase alpha isoforms at the blood-cerebrospinal fluid-trigeminal nerve and blood-retina interfaces in the rat." Fluids Barriers CNS10(1): 14.

Fonteh, A. N., J. M. Pogoda, R. Chung, R. P. Cowan and M. G. Harrington (2013). "Phospholipase C activity increases in cerebrospinal fluid from migraineurs in proportion to the number of comorbid conditions: a case-control study." J Headache Pain14: 60.

 

Molecular Pathology

Singer, E., J. Linehan, G. Babilonia, S. A. Imam, D. Smith, S. Loera, T. Wilson and S. Smith (2013). "Stromal response to prostate cancer: nanotechnology-based detection of thioredoxin-interacting protein partners distinguishes prostate cancer associated stroma from that of benign prostatic hyperplasia." PLoS One8(6): e60562.

 

Neural Engineering

Journal Papers

Duong, H. and M. Han (2013). "A multispectral LED array for the reduction of background autofluorescence in brain tissue." J Neurosci Methods220(1): 46-54.

Kim, B. J., J. T. Kuo, S. A. Hara, C. D. Lee, L. Yu, C. A. Gutierrez, T. Q. Hoang, V. Pikov and E. Meng (2013). "3D Parylene sheath neural probe for chronic recordings." J Neural Eng10(4): 045002.

McCreery DB, Han M, Pikov V, Yadav K, Pannu S (2013) Encoding of the amplitude modulation of pulsatile electrical stimulation in the feline cochlear nucleus by neurons in the inferior colliculus: effects of stimulus pulse rate. J Neural Eng 10(5): 056010.

Rohan, J. G., Y. R. Citron, A. C. Durrell, L. E. Cheruzel, H. B. Gray, R. H. Grubbs, M. Humayun, K. L. Engisch, V. Pikov and R. H. Chow (2013). "Light-triggered modulation of cellular electrical activity by ruthenium diimine nanoswitches." ACS Chem Neurosci4(4): 585-593.

Conference Papers

Kuo, J. T. W., B. J. Kim, S. A. Hara, C. D. Lee, L. Yu, C. A. Gutierrez, T. Q. Hoang, V. Pikov and E. Meng (2013). 3D Parylene sheath probes for reliable, long-term neuroprosthetic recordings. IEEE 26th Int Conf MEMS: 1073-1076.

Romanenko, S., P. H. Siegel, D. A. Wagenaar and V. Pikov (2013). Comparison of the effects of millimeter wave irradiation, general bath heating, and localized heating on neuronal activity in the leech ganglion. . Proc SPIE: 8585: 85850N.

Kim, B. J., S. A. Hara, B. Chen, J. T. W. Kuo, C. D. Lee, C. A. Gutierrez, T. Hoang, M. Gupta, V. Pikov and E. Meng (2013). Evaluation of post-fabrication thermoforming process for intracortical Parylene sheath electrode. IEEE EMBS Neural Engineering Conference. San Diego, CA.

Romanenko, S., P. H. Siegel and V. Pikov (2013). Microdosimetry and physiological effects of millimeter wave irradiation in isolated neural ganglion preparation. Proc MSMW: 512-516.

Hara, S. A., B. J. Kim, J. T. W. Kuo, C. D. Lee, T. Q. Hoang, V. Pikov and E. Meng (2013). Perforated 2×2 Parylene sheath electrode array for chronic intracortical recording. IEEE EMBS Neural Engineering Conference. San Diego, CA.

2013

Posted 8 years ago
HMRI 2012 Publications
Post Date: June 5, 2013   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Publications
In Vitro Systems/Tissue Engineering Ingram M, Nakeff A, Techy G, Nolan JP, Imam SA and Ward BR. Tumor histoids: Scalable Synthesis of Realistic Human “Minitumor” for High Throughput Screening Poster Presented at the 27th Congress of the International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry in Lipzig, Germany, May 21-25, 2012. Mehta G, Hsiao AY, Ingram M,  Luker GD and Takayama S. (2012). "Opportunities and challenges for use of tumor spheroids as models to test drug delivery and efficacy." J Control Release 164(2): 192-204. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Lin AP1,2,3§, Bruno P4, Tran T2 ,Wen H3, Ross BD2. Age-Related Changes in Common Carotid artery Mean Wall Thickness and Cyclic Strain using MRI 1Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Ca, USA 2Huntington Medical Research Institutes, Pasadena, CA. USA 3National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 4University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA §Corresponding author. Lin AP, Non-Invasive Imaging of Carotid Arterial Strain Using Displacement Encoded MRI Thesis In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 2009. Manuscripts Published Zacharias NM, Chan HR, Sailasuta N, Ross BD, Bhattacharya P. Real-time molecular imaging of tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism in Vivo by hyperpolarized 1-13C diethyl-succinate. Journal of The American Chemical Society (JACS). 2012; 134: 934-943. (NCT01463384). Lin AP, Ross BD. Recent progress in clinical magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Encyclopedia of Magnetic Resonance (EMR). 2012; 1: 1-8. Lin AP, Liao HJ, Merugumala SK, Prabhu SP, Meehan WP, Ross BD. Metabolic imaging of mild traumatic brain injury. Brain Imaging Behavior. 2012; 6:208-223. Lingwood MD, Siaw TA, Sailasuta N, Abulseoud OA, Chan HR, Ross BD, Bhattacharya P, Han S. Hyperpolarized water as an MRI contrast agent: feasibility of In vivo imaging in a rat model. Radiology. Nov 2012; 265(2):418-425. In Press Cassidy, MC, Chan HR, Ross BD, Bhattacharya PK, Marcus CM. Supplementary information: In-vivo magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized silicon particles. Nature. In Press 2012. Submitted Tran TT, Sailasuta N, Powell DK, Van Eldik LJ, Smith CD, Ross, BD. A standardized and reproducible protocol for proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human brain. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI). 2012. Harris K, Tran T, Abulseoud O, Ross BD. Defining the impact of fasting on human brain acid-base homeostasis using natural abundance 13C and 31P MRS. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. Sept 2012. Lin A, Tran T, Bluml S, Merugumala S, Hui-jun L, Ross BD. Guidelines for acquiring and reporting clinical neurospectroscopy. Seminars in Neurology. Oct 2012. Lin A, Ramadan S, Stern RA, Box H, Nowinski C, Ross BD, Mountford C. Changes in neurochemistry of athletes with repetitive head injury. Neuroimage. 2013. Kanamori K and Ross BD.  Electrographic seizures are significantly reduced by in vivo inhibition of neuronal uptake of extracellular glutamine in rat hippocampus.  Journal of Neuroscience Book Chapters Published Kanamori K, Ross BD, Choi In-Young, Gruetter, Rold (Eds.). Nitrogen metabolism In Vivo, Chapter 35. (Neural Metabolism In Vivo4: Advances In Neurobiology). 2012; 1005-1026. Springer. Submitted Ross BD. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Neuroscientists and Clinicians: Hyperpolarized MR imaging and spectroscopy of the brain. Rothman & Stagg (Eds). 2012. Abstracts Accepted Tran T, Liu J,  Sailasuta N, Ross BD.  Is your brain really necessary: Combined quantitative MRI and quantitative MRS may improve early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.  American Society of Neuroimaging. #P27. 2012. Charleswell C, Tran T, Liu J, Sailasuta N, Ross BD. Prevention of Alzheimer’s disease through drug intervention: Design of quantitative biomarker monitoring. American Public Health Association. #271196. 2012. Tran T, Liu J. Employing combined quantitative MRI and MRS markers to distinguish mild cognitive impairment. International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. #4442. 2012. Submitted Tran T, Liu J, Sailasuta J, Ross BD. Combined quantitative MRI and quantitative MRS may improve early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. American Academy of Neurology. 2012. Tran T, Ross BD. Smarter clinical design for drug discovery in MCI and AD. American Academy of Neurology. 2012. Manuscript Submission Withheld Lin, A, Ross BD, Tran T, Liu J, Shic F. Combining quantitative MRI with quantitative MRS for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. (Withheld pending patent consideration) Molecular Neurology Arakaki X, McCleary P, Techy M, Kuo L, Fonteh AN, Armstrong B, Levy D, Harrington MG Na+, K+, ATPase isoforms at the blood-cerebrospinal fluid-trigeminal nerve and blood-retina interfaces in the rat.  2012, Fluids and barriers of the CNS: under review. Harrington MG, Schepkin V. Sodium MRI reveals in vivo protection from central sensitization by Na+, K+, ATPase inhibition  (Huntington Medical Research Institutes);  (FSU, NHMFL).  National High Magnetic field Laboratory 2012 Research Report Schepkin VD, Harrington MG,  Changes in blood oxygenation in a rat migraine model (NHMFL/FSU, Tallahassee FL);  (Huntington Medical Research Institutes) National High Magnetic field Laboratory 2012 MagLab Research Molecular Oncology Schlussel A, Eggerding F, Donlon S, Gagliano, RA.  Analysis of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Variant: p.R414C.  Gary P. Wratten Annual Surgical Symposium, San Antonio, Texas, May 2012. Jones LW, Coffee and Health in Thurston RW, et al, Coffee: A Handbook (2012), Lanham, MD. Roman & Littlefield. Imaging Cancer TCA Cycle Metabolism By Hyperpolarized 13C Succinate In Vivo Bhattacharya, P.1*, Wagner, S.1, Perman, W.H.2, Epstein, A. L.3, Imam, A1, Zacharias, N.M.1, Ross, B1,4 Singer E, Linehan H, Babilonia G, Imam A, Smith D, Loera S, Wilson T, Smith S.  Stromal Response to Prostate Cancer: Nanotechnology-Based Detection of Thioredoxin-Interacting Protein artners Distinguishes Prostate Cancer Asscoiated Stroma from that of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia   City of Hope, Huntington Medical Research Institute. Liver Lu, D. S., S. Siripongsakun, J. K. Lee, S. H. Wei, P. M. Cheng, S. Sabounchi, J. S. Lee, S. Raman, M. J. Tong, R. W. Busuttil and J. Sayre (2012). "Complete tumor encapsulation on MRI: A potentially useful imaging biomarker for better survival in solitary large hepatocellular carcinoma." Liver Transpl. Pan, C. Q., Z. P. Duan, K. R. Bhamidimarri, H. B. Zou, X. F. Liang, J. Li and M. J. Tong (2012). "An algorithm for risk assessment and intervention of mother to child transmission of hepatitis B virus." Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 10(5): 452-459. Siripongsakun, S., J. K. Lee, S. S. Raman, M. J. Tong, J. Sayre and D. S. Lu (2012). "MRI detection of intratumoral fat in hepatocellular carcinoma: potential biomarker for a more favorable prognosis." AJR Am J Roentgenol 199(5): 1018-1025. Tong, M. J. (2012). "Improved understanding of risk factors could help to reduce the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma." Gastroenterol Hepatol (N Y) 8(5): 320-321. Neural Engineering Han M, Manoonkitiwongsa PS, Wang CX and McCreery DB. (2012). "In vivo validation of custom-designed silicon-based microelectrode arrays for long-term neural recording and stimulation." IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 59(2): 346-354. Yang Z, Liu W, Keshtkaran MR, Zhou Y, Xu J, Pikov V, Guan C and Lian Y. (2012). "A new EC-PC threshold estimation method for in vivo neural spike detection." J Neural Eng 9(4): 046017. McCreery D,  Han M,  Pikov V, Yadav K,  Pannu S. Encoding of the amplitude modulation of pulsatile electrical  stimulation in the feline cochlear nucleus by neurons in the inferior colliculus; Effects of stimulus pulse rate (Submitted to Journal of Neural Engineering) Electrical performance of penetrating microelectrodes chronically implanted in cat cortex Sheryl R. Kane, Member, IEEE, Stuart F. Cogan, Member, IEEE, Julia Ehrlich, Timothy D. Plante, Douglas B. McCreery, Member, IEEE, Philip R. Troyk, Senior Member IEEE, (Submitted to IEEE transactions on Biomedical Engineering) Romanenko S, Siegel PH, Wagenaar DA, Pikov V (2013) Comparison of the effects of millimeter wave irradiation, general bath heating, and localized heating on neuronal activity in the leech ganglion. (Submitted to International Journal of Optics and Photonics) Rohan JG, Citron YR, Durrell AC, Cheruzel LE, Gray HB, Grubbs RH, Humayun M, Engisch KL, Pikov V, Chow RH (2013)  Light-triggered modulation of cellular electrical activity by ruthenium diimine nanoswitches. (Submitted to ACS Chemical Neuroscience) Huntington Medical Research Institutes Lu, D. S., S. Siripongsakun, J. K. Lee, S. H. Wei, P. M. Cheng, S. Sabounchi, J. S. Lee, S. Raman, M. J. Tong, R. W. Busuttil and J. Sayre (2012). "Complete tumor encapsulation on MRI: A potentially useful imaging biomarker for better survival in solitary large hepatocellular carcinoma." Liver Transpl. Pan, C. Q., Z. P. Duan, K. R. Bhamidimarri, H. B. Zou, X. F. Liang, J. Li and M. J. Tong (2012). "An algorithm for risk assessment and intervention of mother to child transmission of hepatitis B virus." Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 10(5): 452-459. Siripongsakun, S., J. K. Lee, S. S. Raman, M. J. Tong, J. Sayre and D. S. Lu (2012). "MRI detection of intratumoral fat in hepatocellular carcinoma: potential biomarker for a more favorable prognosis." AJR Am J Roentgenol 199(5): 1018-1025. Tong, M. J. (2012). "Improved understanding of risk factors could help to reduce the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma." Gastroenterol Hepatol (N Y) 8(5): 320-321.  
Posted 8 years ago
HMRInsights Newsletter - Winter 2013
Post Date: May 16, 2013   Author: adminhmri321   Category: HMRI Newsletters
Inside this issue: Click here to download our Newsletter in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. You will need the free Acrobat Reader software to read or print these documents.
  • Non-Intrusive Sleep Apnea Treatment;
  • Confocal Microscope;
  • Diamond Jubilee Tea;
  • Automation Advances;
  • HMRI Receives Top Rating;
  • Golf Tournament;
  • Guild Fashion Show;
  • HMRI Colorectal Research Fund;
  • HMRI Research Inspires Youth;
  • Employee Anniversary Luncheon;
  • Volunteer Spotlight - Jeannette Martin;
  • Partners in Discovery;
  • HMRI Publications;
  • Board of Directors.
 
Posted 8 years ago
Automation Advances Laboratory
Post Date: May 7, 2013   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Media Releases

New Equipment Enhances Critical Tissue Engineering Research

As our world becomes a faster-paced environment, life sciences have turned to automation to reduce costs and create more efficient operations.  Thanks to a grant from the Roy E. Thomas Foundation, researchers in the HMRI Tissue Engineering laboratory have recently acquired two new instruments that will allow them to streamline workflow through automation and spend more time on the discovery process in their search for new anti-cancer drugs. With the new Biomek 4000 Laboratory Automation Workstation, our Tissue Engineering program has the ability to increase production of tumor histoids – living human mini-tumors – used in testing new anti-cancer drugs.  Producing the large number of tumor histoids required for drug testing would be virtually impossible without robotic fluid handling offered by the Biomek 4000.  Much of the exorbitant cost of developing new anti-cancer drugs is attributed to the use of unreliable and inefficient test systems during screening of potential new drugs and can cost upwards of $1 billion to bring one new drug to market. The grant from the Roy E. Thomas Foundation also enabled the purchase of a second essential piece of equipment, the Synergy H1 Hybrid Multi-Mode Microplate Reader.  Placed next to the Biomek 4000 robotic system, this temperature-controlled programmable plate reader is used for spectrophotometric analysis of tumor histoids within their droplets.  Both pieces of equipment are housed within a laminar flow tissue culture hood, a requirement for maintaining the integrity of sterile cultures. “We are absolutely delighted, to say nothing of relieved and grateful, to have the important new equipment which will allow us to advance to a new phase of our research,” said Dr. Marylou Ingram, senior research scientist with the Tissue Engineering & In Vitro Systems program. “The grant from the Roy E. Thomas Foundation could not have been more timely or important to our research.”
Posted 8 years ago
HMRI Researcher Inspires Youth
Post Date: May 7, 2013   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Media Releases
“Thank you so much for coming to our science fair and teaching us about the human brain.  It looked really strange but was so cool!” “Thank you for inspiring [us] with science.  The fact I found most interesting is that neurologists do not know the causes of brain diseases.  I will look into becoming a neurologist.” “I learned so much from you about our brain.  My dad was amazed that I knew so much.” These are but a few of the many accolades expressed in “thank you” letters received by Dr. Michael Harrington, HMRI’s director of Molecular Neurology, following his presentation at a reverse science fair at Holy Redeeemer Middle School in Montrose.  Harrington was one of a number of physicians, researchers and engineers invited to participate in this annual event to give 7th and 8th graders an opportunity to understand science and medicine “up close and personal.” Beth Cohen, Holy Redeemer’s science teacher, acknowledged that Harrington’s presentation regarding the brain is the most popular which is why she invites him back every year.  “He truly knows how to inspire these kids and pique their curiosity,” she noted.  “His style is very real rather than sounding like a text book.”  The classroom presentation included viewing a real human brain followed by an explanation of the function of the brain and the mystery of brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and migraine. “As a researcher, I feel we have a moral and social responsibility to share information with our youth through science education,” noted Harrington.  “I thoroughly enjoy this annual opportunity to interact with our young people.”
Posted 8 years ago
HMRI Colorectal Research Fund: Advances in Surgical Treatment Applauded
Post Date: May 7, 2013   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Media Releases
For 20 years, Paula Welch-Forrest led a reclusive lifestyle complete with clinical depression, low energy, a lack of self-esteem and virtually no zest for life.  In 2012, Dr. Howard Kaufman, colorectal surgeon and HMRI researcher, changed all of that. Suffering from numerous colorectal problems and unable to get a proper diagnosis or successful treatment, Forrest was eventually referred to Kaufman. “By the time I met Dr. Kaufman, I had already been told I had the colon of an 80-year-old,” said 49-year-old Forrest.  “Dr. Kaufman was so kind and asked me questions that no other physician had bothered to ask.  He also listened carefully to what I had to say in order to put all of the pieces of the puzzle together.”  Forrest sensed right away that she finally had met the right physician whose extensive research and experience made him one of the top experts in his field. With a diagnosis of colonic inertia, a condition that occurs when muscles or nerves in the colon fail to function effectively, Kaufman performed a laparoscopic total abdominal colectomy.  Sometimes known as an ileorectal anastomosis, the surgery involves removal of the large intestine from the ileum (lowest part of the small intestine) to the rectum.  The end of the small intestine is then attached to the rectum. “Ms. Forrest was a wonderful and cooperative patient who was anxious to resolve her long-standing medical issues. I’m pleased that she recovered so well from the procedure and is moving forward with her life,” stated Kaufman. Since her surgical procedure, Forrest’s lifestyle has changed considerably.  She has become an active, social person who no longer hides out from the world.  Her family and friends barely recognize the new persona but are delighted.  “My husband calls me his ‘social butterfly’ now and tries to keep up with my schedule,” commented Forrest.  “I was too embarrassed to speak out about my medical problems before, but now I want to ‘shout it from the rooftops’ so others like me have hope.” In addition to a private practice and serving as medical director for Huntington Hospital’s Cancer Center, Kaufman is director of the Colorectal Research program at HMRI where he passionately pursues new technologies in his field.  He was one of the early pioneers of minimally invasive surgery for Crohn’s disease and was the first surgeon on the west coast to perform colon resections laparoscopically through a tiny single incision. “I cannot sing the praises of Dr. Kaufman enough,” said Forrest.  “Every time I receive a compliment regarding my renewed health, I tell them that Dr. Kaufman literally saved my life.  I’m asking everyone to show their appreciation by sending a donation to HMRI for the Colorectal Research Fund.  I’m proud to be able to honor Dr. Kaufman in this way so others can experience the same successful outcome.”
Posted 8 years ago
Confocal Microscope: Enabling Reconstruction of 3-D Structures from Images
Post Date: May 7, 2013   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Media Releases
HMRI has just purchased a scientific instrument vital to its research—a Zeiss LSM 510 META confocal microscope. Half the funds for the purchase were provided by the Altadena Guild of Huntington Hospital, a major funding partner of HMRI for over 60 years. The microscope greatly enhances the ability of HMRI neural engineers and neurologists to conduct detailed in-house research. “We received a great deal of assistance from the Altadena Guild to purchase this instrument, for which we are very grateful,” said Dr. Douglas McCreery, director of HMRI’s Neural Engineering program. “With the confocal microscope, we now have the ability to visually reach down into tissue and obtain a three-dimensional reconstruction of all of the different cell types. Doing this same work with a conventional microscope is extremely laborious and time-consuming, which is what we had to do prior to the confocal microscope.” A confocal microscope allows examination of a specimen in such a way that extremely high detail is obtained. Specific molecules can be isolated and examined by placing fluorescent dyes within antibodies which attach themselves to the molecules. A laser is used to cause the dyes to “light up” and be seen within the microscope. Because the microscope can also reach downward within a specimen, specific detail can be viewed which cannot be obtained with a conventional light microscope. “For a conventional microscope, specimens must be cut into thin sections,” explained Dr. Martin Han, biomedical engineer and staff scientist in HMRI's Neural Engineering program. “Whenever you cut tissue sections, you sacrifice a little bit of detail of the top and bottom. When you can examine it all together in one specimen, you preserve much of the existing tissue as it is, instead of losing 5 to 10 percent of everything you cut.” The microscope has already been put to immediate use within HMRI.  In research dealing with neurological implants, it is being used to view the results of long-term implantation. “On a cellular level, we are studying the interaction between the brain and the device we put into the brain,” said Han. “Prior to having the confocal microscope, we did some work using a confocal microscope at Caltech. The advantage of our new microscope over others is that it is motorized. We would have to manually scan a large area which took a long time and was very expensive. Now, we can automate the moving of one area to the next. It saves a lot of time and reduces human error.” “Having the equipment here, I can actually turn it on, leave it on for 24 hours, and let it scan whatever it needs to scan for an indefinite period,”  added Haison Duong, HMRI Neural Engineering research associate  “That increases the workflow quite a bit. I can basically calibrate all the settings and let it work on its own.” Another area of research utilizing the microscope is that of migraine headaches. “I plan to use the confocal microscope to look at the fine cellular localization of particular molecules that are involved in a model of migraine that we're studying,” said Dr. Michael Harrington, director of HMRI's Molecular Neurology program. “The reason we need a confocal microscope is that if I have two different molecules in the same cell, and they're in different regions of the cell, there's no way a regular microscope will unequivocally let me know where things are. That’s why we need the confocal microscope: we need what we refer to as sub-cellular localization.” In addition to the microscope itself, an attached computer and software is utilized for three-dimensional renderings after observation. Such renderings make it possible to view specimens from multiple angles, and also “stitch” together different images to create one all-encompassing image. Due to the capability of bringing detailed research completely in-house, it is expected that the LSM 510 META confocal microscope will earn back its purchase price rather quickly. “It will pay for itself within a year, just based on what it costs us per hour to go to another facility,” noted Duong.

2012

2011

Posted 10 years ago
HMRI Wins DARPA Grant to Develop More Reliable Connection Between the Brain and Prosthetic Limb Systems
Post Date: September 19, 2011   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Neural Engineering researchers at Huntington Medical Research Institutes in Pasadena, California, have been chosen by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop a better interface between the brain and prosthetic limbs. DARPA, the Department of Defense research and development office, has been faced with a continual challenge regarding prosthetics used by wounded war fighters returning from combat. Today’s best prosthetics have low functionality, and DARPA seeks to upgrade to models with greater dexterity and brain communication capability. That’s where researchers of HMRI’s Neural Engineering Department come in. They will determine why current brain interfaces to prosthetics fail over a relatively short time, usually a month or two. Once that has been determined, HMRI researchers hope to enable control of complex arm prosthetics by the brain to boost capability from 2 degrees of movement to 22 degrees, increasing elbow and wrist rotation and finger movements for greater facility in picking up objects, and keep that ability for years. In a recent clinical trial, “intracortical electrodes that could eventually be used for these complex robotic arms have shown to be unreliable even though they showed some promise,” said Dr. Martin Han, the primary investigator on the project, working with Dr. Douglas McCreery, director of HMRI’s Neural Engineering Program, and Dr. Victor Pikov. This project is a natural for HMRI’s Neural Engineering researchers. Established in 1970, the multi-disciplinary program’s goal is design, development and evaluation of implantable devices for functional electrical stimulation to replace impaired function of the nervous system. The HMRI program has internationally recognized expertise in evaluating the safety of the electrode-tissue interface, a major factor in the success of implantable neural prostheses such as those that could potentially be used by amputees. This is the first time the Neural Engineering Program has submitted a proposal to DARPA, and it’s not surprising HMRI won the contract. By incorporating four widely used electrode designs into a hybrid array, the Investigators propose to determine why the microelectrodes fail to record neuronal action potentials over long periods of time. Researchers have been trying to answer the question “Why do these devices fail?” “However, different researchers have used different surgical techniques, and different devices implanted into different brain regions," Han said. “Whenever these neurons fire, they tell these devices what to do. It’s very critical. When you lose that interface, you lose function,” he explained. “That interface” between neurons and prosthetic device is created when a microelectrode is implanted into the brain to record and decode its instructions to control the device. The microelectrode can be as thin as a single strand of hair and made of metal or metal-like silicon, though HMRI’s neural engineers have created thinner, more flexible polymer models. In this project, instead of stimulating neurons to fire, the microelectrodes “wait” for the neurons to transmit information that will drive a prosthetic arm in a certain way, for example, direction and velocity of movement. Some prosthetic arms are currently attached to muscle groups that govern movement. Implantable microelectrodes transmitting directly from neurons could offer users greater control and natural movement. Findings from this study could go beyond prosthetics to applications for other neurological disorders, including Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy, Han added. “This could be used for detecting epileptic seizures,” he explained. “Before a major onset of an epileptic seizure, there’s known to be some subtle brain activity that’s hard to detect with current technologies, but with these electrodes in the brain, they can detect the pending onset of a seizure before it happens.” This work is sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Microsystems Technology Office (MTO), under the auspices of Dr. Jack W. Judy (jack.judy@darpa.mil) as part of the Reliable Neural Technology Program, through the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) Systems Center (SSC) Pacific grant No. N66001-11-1-4010.  
Posted 10 years ago
New Implant Offered to Treat Chronic Involuntary Bowel Incontinence
Post Date: September 1, 2011   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Events & News
Dr. Howard Kaufman, director of HMRI’s Colorectal Research Program, is one of the initial 16 doctors across the nation approved to perform the new InterStim® bowel control therapy, offered by Medtronic, Inc., of Minneapolis, MN. Dr. Kaufman was a co-investigator in a multinational multicenter clinical study into whether the InterStim Therapy for urinary incontinence, for which Medtronic won FDA approval in 1997, could be successfully applied to bowel incontinence. “The study in which Dr. Kaufman participated to evaluate the Medtronic InterStim system as a remedy for bowel incontinence fits well with the history of HMRI’s Neural Engineering Program for developing and evaluating clinical applications of nerve stimulations,” said Dr. Douglas McCreery, Neural Engineering director. The HMRI Neural Engineering researchers have a long history of developing electrodes for activating nerves. The Huntington Helix array was licensed to Cyberonics, Inc. and subsequently has been implanted into more than 40,000 persons with epilepsy and with depression. Other version of our nerve electrodes have been evaluated by clinicians at the Cleveland Clinic for treating swallowing difficulties following cerebral stroke and at Washington University in St. Louis for treating urge incontinence. This latest InterStim study’s success earned FDA approval in March. Chronic involuntary loss of bowel control is a humiliating, life-changing condition. According to a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded study, more than 18 million Americans have fecal incontinence. Among older persons, the infirmity is the single most frequent factor for admittance to nursing homes because families have difficulty dealing with its demands. Caused by a variety of factors, it is most common among adults, predominately women who experience nerve and muscular trauma in the anus, rectum, and pelvic floor during childbirth. Eileen Brophy Williams was Dr. Kaufman’s first patient to participate in the clinical study. The former Newport Beach resident’s bowel incontinence resulted from an unsuccessful sphincteroplasty repair of an episiotomy following the birth of her first child 13 years ago. Her colorectal surgeon, Dr. Babak Rad, heard of the clinical study and referred her to Dr. Kaufman. She thought her incontinence was due to digestion problems because she was a new mother nervous about her child or possibly related to an old back injury. She simply had no feeling or sensation when she had incontinent episodes that occurred almost every day. Her life was severely limited to her household, and she wasn’t able to participate in her children’s school projects and so much more. Brophy Williams was a perfect candidate for the clinical trial because she had gone through various other treatment options. Dr. Kaufman explained those therapies included bowel habit modification through diet (increasing fiber, prescribing anti-diarrheal medications, etc.), sphincter muscle surgery, as well as biofeedback and physical therapy. InterStim Therapy is the only bowel control treatment option that allows patients and physicians to determine probable success of the therapy through a test stimulation procedure prior to committing to long-term therapy. Brophy Williams went through InterStim’s two-step outpatient implant process in March 2005. During the first visit, an electrode connects sacral nerves to an external test stimulator that can be adjusted for the correct amperage to stimulate nerves. “Patients will then walk around with the InterStim on a belt that’s programmed with the help of a Medtronic technician,” Dr. Kaufman explained. “If they pass the test of a reduction of incontinence of more than 50 percent for two weeks, they will qualify for a permanent implant.” Brophy Williams said that during those two weeks, she experienced the sensation for a bowel movement that she hadn’t experienced in years. She became a candidate for permanent implant. The InterStim Therapy uses an implantable system consisting of a thin wire lead and a neurostimulator, or pacemaker-like device about the size of a quarter, to stimulate the sacral nerve to control bowel function. The neurostimulator is implanted on the upper part of the buttock above the pelvis. “I was involved with the industry and thought this would be a technology to offer patients who had been unsuccessful with available therapies,” Dr. Kaufman said. “I was fortunate to have the patient population and the relationship already with Medtronic and other companies so we could stratify patients based on their anatomy and physiology.” “We implanted the device in 120 patients who met the inclusion criteria with various degrees of fecal incontinence,” Dr. Kaufman said. The study ran from 2002-2008, and “showed that at 12 months, 83 percent achieved ‘therapeutic’ success (with 41 percent of those subjects reaching 100 percent continence). While our paper reported on sustained success through two years, most patients have had continued success through their continued length of follow-up.” Additionally incontinent episodes decreased from a mean of 9.4 per week to 1.9/week at 12 months and 2.9/week at two years. “When I had this surgery within two weeks time, I was able to get involved with my kids in school,” Brophy Williams said. “It gave me back my life. I had stopped myself from having a life.” “There are women who are going through this who don’t even know they have this. I had no idea I was as injured as I was. I was told there wasn’t any help for me.” “Dr. Rad and Dr. Kaufman never gave up on me,” she recalled. “I owe them my life and my life with my kids and family.” Now, Dr. Kaufman is the first physician authorized to perform the InterStim implant for patients in the Southwest, including Southern California, Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico. After he has completed 20 implants, Dr. Kaufman will train other colorectal surgeons in the two-step, out-patient procedure. In an unrelated project funded by the National Institutes of Health, HMRI's Neural Engineering Program researchers have been working to develop a neuroprosthetic device to artificially control urination for spinal cord injured patients. HMRI NEP scientists are also studying mechanisms of stroke-induced overactive bladder and a possible treatment by intraspinal microstimulation.
Posted 10 years ago
National Institutes of Health Awards Grant for Migraine Research
Post Date: May 25, 2011   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Media Releases
The National Institutes of Health has awarded a four-year $1.4 million grant for migraine headache research to the Huntington Medical Research Institutes' Molecular Neurology Laboratory, directed by Michael Harrington, M.B., ChB., FRCP. HMRI scientists have recruited volunteer study participants from the San Gabriel Valley for research aimed at understanding the biochemistry of migraine. They measure the chemical composition of spinal fluid and blood, using powerful new mass spectrometry instruments combined with human genome information, to identify thousands of molecules in each sample. It is estimated that 30 million Americans suffer from migraine. Sufferers are exceptionally sick during migraine attacks, with pain affecting the muscles of the back of the head and neck. The HMRI scientists have identified components that change during attacks, between attacks, and what differs between migraine sufferers and those not troubled by headaches. Early results have revealed changes in molecules involved in many brain processes, including oxidation, blood vessel reactivity, pain and sleep. Dr. Harrington hopes to learn whether these chemical changes in the brain affect a predisposition to migraine, and so lead to better intervention and personalized treatment for individual sufferers. The project also receives funding from the Norris, Glide and Hezlep Family foundations, and from Thermo Finnigan, a medical technologies company in Palo Alto.
Posted 10 years ago
NIH Grant Will Support Studies of Bladder Dysfunction Resulting from Stroke
Post Date: May 25, 2011   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Media Releases
The National Institutes of Health awarded an $800,000 three-year research grant to Victor Pikov, Ph.D., of Huntington Medical Research Institutes' Neural Engineering Department. Dr. Pikov is studying the problem of stroke-related incontinence. His project, "Functional Microstimulation of the Lumbosacral Spinal Cord," explores using electrical stimulation to activate neurons in the spinal cord to restore bladder control following stroke. Pikov proposes using low-frequency electrical stimulation to create a stroke-like incontinence. The "virtual" stroke will inhibit the ability of lumbosacral spinal cord nerves to control the bladder. "Electrical stimulation in the spinal cord to restore voiding is a new area of research," says Dr. Pikov. "Only two other labs in the world are doing what we do at HMRI, but we have the advantage. We're using arrays of electrodes, rather than individual electrodes." For the past 30 years, HMRI's Neural Engineering program has been at the forefront of neural prosthesis research to produce safe, effective microstimulation to control the nervous system. In this case the implant, when activated, will produce symptoms of incontinence by applying repetitive electrical stimulation directly to the individual bladder neurons of the spinal cord. Pikov's simulation of incontinence is repeatable and reversible, and done without lesions or injury. The hoped-for result would be the development of an implantable array of electrodes controlling bladder function without any further need for invasive surgery or drug treatment. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and is the main cause of long-term disability among adults. Many people develop bladder dysfunction soon after suffering a stroke. A likely explanation is that a stroke reduces the brain's ability to inhibit the activity of spinal cord nerves involved in bladder contraction, resulting in incontinence. Currently, routine management of bladder dysfunction after stroke includes catheterization and drug treatment. Both have a significant risk of side effects such as urinary tract infections and urinary retention. Victor Pikov, Ph.D. was awarded the HMRI-Caltech Boswell Fellowship in 2000. The Boswell Fellowship, endowed by the James G. Boswell Foundation, supports postdoctoral scientists in joint research at Caltech and HMRI. He brings a background in neuroanatomy, immunohistochemisty and bladder physiology to the Neural Engineering laboratory. Born in Ukraine, he studied physiology at Kiev State University, received a B.A. cum laude in Biopsychology at Vassar College. He received his Ph.D. in Cell Biology from Georgetown University. Other members of the Neural Engineering team contributing to these studies include program director Douglas McCreery, Ph.D., Xindong Liu, Ph.D., and Leo Bullara. Their efforts have the potential to substantially improve the future quality of life for stroke patients.
Posted 10 years ago
HMRI Researcher Takes Strokes Against Stroke
Post Date: May 25, 2011   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Media Releases
One of the most distressing and challenging forms of neural injury is stroke. Also commonly called "brain attack," stroke affects the nervous system - one of the most important systems of the body, yet also the most vulnerable to injury and possessing the least capacity for recovery from the injury. Stroke is the third leading medical cause of death in the USA, the main cause of long-term disability among adults, and costs more than $70 billion annually in health care. About 30% of stroke victims are permanently disabled with a variety of severe impairments, including memory loss, vision, speech, motor control, voiding and sexual dysfunction. Intervention, prevention and rehabilitation methods to date have been insufficient to substantially reduce the number of strokes and alleviate their permanent side effects. Recently, Panya Steve Manoonkitiwongsa, Ph.D., of HMRI's Neural Engineering Laboratory described the nature of stroke, its complications and various treatments. He and his research colleagues are focusing on developing safe and effective therapeutic methods that would significantly improve existing forms of stroke recovery. Stroke injury can be broadly viewed as two types: hemorrhagic and ischemic. Both involve lack of oxygen to the brain. Hemorrhagic stroke occurs when blood vessels rupture and the blood oozes out of the vasculature (the blood vessels), causing the brain areas that normally receive blood from those hemorrhaged vessels - with the vital oxygen and nutrients they carry - to suffocate. Lack of blood (oxygen) to brain cells for just four minutes or less can permanently damage the cells. Hemorrhage further complicates the disease by pooling blood in the brain. Ischemic stroke, on the other hand, occurs when something in the blood vessel blocks the flow of blood; consequently, the blood stops flowing or its flow through the vessel is diminished. This leads to suffocation of the brain and damage to the brain cells. Most of the stroke incidences in the USA are ischemic strokes. Thus, most of the studies conducted in stroke research have addressed the biological problems and clinical treatments of ischemic stroke.

Current Treatment Choices

According to Dr. Manoon, the best intervention methods currently available "serve merely to restore blood flow and/or reduce the probability of further stroke injuries. Physical therapy commonly constitutes the rehabilitation process for the afflicted patient." Common non-invasive (that is, non-surgical) treatments for stroke include administering a variety of drugs to achieve several objectives:
  • thrombolysis - opens up the blood vessels that have been blocked
  • anticoagulation - thins the blood and reduces the probability of more blockage of the blood vessel
  • antihypertension - reduces blood pressure to avoid hemorrhage of the weakened blood vessels, or injury to the brain.
  • antiplatelet - reduces inflammation-related events so as to minimize the probability of further blockage of the blood vessel.
Thrombolysis is the treatment that is administered immediately to a patient when brought to the hospital or clinic to open up blocked blood vessels and restore blood flow to the brain. It involves infusion of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and is currently the only Food & Drug Administration (FDA)-approved procedure. This therapy is very limited in its application and effectiveness. It must be given within three hours from the onset of stroke, or hemorrhage may occur. The patient must not be on medications that could weaken the blood vessels, nor have any disease or abnormalities that could cause the weakening of the blood vessels. This treatment merely serves to restore blood flow but not to protect the brain cells (neurons) from injury and death. Furthermore, administration of tPA to the patient, in itself, could damage the neurons.

Improving the Odds

Unless the neurons that are damaged in stroke are preserved or protected from death, recovery can take a long time, if the patient recovers at all. Thus, stroke specialists agree that neuroprotection - that is, administering substances that would help preserve or protect the neurons - should be included with the tPA thrombolytic treatment. These would not only protect the neurons and reduce brain injury caused by the ischemic stroke, but also compensate for the adverse effects of tPA on the neurons. Several researchers worldwide are also proposing angiogenesis: treating stroke by causing the brain to make more blood vessels. The logic is that, by inducing the formation of more blood vessels in the brain, more blood would flow to the brain area that suffered the injury. The increased blood flow would, therefore, help relieve the oxygen deprivation in the brain. Some propose that a single agent that could provide both neuroprotection and angiogenesis would appear to be the most promising. Of the various chemicals tested through the years that are both neuroprotective and increase the formation of blood vessels, few have captured more attention than vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This substance accomplishes both things, but also has several negative side effects. One of the major side effects of this chemical is to cause the blood vessels to become permeable, or porous, so that blood fluids and substances in the blood leak out of the blood vessels into the brain. Thus, though VEGF may create new blood vessels in the brain, it can also cause the blood vessels that are already in the brain to become leaky. Even the new blood vessels that are formed are also permeable. It is, therefore, unclear whether VEGF could safely and effectively be used to cause neuroprotection and angiogenesis in the brain at the same time. Manoonkitiwongsa and his colleagues have conducted experiments to determine whether neuroprotection and angiogenesis by VEGF necessarily occur together. Their data, published in the June 24 Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, reveal that neuroprotection and angiogenesis maybe inversely related. That is, VEGF may be neuroprotective only as long as angiogenesis does not occur. When angiogenesis is significantly induced, VEGF no longer protects the brain, and creating more vessels may inflict further injury to the brain and worsen the consequences of stroke. They believe that VEGF could be a strong candidate for stroke therapy when used for neuroprotection, but that induction of angiogenesis by VEGF should be avoided by controlling the dosage. "Our data are very preliminary," says Manoonkitiwongsa. "More dosages need to be tested to confirm our hypothesis." They recently submitted a grant proposal to the National Institutes of Health for the purposes of 1) deciphering the relationship between neuroprotection and angiogenesis by VEGF and 2) characterizing the alterations in the brain exposed to the various doses of VEGF. Once these are precisely identified, and the mechanisms responsible for the relationships are elucidated, they hope to resolve whether neuroprotection and angiogenesis by VEGF can concurrently and safely be used as treatment methods for stroke. Neural Engineering Laboratory director Doug McCreery, Ph.D., said of this project, "Their research will provide significant and critical knowledge and bridge an important gap in our current understanding of stroke treatment."

Prevention Helps Too

Education about stroke prevention encourages reducing risk through healthful living - e.g. cessation of smoking and consumption of intoxicants, sufficient exercise, proper diet, weight control, sugar control and stress management. However, "at-risk" behaviors do not change quickly. The fact is, many of the general public do smoke, consume alcohol to excess, pursue sedentary work or activities for much of the time, do not exercise regularly, do not control their caloric intake, and are subjected to the mental and psychological stresses of everyday life. Furthermore, as a person advances in age, the brain and its blood vessels become weaker and more susceptible to stroke. With the more sedentary lifestyle that comes with advancing age, its probability increases further. The lifetime costs of therapy and medication per person are estimated to be $200,000 for hemorrhagic stroke and $100,000 for ischemic stroke. Inpatient hospital costs alone average about $30,000 per admission for hemorrhagic stroke and $10,000 for ischemic stroke. These expenses are in addition to physician services and other costs. Statistics show that more than 500,000 stroke episodes occur in the USA each year of which one-third are fatal. In 2002 alone, more than 700,000 strokes occurred in the USA, of which approximately 500,000 were first-ever strokes and 200,000 were recurrent strokes. If the age-specific rates of stroke remain unchanged from 2002 to 2025, the overall number of strokes in the USA will increase from approximately 700,000 in 2002 to 1,136, 000 in 2025.
Posted 10 years ago
HMRI Neural Engineers Lead Asian Bionics
Post Date: May 25, 2011   Author: adminhmri321   Category: Media Releases
Development of electronic neurological implants by Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI), a nonprofit biomedical research organization based in Pasadena, California, recently drew the attention of more than one hundred leaders of Asia's semiconductor micro-fabrication industry. On March 19-20, 2009, industry representatives from Taiwan, Japan, and Korea convened in Hisinchu, Taiwan for the First International Conference on Neuroprosthetic Devices (ICND), an event designed to enhance West-East interaction and collaboration in the rapidly advancing clinical use of neuroprosthetics and to introduce Taiwan's engineering community to this industry's unique technological and neurological research opportunities. Victor Pikov, Ph.D., a researcher, neural engineer and neurophysiologist with the HMRI Neural Engineering laboratory, chaired the conference's international organizing committee. Guest speakers recruited by Dr. Pikov and his committee included physicians and scientists from HMRI, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Mayo Clinic, University of Pennsylvania, and the University of California at Los Angeles. Douglas McCreery, Ph.D., director of the HMRI Neural Engineering Program and one of the nation's foremost experts on electrical stimulation of the nervous system, joined Dr. Pikov as guest speaker and representative of HMRI. Key areas covered during the presentations in neural prosthetics applications including deep brain stimulation for treatment of Parkinson's disease, brain recordings for detection and prediction of epilepsy, auditory prostheses, and devices for reanimating muscles paralyzed after spinal cord injury. Each presentation addressed current issues encountered in the development and design of neural prosthetic devices such as improved biocompatibility, development of carbon nanotube coatings for neural recording and stimulating electrodes, photolithographic electrode technologies, and the incorporation of photosensors and other active electronic components on retinal visual prostheses. The conference was sponsored by the National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan's chief academic establishment in the field of semiconductor technologies and electrical engineering. This university is closely affiliated with the Hsinchu Science-based Industrial Park; one of a number of advanced technology sites in Taiwan created to bring together industrial, research and academic resources and talents.

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